National News

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (right) and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo both insist on mandatory quarantine for healthcare workers who've had contact with Ebola patients. Christie wants them held in a medical facility; Cuomo says a home quarantine with outside monitoring would do.

Medical Journal To Governors: You're Wrong About Ebola Quarantine

The usually staid New England Journal of Medicine is blasting the decision of some states to quarantine returning Ebola healthcare workers.

In an editorial the NEJM describes the quarantines as unfair, unwise and "more destructive than beneficial." In their words, "We think the governors have it wrong."

The editors say the policy could undermine efforts to contain the international outbreak by discouraging American medical professionals from volunteering in West Africa.

We asked you to send in your embarrassing instant messenger handles from days gone by. Thanks for sharing, Blondsoccerplyr, AgentGiggleChunk and absofsteel3616!

What's More Embarrassing Than That Old Screen Name? Sharing It

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

Before Google Chat, before Facebook Messenger, there was AOL Instant Messenger. AIM still exists today, but it was hugely popular in the late 1990s. And for many young adults who grew up using AIM, those old screen names are a blast from the past they'd just as well forget.

Members of a cleaning crew clear the New York apartment of Dr. Craig Spencer, who has been diagnosed with Ebola, on Friday.

CDC Chief Announces New Shift In Ebola Protocols

In the latest tweak to America's plan to prevent the spread of the deadly Ebola disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leader Dr. Tom Frieden announced changes to the U.S. response to Ebola and the guidance federal agencies are giving to state and local governments.

A woman on the L train in New York City last week covers her face, fearful because a doctor with Ebola rode the train days earlier. Epidemiologists say people on the subway were not at risk.

New York's Disease Detectives Hit The Street In Search Of Ebola

A little-seen force has fanned out across New York City intent on stopping the spread of Ebola virus – disease detectives go looking for contacts who might be infected.

"They're just really good at finding people," says Denis Nash. He worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the New York City Health Department, tracing the spread of HIV and West Nile virus. He says these trained applied epidemiologists are experts at finding almost anybody, with only a vague description.

Caribous doing their business in mountain ice have left a viral record hundreds of years old.

Ancient Viruses Lurk In Frozen Caribou Poo

A careful examination of frozen caribou poop has turned up two never-before-seen viruses.

The viruses are hundreds of years old: One of them probably infected plants the caribous ate. The other may have infected insects that buzzed around the animals.

The findings prove viruses can survive for surprisingly long periods of time in a cold environment, according to Eric Delwart, a researcher at Blood Systems Research Institute in San Francisco.

U.S. Marines board a C-130 transport plane as they withdraw from Camp Leatherneck, their huge base in southern Afghanistan. This marked the biggest handover yet to the Afghan army, which is facing a tough fight with the Taliban in Helmand province and other parts of southern Afghanistan.

With Marines Gone, Can The Afghan Army Hold Off The Taliban?

The desert sun beat down on the U.S., British and Afghan troops gathered at Camp Leatherneck in Helmand province in southern Afghanistan. The Marines rolled up their flag as it came down, along with the NATO and British banners.

With the ceremony on Sunday, the Afghan army is now in command of Camp Leatherneck and neighboring Camp Bastion, the former British base.

Step 1: Start getting disappointed.

Sandwich (Replacement) Monday: Soylent

My sister Natalie recently had a birthday, and a friend who hates her sent her a packet of Soylent, the powdered meal of the future containing all the boring nutrients we need to live.

Congolese editor Solange Lusiku Nsimire says journalism is a powerful way of building and preserving her troubled country's "collective memory."

A Congolese Mother Of Six Is Honored For Her Death-Defying Journalism

"Journalism is my calling, the print media is my struggle and independence is my motto," says 42-year-old Solange Lusiku Nsimire, a Congolese editor and mother of six.

A man poses with a sign in front of police officers in riot gear during a demonstration calling on the government to rescue the kidnapped girls of a government secondary school in Chibok, in Abuja, Nigeria, on Tuesday.

Reports: Boko Haram May Have Kidnapped Dozens More Girls In Nigeria

According to reports this morning, armed militants with the extremist group Boko Haram have continued to abduct young girls in Nigeria.

Remember, earlier this month there was hope that the abductions would stop when the government announced a truce with the group. The deal was supposed to culminate in the release of the 276 school girls the group kidnapped in April.

CVS Pulls Apple Pay, And Many See A Fight Over Mobile Wallets

One week after Apple's new mobile payment system, Apple Pay, debuted in CVS stores, CVS has backtracked and barred its use. Rite Aid took the same step, leading many observers to note that the two companies are part of a group of retailers that's developing its own payment system, called CurrentC. Partners include Wal-Mart, Best Buy and 7-Eleven.

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