National News

Tori Sisson, left, and Shante Wolfe, right, exchange wedding rings during their ceremony, Feb. 9, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala. They were the first couple to file their marriage license in Montgomery County. Such marriage licenses appear to be on hold again following a state Supreme Court ruling on Tuesday.

Alabama Supreme Court Again Halts Gay Marriage

The Alabama Supreme Court once again has instructed probate judges not to issue marriage licenses.

In a 134-page opinion, seven of the nine justices said the U.S. Constitution "does not require one definition of marriage."

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama unveiled the Let Girls Learn program at the East Room of the White House on Tuesday.

Peace Corps Teams Up With First Lady To 'Let Girls Learn'

First lady Michelle Obama announced Tuesday a new effort to address a longstanding problem: Across the developing world, more than 60 million girls are not in school.

A waitress serves shark fin soup in a restaurant in Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province on Aug. 10, 2014.

Why Shark Finning Bans Aren't Keeping Sharks Off The Plate (Yet)

For decades, sharks have gotten a raw deal on the high seas, where fishermen have butchered them alive by the hundreds of millions and thrown their carcasses overboard, keeping only the prized fins to sell to Asian markets. This gruesome practice — called finning — has come under fire from conservationists, who say the shark fin trade has decimated species like silky, oceanic whitetip and dusky sharks around the world.

The Clinton Foundation has taken contributions, of $1 million to $10 million, from the governments of Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates. The Saudi Arabian government has given as much as $25 million.

Clinton Foundation Funding Woes Touch Hillary, Too

With assets approaching $226 million, the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation plays a prominent role in international development. It has battled HIV/AIDS, provided relief after tsunamis and earthquakes and helped farmers and entrepreneurs in developing countries.

"And we believe that together we can find solutions to the most daunting human challenges," says the narrator in a promotional video for the foundation. "This is what we do. This is who we are. This is the Clinton Foundation."

But another passage in the video oddly foreshadows a current controversy.

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act celebrate outside the Supreme Court in 2012, after a divided court upheld the law as constitutional by a 5-to-4 vote. The latest battle, which the Supreme Court hears Wednesday, is over whether people who buy insurance through federally run exchanges are eligible for subsidies.

Round 2: Health Care Law Faces The Supreme Court Again

Round 2 in the legal battle over Obamacare hits the Supreme Court's intellectual boxing ring Wednesday.

In one corner is the Obama administration, backed by the nation's hospitals, insurance companies, physician associations and other groups like Catholic Charities and the American Cancer Society.

In the other corner are conservative groups, backed by politicians who fought in Congress to prevent the bill from being adopted.

When lawyer Thomas Goldstein contended that innkeepers keep guest information anyway to stay in touch with their customers, Justice Scalia cut in: "Motel 6 does this? Jeez, I've never received anything from them!"

Should Hotel Owners Be Forced To Hand Over Guest Records To Police?

Hypotheticals about hunting lodges and Motel 6 saved the oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday from being strangled by legal weeds.

At issue was a Los Angeles ordinance that requires hotel and motel owners to record various pieces of information about their guests — drivers license, credit card and automobile tags, for instance. The hotel owners don't dispute they have to do that; what they do dispute is the part of the law that requires proprietors to make this information available to any member of the Los Angeles Police Department upon demand.

Republican Speaker of the House John Boehner pauses at a news conference announcing the House's latest vote to repeal Obamacare in February.

4 Reasons Both Parties Should Be Sweating Bullets Over King V. Burwell

The Supreme Court will hear arguments on Wednesday in another case that threatens the survival of Obamacare. This one doesn't challenge the constitutionality of the law itself, it merely challenges the legality of one of the most important parts of the system — subsidies so that everyone can afford health care. If the court strikes down the subsidies for people who live in states that chose not to set up their own exchanges, and who get their health coverage from the federal marketplace — healthcare.gov — it would begin to unravel the entire Obamacare project.

AndroGel, a testosterone replacement made by AbbVie, is seen at a pharmacy in Princeton, Ill.

FDA Mandates Tougher Warnings On Testosterone

The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it is requiring drugmakers to warn patients that testosterone products may increase the risk for heart attacks and strokes.

Testosterone replacements are approved to treat men with low testosterone related to medical problems, such as genetic deficiencies, chemotherapy or damaged testicles.

FAA Is Trying To Keep Hackers Out Of Air Traffic Control, Official Says

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta told Congress Tuesday his agency is implementing changes to ensure the nation's air traffic control system is protected against computer hackers. Huerta told a House panel "the system is safe," despite a Government Accountability Office report that found "significant security control weaknesses."

Ismael Medjdoub grew up in one of Paris' <em>banlieues</em>. He spends up to two hours a day commuting from his home in Tremblay en France to work and to school at the prestigious Sorbonne in Paris.

In France, Young Muslims Often Straddle Two Worlds

The French, with their national motto of "liberty, equality, fraternity," are so against religious and ethnic divisions that the government doesn't even collect this kind of data on its citizens, but it's believed that nearly 40 percent of the country's 7 million Muslims live in and around Paris.

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