National News

Starfish Illness Harms Other Sea Creatures

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In Las Vegas, Obama Sells His Immigration Plan

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Asians — Not Just Latinos — Benefit From Obama's Immigration Action

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A harvester holds ginseng roots. Wild ginseng roots can bring big profits overseas, especially in Asia, but it is illegal to poach the root from U.S. national parks.

National Parks Look To Lock Out Wild Ginseng Diggers

Digging for wild ginseng pays: It sells for thousands of dollars in overseas markets. But it is illegal to take ginseng from national parks, where authorities are working to thwart poachers.

They come to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and Jim Corbin, a plant protection specialist with North Carolina's agriculture department, is out to protect wild ginseng root from the poachers.

Temperatures are taken two ways at Casablanca's airport: with an infrared body scanner (left) and a handheld thermometer (right).

You Might Be Surprised When You Take Your Temperature

What's your temperature?

That's the question of the hour. The Ebola virus has made taking your temperature part of everyday conversation. People in West Africa are doing it. People returning from the region are doing it. And so are the overly paranoid in the United States.

For anyone who's been exposed to the virus, a body temperatures of 100.4 or higher has been deemed the point of concern. The goal, of course, is that magic number: 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

Except 98.6 degrees isn't so magical after all. In fact, that might not be your normal temperature.

Wealthy Arabs Flock To Pakistan To Kill The Bustards

Winter is creeping down on northern Pakistan from the Himalayan Mountains. The skies are cloudless and bright blue. The air is as cool and refreshing as champagne.

This is the season for swaddling yourself in a big woolen shawl. And it's also the season when Pakistanis try not to ... let the bustards get them down.

I'm talking about the Houbara bustard. It's a bird, about half the size of a turkey, and with the same rotten luck this time of year.

Rats are a common sight along the streets of Antananarivo, where trash can go weeks, even months, without being collected.

Plague Outbreak In Madagascar Spreads To Its Capital

An outbreak of the plague has sickened at least 119 people and killed 40 in Madagascar, the World Health Organization reports Friday.

The outbreak started back in August in a rural village, WHO said. Then it spread to seven of Madagascar's 22 regions. Two cases have occurred in the country's capital of Antananarivo.

"There is now a risk of a rapid spread of the disease due to the city's high population density and the weakness of the health care system," the WHO writes.

Buffalo Bills cornerback Stephon Gilmore prepares to take the bus, leaving Ralph Wilson Stadium to play a "home" game in Detroit. Tickets to the game, postponed to Monday, are free.

Buffalo Blizzard Brings Odd NFL Game: Free, And Far From Home

Many things will make Monday night's NFL game between the Buffalo Bills and New York Jets an odd duck. Among them: It's being played in Michigan, and tickets to the game are being given away at no charge.

"Free tickets will be available for Monday's matchup between the Buffalo Bills and the New York Jets at Ford Field," the Detroit Lions announced today, adding that emails are being sent out to Bills and Lions season-ticket holders that will let them snag seats.

The 2012 attacks on U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, happened without an intelligence failure, a House panel concludes. A photo from 2013 shows wreckage outside the main gate of the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi.

House Panel Finds 'No Intelligence Failure' Before Benghazi Attack

After a nearly two-year investigation, the final report by the House Intelligence Committee concludes that the CIA "ensured sufficient security for CIA facilities in Benghazi and ... bravely assisted the State Department" on Sept. 11, 2012, during a deadly attack on U.S. facilities in Libya.

That's the first conclusion of the report, the result of thousands of hours of investigation into the events that led to the deaths of U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry looks at his phone as he leaves a meeting in Vienna on Friday.

Kerry, Iranian Counterpart Meet Again In Nuclear Talks

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Iranian counterpart, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, added another meeting today in Vienna in the push toward an agreement on Iran's nuclear program.

Iranian news reports had earlier said Zarif was returning to Tehran for further instructions. And Kerry had been scheduled to leave Vienna for Paris – something he could still do while talks continue — before adding the late Friday meeting.

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