National News

Nepal Ends Rescue Efforts After Deadly Avalanches In Himalayas

Nepal has ended rescue operations for people who may have been trapped or died in blizzards and avalanches last week throughout the foothills of Nepal's Himalayan mountain range. Locals and international tourists are among at least 39 people known to have died. Rescuers say those killed include four Canadians, two Poles, an Israeli, an Indian and a Nepali.

The Associated Press reports that officials believe no more people are stranded:

Police found one of seven women's bodies over the weekend at Motel 6 in Hammond, Ind.

Indiana Officials Say Man Has Led Them To Multiple Bodies

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Police in Hammond, Ind., believe they may be on to a serial killer after a man who confessed to killing one woman subsequently led authorities to the bodies of six others, The Associated Press reports.

Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson tells the AP that the suspect, 43, directed investigators to sites where bodies were found Saturday and Sunday. Freeman-Wilson said the suspect is from Austin, Texas.

Swedish corvette HMS Stockholm patrols Jungfrufjarden in the Stockholm archipelago, Sweden, on Monday. Swedish authorities say they've detected "foreign underwater activity" thought to be a possible Russian submarine.

Sweden's Sub Hunt Evokes Cold War Memories

The hunt for a possible Russian submarine operating clandestinely in Swedish waters might sound familiar to those of us who lived through the Cold War: That's because it bears striking similarities to a 1981 incident that made international headlines and proved a major embarrassment for Soviet authorities.

Here's what happened over the weekend, according to The Wall Street Journal:

<em>Taqueria La Delicia</em> is a <em>lonchera</em>, or food truck, that parks near a Lowe's Home Improvement store in New Orleans. The owner is Honduran, and so are many of the day laborers who eat there.

In The Big Easy, Food Vendors Create A Little Honduras

Thanks to a quirk of history — and a love of bananas — New Orleans has had a Honduran population for more than a century. But that population exploded after Hurricane Katrina, when the jobs needed to rebuild the city drew waves of Honduran immigrants. Many of them stayed, and nearly a decade later, they've established a thriving — if somewhat underground — culinary community.

Signs of that community abound, if you know where to look.

Pro-democracy protesters gather during a rally of the ongoing Occupy Central movement in the Admiralty District of Hong Kong on Monday. The territory's leader has accused foreign elements of helping stoke unrest.

Hong Kong Leader Blames 'External Forces' For Joining Protests

Hong Kong's leader is blaming "external forces" for helping stoke student-led pro-democracy protests that have brought parts of the Chinese territory to a halt in recent weeks.

Leung Chun-ying's statement in a televised interview on Sunday marked the first time he blamed foreign involvement for the unrest, something that Beijing has said repeatedly during the three weeks of demonstrations, according to The Associated Press.

Dutch Foreign Minister Bert Koenders (center) speaks with Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn (second from left) and British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond (right) during a round table meeting of EU foreign ministers in Luxembourg on Monday. The ministers hope to raise 1 billion euros to fight Ebola.

Latest Developments In The Ebola Story

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

It's Monday, and Ebola still dominates the headlines. Here's a roundup of some of the latest developments:

Duncan's Family Completes 21-Day Quarantine:

Turkish Kurds watch the Syrian town of Kobani from a hill near the Mursitpinar border crossing on Monday.

Turkey Says It's Helping Iraqi Kurds Join Fight For Kobani

Turkey says it is assisting Iraqi Kurdish fighters in crossing into Syria to aid their brethren in the embattled city of Kobani, where Kurds have fought a fierce defense action for weeks against besieging Islamic State militants.

"We are assisting peshmerga forces [Iraqi Kurds] to cross into Kobani," Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu told reporters in Ankara. He added: "We have no wish at all to see Kobani fall."

Cavusoglu offered no details.

Apple Pay is demonstrated at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif.

Will Apple's Mobile Wallet Replace Your Leather Wallet?

On Monday, Apple is rolling out a new way to pay: a digital wallet called Apple Pay. Millions of people with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus will be able to tap — rather than swipe — at the register.

The move could be a major change in how we shop. Or it could end up as a blip on the map that fades away, as other "mobile wallets" have in the past.

Here are some questions you might be asking:

I have a leather wallet in my back pocket. Am I going to have it a year from now, given this mobile-wallet revolution?

Meghan, 23, began experiencing hallucinations at 19. "Driving home, cars' headlights turned into eyes. The grills on the cars turned into mouths and none of them looked happy. It would scare the crap out of me," Meghan says.

Halting Schizophrenia Before It Starts

The important thing is that Meghan knew something was wrong.

When I met her, she was 23, a smart, wry young woman living with her mother and stepdad in Simi Valley, about an hour north of Los Angeles.

Meghan had just started a training program to become a respiratory therapist. Concerned about future job prospects, she asked NPR not to use her full name.

The Rev. Herman Browne voluntarily quarantined himself for 21 days after his wife's friend tested positive for Ebola. On Sunday, he returned to his church, Trinity Cathedral, to preach to his congregation about Ebola prevention.

Ebola In Church: A Reverend's Quarantine Spreads The Word

Night clubs have shut their doors. Soccer leagues have been suspended. And a strict curfew is keeping the streets empty at night.

But there's one place in Monrovia where people continue to gather despite the threat of Ebola: Sunday church service.

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