National News

If A Pile Of Poo Has An Emoji, Shouldn't A Mosquito Have One Too?

There are 2,666 emojis available for tweets and texts.

Everything from a butterfly to a croissant to a unicorn.

But global health advocates think there's one important emoji that's missing: the mosquito. It is, after all, the world's deadliest animal. The diseases it spreads, like malaria and dengue, cause one million deaths a year.

Drug Companies Make Eyedrops Too Big, And You Pay For The Waste

If you've ever put in eyedrops, some of them have almost certainly spilled onto your eyelid or cheek.

The good news is the mess doesn't necessarily mean you missed. The bad news is that medicine you wiped off your face is wasted by design — and it's well-known to the drug companies that make the drops.

'A Major Distraction': Is A Mega-Deal Like Amazon's HQ2 Always Worth It?

On a wall in Greg LeRoy's office is a frame with a custom-engraved wrench and a photo of workers in front of the Diamond Tool and Horseshoe factory in Duluth, Minn. It's from his days helping unions fight plant closings — when he first started digging into the convoluted financial relationship of corporations and local governments.

These days, LeRoy is the guy to call if you want to know about corporate subsidies. Lately, his phone has been ringing about one company in particular: Amazon.

A Third Of California's Fire Evacuees Still Waiting To Go Home

Even as many of the thousands of people forced to evacuate from the deadliest wildfires in California's history were being allowed to return to their homes, yet another fire has started in the Santa Cruz mountains.

Authorities said 60 people were still missing on Tuesday from the fires that have killed at least 41 people, destroyed more than 6,000 homes and burned through some 200,000 acres of the state.

Democrats To Attorney General Sessions: Don't Duck Our Questions

Attorney General Jeff Sessions will appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee for an oversight hearing Wednesday. There's a lot to discuss.

In eight months as the nation's top federal law enforcement official, Sessions has presided over a series of Justice Department reversals — from police oversight and voting rights litigation to protections for the LGBT community.

Officers Fired After Forcible Removal Of United Airlines Passenger

Two security officers who were caught on video in April forcibly removing a passenger from a United Airlines flight in Chicago were fired following the incident that sparked widespread public outrage.

Amazon Studios Exec Roy Price Resigns Following Harassment Allegations

Amazon Studios confirms that it has accepted the resignation of top executive Roy Price after he was suspended following allegations of sexual harassment.

NFL And Players Meet, But Punt On Anthem Controversy

NFL owners and players met at league headquarters in New York on Tuesday but failed to resolve the contentious issue of national anthem protests.

Eleven owners and 13 players attended the meeting that lasted for several hours and was variously described as "positive" and "constructive," but didn't break any new ground on the protests that have seen players take a knee, sit or raise fists during pregame renditions of the national anthem to protest against racial inequality and police shootings of unarmed black men.

Report Blames Pilot In Deadly Balloon Crash, But Also Points Finger At FAA

A National Transportation Safety Board report on the 2016 hot air balloon crash that killed all 16 people aboard finds that the pilot's "pattern of poor decision-making" was to blame. But the safety board also reserves some culpability for an FAA policy that exempts commercial balloon operators from needing medical certification.

Efforts To Rewrite NAFTA Not Going Well; Next Round of Talks Delayed

When negotiators for the United States, Canada and Mexico wrapped up the latest round of trade talks in Washington on Tuesday, they sounded frustrated — and far apart.

From cars to cows, they have big disagreements over how the North American Free Trade Agreement should work. In fact, the disputes appear so big, they may be threatening the future of NAFTA.

So officials have agreed to delay their next meeting — pushing off its start in Mexico City until Nov. 17; they originally had planned to meet later this month.

Pages