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AP

Zimbabwe Orders Second Internet Shutdown In A Week Of Deadly Protests

Zimbabwe has constricted Internet access amid a week of deadly protests following an increase in gasoline prices.

Econet Wireless Zimbabwe, the country's largest mobile phone operator, said early Friday that it had been directed by the government to shut down all Internet access for the second time in a week.


AP

Shutdown Pressures Freshman Democrats To Deliver On Promise To Break Gridlock

Democrats won control of the House of Representatives in November in part by promising to work across the aisle and get things done. Now the newly elected freshmen must decide how they will use their newfound power in the face of the longest partial government shutdown in U.S. history.


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Fleeing Crisis, Some Venezuelans Are Recruited By Rebel Forces Fighting In Colombia

About one-third of the more than 3 million Venezuelans who have fled their nation's deep economic crisis have settled in next-door Colombia. But some of these refugees, instead of finding safe haven, are being recruited into Colombia's guerrilla groups, human rights and military officials tell NPR.


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Tesla Cuts 3,000 Jobs As Elon Musk Aims To Make More Cars For Less Money

Tesla is reducing its workforce by 7 percent — more than 3,000 jobs, according to a recent staffing estimate — as the company continues its efforts to bring lower-cost electric vehicles to market.

CEO Elon Musk announced the layoffs on Friday in an email to staff, saying the company is facing "an extremely difficult challenge."


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BuzzFeed: Trump Directed Cohen To Lie To Congress About A Trump Tower In Moscow

Michael Cohen, former personal lawyer for Donald Trump, has admitted he lied to Congress about efforts to build a Trump Tower in Russia. Now, a BuzzFeed News report says Cohen reportedly told investigators that he lied to lawmakers about the real estate project at Trump's direction.

The report cites two law enforcement officials with direct knowledge of the Trump Tower Moscow investigation.


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Tribune Publishing CEOs Are Out After A Series Of Controversies

Top officials at Tribune Publishing, which owns the Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun and the New York Daily News, are leaving after a wave of controversies. Those affected include the newspaper chain's CEO and the two top officials of its digital arm, according to a memo sent to staffers Thursday from the new CEO, newspaper executive Timothy Knight.


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Pelosi Says Trump Administration Leaked Plans To Fly Commercially To War Zone

Updated 3:48 p.m. ET

The back and forth between President Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., over the partial government shutdown escalated Friday, as Pelosi said the White House leaked plans for a congressional delegation to fly commercially to Afghanistan.

On Thursday, Trump said he was revoking a military flight for the CODEL, suggesting Pelosi fly commercial instead.


AP

Defying Trump Administration, Calif. Offers Federal Workers Unemployment Benefits

California Gov. Gavin Newsom says the Trump administration has told states they can't offer unemployment benefits to federal employees who are required to report to work without pay during the government shutdown.

Newsom called a letter sent to states by the U.S. Department of Labor "jaw-dropping and extraordinary" as he met with TSA workers at the Sacramento International Airport Thursday afternoon. "So, the good news is, we're going to do it, and shame on them."


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Former Chicago Cop Jason Van Dyke To Be Sentenced For Laquan McDonald Murder

Former Chicago Police Officer Jason Van Dyke is expected to be sentenced Friday for the 2014 murder of teenager Laquan McDonald, and the judge has a wide range of punishment options.


Bloomberg via Getty Images

Attempts To Make Shutdown 'Painless' May Stretch Limits Of Federal Law

In its quest to blunt the effects of the partial government shutdown, the Trump administration is using broad legal interpretations to continue providing certain services.

Critics argue that the administration is stretching — and possibly breaking — the law to help bolster President Trump's position in his fight with Democrats over funding for a border wall.

Even with the creative use of loopholes and existing funds, though, the actions the administration is taking will be hard to sustain if the shutdown continues to drag on.


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