National News

On Base And In Town, Shooting Summons A Dread All Too Familiar

What's Known — And Still Unclear — About The Fort Hood Shooting

Consuming anywhere from about 2,600 milligrams up to almost 5,000 milligrams of sodium per day is associated with more favorable health outcomes, a study finds.

Time To Relax The Sodium Guidelines? Some Docs Say Not So Fast

We've all heard the advice to go easy on the salt shaker. Or, perhaps, more importantly, to cut back on eating packaged, processed foods that often contain a lot of salt.

And why? There's a lot of evidence linking excessive sodium intake to high blood pressure, which increases the risk of heart disease.

The Dietary Guidelines recommend that adults should consume no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day.

A strong majority of young voters support the Affordable Care Act, according to a new NPR poll. In March 2014, models handed out juice shots to encourage individuals — and especially young people — to sign up for health insurance.

NPR Poll: GOP's Older Voter Advantage Slips From 4 Years Ago

The new NPR poll had good news for Republicans and Democrats. As NPR correspondent Mara Liasson reported for Morning Edition, likely voters were nearly split evenly between support and opposition to the Affordable Care Act, with 51 percent against and 47 percent for.

Fort Hood

Should Soldiers Be Armed At Military Posts?

For John Lott, Wednesday's mass shooting at Fort Hood was a test of personal beliefs that struck uncomfortably close to home.

His son is serving at Fort Hood and was close enough to the activity hear shots and screaming.

But he wasn't in a position to respond. Department of Defense policy forbids soldiers and sailors, in most circumstances, from carrying weapons at installations.

That frustrates Lott. For years, he has been promoting the idea — including in his book More Guns, Less Crime — that relaxing gun restrictions would make for a safer society.

Senate Panel Votes To Declassify Report On CIA Interrogations

A Senate panel voted on Thursday to declassify a controversial report on the interrogation techniques used by the Central Intelligence Agency during the presidency of George W. Bush.

In a statement announcing the vote, Sen. Diane Feinstein, the Democratic chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said the report "exposes brutality that stands in stark contrast to our values as a nation."

A key, symbolizing the Palestinians who lost their homes at the creation of the state of Israel in 1948, sits at the entrance of the West Bank city of Jericho, on Feb. 22.

Stay Or Go: How Israeli-Palestinian Peace Would Redefine Home

More than 1 million Arabs are citizens of Israel. And over the years, some 350,000 Jewish Israelis have moved to settlements in the West Bank. If the Israelis and Palestinians were to make peace and set a formal border, what would happen to all these people?

Could this be the end of grass and gesundheit?

A Pill For Grass Allergies May Replace Shots For Some

Later this spring, allergy sufferers will have access to a new form of help: a pill that can replace allergy shots. But the pill works only for grass allergies, and it's not clear how much it's going to cost.

The Food and Drug Administration just approved Oralair, the first sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for use in the United States. That's how regulators describe a pill that you stick under your tongue to tamp down your immune system.

A stuffed bear sits with other items found nearby Wednesday atop a tractor that landed at the edge of the debris field in a deadly mudslide in Oso, Wash.

Washington Mudslide Death Toll Rises To 30

The official death toll from last month's landslide in Washington state has risen to 30, according to local officials, with more than a dozen still listed as missing.

The Snohomish County medical examiner's office released the names of two more victims: 67-year-old Gloria Halstead and 13-year-old Jovon E. Mangual, both of Arlington. Of the 30 confirmed victims, three have yet to be identified.

A book street vendor passes the time on her smart phone as she waits for customers in Havana, Cuba, on Tuesday. The Obama administration secretly financed a social network in Cuba to stir political unrest.

White House: Creation Of 'Cuban Twitter' Was Not Covert Program

The funding of a social media platform designed to undermine the Cuban government was not a covert American operation, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said during his regular press briefing on Thursday.

"The program referred to by the Associated Press was a development program run by the United States agency for International Development and that program was completed in 2012," Carney said. "As you know, USAID is a development agency not an intelligence agency."

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