National News

FAA Proposes $1.9 Million Fine Against Photo Company Over Drone Use

The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing a $1.9 million fine against an aerial photography company the agency says took 65 unauthorized flights using drones.

"Flying unmanned aircraft in violation of the Federal Aviation Regulations is illegal and can be dangerous," FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said in statement. "We have the safest airspace in the world, and everyone who uses it must understand and observe our comprehensive set of rules and regulations."

An image from the Draft Kings website shows the range of fantasy games they run — with payouts of thousands of dollars at stake.

Fantasy Sports Sites Face Questions About Games' Integrity

Updated 9:45 p.m. ET with state attorney general investigation

Two leading fantasy sports companies are promising to protect "the integrity of the games" they offer customers, after questions emerged over whether their employees use proprietary information to win thousands of dollars.

South Carolina Girds For Long Recovery From Record Rains

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"This is unacceptable," NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said of Russian military aircraft violating Turkey's airspace. NATO defense ministers will meet Thursday to discuss the situation.

Russian Warplane Incursions In Turkey Are 'Unacceptable,' NATO Chief Says

"This is unacceptable." That's what NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg had to say about Russian military aircraft violating Turkey's airspace twice this weekend. Stoltenberg also has said he doubts Russia's explanation that it was an accident.

At issue most recently is the Turkish military's allegation that on Sunday, "a MiG-29 plane of unidentified nationality for five minutes and 40 seconds kept two Turkish F-16 planes on its radar as potential targets," reports the Russian news agency Tass.

Secretary of State John Kerry (left) greets Boeing employees in May prior to talking about the benefits to U.S. exporters of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

This We Do Know About TPP: The Shouting Is Already Loud

Even though President Obama has not yet released details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership announced Monday, supporters and opponents are making their voices heard — at full volume.

Business leaders and interest groups hope their impassioned pleas will sway Congress, which must vote on the proposed deal next year.

This is what the cheers sounded like:

The "Super-Kamiokande" neutrino detector operated by the University of Tokyo's Institute for Cosmic Ray Research helped scientist Takaaki Kajita win a share of the Nobel Prize in Physics, along with Canadian Arthur B. McDonald.

Physics Nobel Awarded For Work On Neutrinos' Metamorphosis

Two scientists from Canada and Japan have won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for opening "a new realm in particle physics," the Nobel Prize committee says. Working far apart, both Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald showed how neutrinos shift identities like chameleons in space.

Miller wouldn't say whether he's a Republican or a Democrat, but said he identifies with whoever he thinks "Jesus would vote for if he were still walking the earth, and that's something I kind of see in [Ben] Carson."

Meet The Obama-Era Kids Who Are About To Be First-Time Voters

Young people loved President Obama in 2008 — they turned out to support him more than any other recent Democratic presidential nominee.

But now, there's a new crop of young voters — the kids who came of age during the Obama presidency. They're are all grown up, and getting their first chance to vote for president.

They grew up in a different era — after Sept. 11 attacks and in the middle of the recession.

The trauma center operated in Kunduz by Doctors Without Borders was in flames after U.S. airstrikes on Saturday that left 22 dead, including medical staff and patients.

Was Kunduz Attack A War Crime? Legal Analysts Say It's Difficult To Prove

The international aid group Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) is calling for an international investigation into what it calls a war crime in Afghanistan — Saturday's U.S. airstrikes that killed 22 people, including medical staff and patients at the organization's hospital in Kunduz.

People huddle in front of the Habana Libre hotel in Havana, trying to get on the Internet.

Internet Access Expands In Cuba — For Those Who Can Afford It

The best place to see Cuba's Internet explosion is along the busy Havana thoroughfare known as La Rampa, or the Ramp.

Named for its sloping descent toward the sea, it is congested and loud. Still, crowds pack the sidewalks, office alcoves and driveways here to get online. They huddle within a few blocks of huge cell towers atop the Habana Libre luxury hotel. All eyes are glued to smartphones, tablets and laptops.

Raul Cuba, 41, types a lengthy Internet access code and password into his phone. He only learned how to log on a month ago.

Andris Roder (left) and Adam Finding, cooks at the Kisuzem restaurant in Budapest, prepare a traditional Eritrean meal of <em>injera</em> bread, chickpea paste and meat stew. Their restaurant served up Eritrean food all week for a food festival in solidarity with migrants and refugees streaming into Hungary.

Budapest Foodies Hope Cuisine Can Help Heal Anti-Migrant Prejudice

Customers crowd into a bustling Budapest restaurant for dinner. They open their menus, expecting to read about stuffed paprikas and Hungarian goulash.

But instead they find ... Eritrean sourdough pancake bread. Afghan pie. Syrian sweets.