National News

Unions Mobilize To Fight Political Novice In Illinois' GOP Primary

Balancing College Dreams With The Reality Of Finances

Negotiators Gather In Vienna For Talks On Iran's Nukes

Syrian Conflict Marches Into Fourth Year

Investigation Into Missing Malaysian Jet Expands

Campaign workers and other political operatives are trying to find ways to use Google Glass on the campaign trail.

Google Glass: Coming Soon To A Campaign Trail Near You

Google Glass is looking to be the next must-have digital device. The small computer you wear like eyeglasses allows you to surf the web, email, text, take photos, shoot and stream live video and more — hands-free.

For now Google Glass is in very limited release, but even so, political professionals are eagerly exploring how it could become a powerful campaign tool.

At the Lenox Academy in Brooklyn, N.Y., educators try to teach kids to see struggle as a normal part of learning.

Does Teaching Kids To Get 'Gritty' Help Them Get Ahead?

It's become the new buzz phrase in education: "Got grit?"

Around the nation, schools are beginning to see grit as key to students' success — and just as important to teach as reading and math.

Experts define grit as persistence, determination and resilience; it's that je ne sais quoi that drives one kid to practice trumpet or study Spanish for hours — or years — on end, while another quits after the first setback.

Garrett shares a moment with his mother, Natalie Peterson. "He has been doing so good," she says. "He's been smiling."

Doctors Use 3-D Printing To Help A Baby Breathe

Ever since the day Garrett Peterson was born, his parents have had to watch him suddenly just stop breathing.

"He could go from being totally fine to turning blue sometimes — not even kidding — in 30 seconds," says Garrett's mother, Natalie Peterson, 25, of Layton, Utah. "It was so fast. It was really scary."

Paying For College: No Easy Answers For Many Families

The math is clear: College pays off.

Among Americans ages 25 to 32, college graduates earned $17,500 more than high school graduates in 2012 — the largest pay differential ever, according to Pew Research. When it comes to earnings, "the picture is consistently bleaker for less-educated workers," the Pew study concluded.

Dr. Kamal Kalsi had to apply for special permission from the Department of Defense in order to keep his beard and turban while serving in the military.

Uniform Rule May Keep Religious Americans From Military Service

Monday, 105 lawmakers from both parties sent a letter to Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, urging him to change a relatively obscure uniform requirement for the U.S. armed forces that some argue infringes on religious beliefs.

People who observe religions that require specific hair or dress traditions have to seek an accommodation from a superior to break the Defense Department's uniform requirements.

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