National News

Why It's So Hard To Turn The Lights Back On In Puerto Rico

Nearly a month after Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico, almost 80 percent of the territory is still without power. While nobody expected a quick restoration of Puerto Rico's badly outdated power grid, officials have estimated that it could take at least six months.

Federal Judge Will Not Void Guilty Ruling On Arpaio, Despite Trump's Pardon

U.S. District Judge Susan Ritchie Bolton says that President Trump's pardon of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio does not "revise the historical facts" of his case — and that she will not vacate her ruling that found Arpaio guilty of criminal contempt.

FBI Anti-Sex Trafficking Operation Rescues 84 Minors

In a four-day nationwide aimed at sex trafficking, the Federal Bureau of Investigations says it had rescued 84 minors, and arrested 120 people.

Switching To Middle School Can Be Hard On Kids, But There Are Ways To Make It Better

"I'll be famous one day, but for now I'm stuck in middle school with a bunch of morons." That's harsh language from the downtrodden sixth-grade narrator of Diary of A Wimpy Kid, a blockbuster series of graphic novels.

But it speaks to a broader truth.

Webcast: Can The World Finally Wipe Out Polio?

Editor's note: The archived video of the polio panel discussion will be posted next week.

The world is incredibly close to wiping out polio. This year the number of polio cases has shrunk to fewer than a dozen. And those cases are in just two countries- Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Virginia Statehouse Race Pits 'Bathroom Bill' Author Against Transgender Woman

State legislative races don't usually draw a lot of national attention – but Virginia's House District 13 race is: it pits a Republican incumbent known for unsuccessfully sponsoring a so-called "bathroom bill" against a transgender woman.

Rural Hospice That Spurns Federal Funds Has Offered Free Care for 40 Years

Rose Crumb can't even count the number of people she's helped die.

The former nurse, 91, who retired in her mid-80s, considers the question and then shakes her head, her blue eyes sharp above oval spectacles.

"Oh, hundreds," estimates Crumb, the woman who almost single-handedly brought hospice care to the remote Pacific Northwest city of Port Angeles, Wash., nearly 40 years ago.

CIA Trainee Washes Out Of Bomb Detection, Reassigned To Living Room

Some jobs are just not a good fit. That seems to have been the case for a certain canine trainee named Lulu at the Central Intelligence Agency.

The black Labrador was in an intensive course of study to learn how to sniff out bombs. But Lulu just wasn't that interested.

"[It's] imperative that the dogs enjoy the job they're doing," the CIA writes in a news release on Wednesday announcing Lulu's reassignment to her handler's living room.

CIA Backs Off Director's Claim That Russian Meddling Didn't Swing Election

The CIA on Thursday was forced to walk back an assertion by Director Mike Pompeo, who incorrectly said U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russian efforts to influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election were unsuccessful.

Asked at a security conference in Washington, D.C., on Thursday whether he could say with absolute certainty that the November vote was not skewed by Russia, Pompeo replied: "Yes. Intelligence community's assessment is that the Russian meddling that took place did not affect the outcome of the election."

Senate Passes Budget Resolution Seen As Key To Trump's Tax Overhaul

Senate Republicans passed a $4 trillion budget blueprint late Thursday by a narrow 51-49 vote, with Kentucky's Sen. Rand Paul joining Democrats in opposing the measure considered a key step in forward on President Trump's promises of a tax overhaul.

The White House praised the bill, saying it "creates a pathway to unleash the potential of the American economy through tax reform and tax cuts."

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