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The DOJ Won't Defend Rep. Mo Brooks In Court Against Claims He Incited The Jan. 6 Riot

The Justice Department rejected a request by Alabama Republican Rep. Mo Brooks for legal protection in court against a lawsuit linking him to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.


AP

Masks Will Return To The U.S. House And White House After The CDC Changes Guidance

Masks are again required for members of the House side of the U.S. Capitol amid a nationwide rise in coronavirus cases.

Under the reimplemented mandate, members, both vaccinated and unvaccinated, must wear a "well-fitted, medical grade, filtration face mask" in House office buildings, during meetings, and while in the House Chamber. Under the order from Dr. Brian Monahan, Congress's attending physician, the new rule doesn't effect members of the Senate.


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China's New U.S. Ambassador Pioneered The Foreign Ministry's Brash Tone

BEIJING — As a spokesperson, he delivered excoriating one-liners and helped pioneer a brash, more sharply confident communication style from the Chinese foreign ministry's pulpit.


AP

4 Takeaways From The Emotional 1st Select Committee Hearing On The Capitol Attack

The stunning attack on the U.S. Capitol by a mob of Trump supporters roughly six months ago threatened lawmakers and came close to upending the process to certify the 2020 presidential election.

Most members of Congress decried the onslaught in the hours after the Jan. 6 insurrection, but since then the date has become a deeply polarizing moment on Capitol Hill.


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Biden Wants To Raise The Threshold For Products Considered 'Made In America'

President Biden on Wednesday will roll out a new proposed rule that would change the way the federal government assesses products made in America.

Right now, the federal government has to spend tax dollars on products made in the United States, but purchases qualify for that label with 55% of their materials coming from the U.S. Biden is proposing raising the threshold to 75% by the end of the decade.


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Policing In Minneapolis May Look Different After A Ballot Vote In November

Minneapolis voters will decide this November whether to end their city's police department, replacing it with a new "Department of Public Safety."

The city council last week signed off on language for a ballot question to change the city charter to create a new agency.


Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Men Who Have Been Sexually Abused Have Trouble Getting Treatment

Jim Holland says he was raped by a priest when he was 13 years old. For the next 30 years, Holland locked his trauma away, holding it at bay with drinking, drugs and promiscuity. The 2003 Boston Globe Spotlight investigation of sexual abuse by priests triggered his memories.

"I kept on saying, 'No, it was no big deal. That really didn't happen,' " says Holland.

Holland knew he needed help, but there were few therapists specializing in this kind of trauma. So he shoved his pain back down.


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A White House Plan Aims To Speed Up Consideration Of Many Asylum Claims

The White House is moving forward on a plan to have Department of Homeland Security asylum officers take over cases on the southern United States border, a change that would shift future asylum cases out of backlogged immigration courts.

The Biden administration's measure is one of a series of moves to speed up consideration of asylum claims, steps it says would reduce the backlog and make the immigration system more orderly and fair.


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You Might Consider Opting Out Of The Child Tax Credit. Here's Why

For many, it was a welcome surprise. On July 15, cash flowed into the bank accounts of parents across the U.S. as the government rolled out the first monthly payments of the enhanced child tax credit passed by Congress this spring.

But as helpful as those payments are to a lot of families, they could actually create headaches for others, with some people owing money to the government next year.


How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct

For the first time, scientists have shown that a new kind of genetic engineering can crash populations of malaria-spreading mosquitoes.

In the landmark study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications, researchers placed the genetically modified mosquitoes in a special laboratory that simulated the conditions in sub-Saharan Africa, where they spread the deadly disease.


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