National News

Hennepin County, Minnesota, Sheriff's Office via AP

Tentative Trial Date Set For Ex-Minneapolis Officers Accused In George Floyd Death

A judge in Minnesota has set a March 8 trial date for the four former police officers accused in the death of George Floyd.

At an omnibus hearing Monday, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill said the trial date assumed that the former Minneapolis Police Department officers — Derek Chauvin, 44, who knelt on Floyd's neck and is charged with second-degree murder; J. Alexander Kueng, 26; Thomas Lane, 37; and Tou Thao, 34 — would be tried together, but he said that he expected motions to be filed by their attorneys for separate trials.


AP

Facebook Boycott Grows: Ford Joins Coca-Cola, Starbucks And Other Brands

The exodus of major advertisers from Facebook continues to grow as the company weathers criticism over its handling of racist, violent and other hateful rhetoric on the platform.


AP

4 Officers In San Jose, Calif., Put On Leave After Racist Social Media Posts Surface

The San Jose Police Department said it has placed four police officers on administrative leave. It is investigating allegations that they posted racist and anti-Muslim messages in a private Facebook group.

"We have no place for this," SJPD chief Eddie Garcia said in a written statement. A spokesperson for the police department did not identify the officers.


Boston Globe via Getty Images

What More Than 300 College Admissions Deans Are Looking For During The Pandemic

If you're worried about how the coronavirus pandemic is impacting your college applications, a statement endorsed by more than 300 college admissions deans might provide some relief.


AP

Golden State Killer Suspect Pleads Guilty To More Than A Dozen Murders

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Wearing an orange jumpsuit and a clear face shield to protect against the coronavirus, former police officer Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. pleaded guilty on Monday to 13 counts of first-degree murder. The string of murders in the 1970s and '80s terrorized California, and the suspect who committed them became known as the Golden State Killer.


AFP via Getty Images

'I Will Kill You': Health Care Workers Face Rising Attacks Amid COVID-19 Outbreak

"I will kill you."

That's what a family member of a COVID-19 patient told a general practitioner at a private hospital in Aden, Yemen, amid the country's coronavirus outbreak in April.

Pointing a gun at the doctor, the family member pushed him to put the patient on oxygen and mechanical ventilation, two types of treatments for severe cases of COVID-19.

The doctor explained that he wouldn't be able to provide those options for the patient.


AFP via Getty Images

Ohio's State Capital Grapples With Anti-Columbus Sentiment

St. Louis, St. Paul, Richmond, Boston — cities across the country have dismantled, torn down or removed their statues honoring the explorer Christopher Columbus. One of the more recent and more surprising additions to that list is his namesake: Columbus, Ohio. The city once had three Christopher Columbus statues.

Construction crews recently dismantled a marble statue on the campus of Columbus State Community College, loading it piece by piece onto a flatbed truck to be put into storage.


AP

Which States Are Reopening? A State-By-State Guide

Every U.S. state implemented restrictions designed to limit the spread of COVID-19. Businesses reduced or ceased operations, people transitioned into working and learning remotely, and nonessential activities were paused. Much of the country was under strict orders to stay home, at least temporarily.


AP

Supreme Court Clears Way For Federal Executions To Resume

The Supreme Court has declined to hear a challenge to the federal death penalty method, allowing the executions of four men scheduled in the coming weeks to go forward. They would be the first uses of the death penalty in federal cases since 2003.

The court's order was posted Monday. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor indicated that they would have considered the case.


Getty Images

'Scared, Confused And Angry': Protester Testifies About Lafayette Park Removal

Members of Congress are holding a hearing to examine the forced removal of peaceful protesters by U.S. Park Police near the White House in early June.


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