National News

Patrolling the U.S.-Mexico border can be dangerous. Still, critics say there isn't enough public accountability when Border Patrol agents use deadly force.

U.S. Border Patrol's Response To Violence In Question

Picnickers in a riverside park in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, react in horror as a man in a yellow baseball cap named Guillermo Arevalo lies on the bank of the Rio Grande, bleeding to death.

It's a warm Monday evening in September 2012. He has just been shot by an agent on a U.S. Border Patrol airboat on the river. The Border Patrol says the agent shot at rock throwers and that the incident is under investigation.

An anti-government protester waves the Thai flag during a rally in Bangkok, on Wednesday.

Attack In Thai Capital Leaves Two Dead, A Score Wounded

An attack on anti-government protesters in Thailand's capital, Bangkok, has left at least two people dead and more than 20 wounded, Thai authorities say.

The incident marks renewed violence between supporters and opponents of ousted Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who was removed from her post last week by the country's Constitutional Court along with nine of her cabinet ministers. Her Pheu Thai party, however, remains in power.

The Associated Press writes:

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks during a news conference after attending the Gulf Cooperation Council meeting in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, on Wednesday. Hagel confirmed that the U.S. was using drones to search for 270 kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls.

Hagel: U.S. Drones Searching For Kidnapped Nigerian Schoolgirls

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said Wednesday that the U.S. is using surveillance drones to try to locate more than 270 kidnapped schoolgirls in Nigeria.

"We are now providing unmanned reconnaissance intelligence over Nigeria and we'll continue to do that," Hagel told reporters in Saudi Arabia at a meeting of the Gulf Cooperation Council.

In Kansas, Professors Must Now Watch What They Tweet

The Kansas Board of Regents gave final approval Wednesday to a strict new policy on what employees may say on social media. Critics say the policy violates both the First Amendment and academic freedom, but school officials say providing faculty with more specific guidelines will actually bolster academic freedom on campus.

The controversial policy was triggered by an equally controversial tweet posted last September by David Guth, an associate journalism professor. Reacting to a lone gunman who killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., he wrote:

Regulators Couldn't Close U.S. Mine Despite Poor Safety Record

The West Virginia mine where two workers were fatally injured on Monday consistently violated federal mine safety laws, but federal regulators say they were unable to shut it down completely.

The Mine Safety and Health Administration confirmed that two workers were killed on May 12 when coal and rocks burst from mine walls at Patriot Coal's Brody No. 1 mine in Boone County, W.Va.

A woman casts her ballot at a polling station on May 11 in Hartsizk, Ukraine. Pro-Russian separatists are claiming independence after the referendum in cities across eastern Ukraine.

After Referendum In Eastern Ukraine, Different Visions Emerge

In eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian separatists are claiming independence based on a victory in a hastily organized referendum. Now, they're resisting a nationwide presidential election that's scheduled for May 25.

With Russian troops still massed near the border, Ukrainian and international mediators are trying to find a solution for the crisis.

There are some very different visions of the future for the volatile region.

Dianne Feinstein, chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, speaks to reporters in April. She tells NPR she's "not particularly" comfortable with the CIA vetting the "Torture Report."

Feinstein Wants CIA To Speed 'Torture Report' Release

It's been well over a month since the Senate Intelligence Committee voted 11 to 3 to declassify and make public the executive summary and findings of its "Torture Report."

But it's not likely that will actually happen anytime soon.

The reason? The CIA — the very agency skewered in the 6,200-page report for its interrogation and detention of more than 100 terrorism suspects from 2001 through 2008 — has been given the job of deciding what to leave in and what to take out of the summary and findings.

And the CIA seems to be in no great rush to finish that job.

How Food Companies Court Nutrition Educators With Junk Food

When hundreds of California nutritionists and dietitians gathered for their annual conference in April, their Friday lunch was a bacon ranch salad, chocolate chip cookies and a pink yogurt parfait, all courtesy of McDonald's.

A helicopter attacks a wildfire burning in the north county of San Diego on Tuesday.

Fires In Southern California Force More Evacuations

Thousands of residents in Southern California were fleeing their homes after being told by authorities to evacuate as wind-swept wildfires raged in several areas.

Officials sent out more than 11,000 mandatory evacuation notices in the city of Carlsbad, where a wildfire erupted on Wednesday — one of several in recent days in San Diego County that have threatened life and property.

State officials say the record-high temperatures were a contributing factor to the rash of wildfires.

Helicopters were being used to drop water on the fires.

Muslim pilgrims wears masks to prevent infection from the Middle East Respiratory syndrome in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday.

How U.S. Hospitals Are Planning To Stop The Deadly MERS Virus

In the past month, Middle East Respiratory syndrome has morphed from a little-known disease in the Arabian Peninsula to a major global health concern, with more than 300 cases in Saudi Arabia in April, 54 of them fatal.

Two cases have been reported in the U.S. as well — one in Indiana and one in Florida. Both men had worked in Saudi Arabia hospitals. So far, neither has spread the respiratory disease to others.

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