National News

Women walk past election posters of Syria's President Bashar Assad on a Damascus street on Monday. Despite the civil war, the election will be held Tuesday in areas controlled by Assad's government. Assad became president after his father's death in 2000 and is assured of winning a third seven-year term.

What Syria's President Seeks From A Not-So-Democratic Election

The Turkish border city of Gaziantep becomes more Syrian by the day. New waves of refugees have arrived since January. In the market, Syrian craftsman hammer out copper pots and plates, as they did back home in Aleppo.

"We left to save our children," says Ali Abu Hassan. "The bombs come every day."

There are 96 languages spoken across the Los Angeles Unified School District; 49% of California's young children have an immigrant parent.

Reaching Immigrant Children By Helping Their Parents

At our neighborhood playground in Brooklyn, you can hear kids shouting and playing in Russian, Spanish, Yiddish, Tagalog, French, Hebrew, Vietnamese, Cantonese and Polish. This kind of giddy cacophony has been par for the course in New York City for 150 years, but it's becoming more and more common across the country.

A sign supporting Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is seen in Hailey, Idaho, on Sunday. Bergdahl, the sole American prisoner of war held in Afghanistan, was flown to a U.S. military hospital in Germany on Sunday after being freed in a swap deal for five Taliban militants who were released from the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.

In Bowe Bergdahl's Release, As Many Questions As Answers

The release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in exchange for five senior members of the Taliban has been both welcomed as well as criticized.

Here's a look at why the release of a prisoner of war, usually a cause for unalloyed celebration, is proving so divisive.

Who is Bowe Bergdahl?

Harriette Thompson meets the press at the finish line of the Suja Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Marathon on Sunday

91-Year-Old Woman Breaks Marathon Record

It took Harriette Thompson more than seven hours to run a marathon Sunday in San Diego. But that was awfully good, considering she's 91 and recovering from cancer.

In fact, she beat the previous record for women 90 and up by two hours and 45 minutes. She also became the second-oldest woman to complete a marathon in U.S. history, according to the running site Competitor.com.

Fabien Cousteau sits inside Aquarius Reef Base in 2012. If he is able to remain under water for 31 days, he will have lasted one day longer than his grandfather, Jacques Cousteau.

Jacques Cousteau's Grandson Plans To Spend A Month Underwater

Fabien Cousteau has been following in his grandfather Jacques Cousteau's flipper-steps for years — scuba diving around the world and making underwater documentaries of his own. Now he's seeking to break the elder oceanographer's record for the longest period of time spent underwater.

Twigs and leaves from chokecherries are high in vitamin K, fiber and calcium.

Native Americans Have Superfoods Right Under Their Feet

On American Indian reservations, the traditional diet of wild plants and game for food is increasingly being replaced with a far less healthful diet of predominantly high-carb, high-sugar foods.

Along the way, obesity and type 2 diabetes rates have soared. At nearly 16 percent, American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest prevalence of diabetes among all U.S. racial and ethnic groups, according to the American Diabetes Association.

A postman has been accused of stealing credit cards, Netflix movies, and other items. The U.S. Postal Service says a search of Jeffrey L. Shipley's home found his apartment had bags of mail in it.

Mailman Accused Of Stealing 20,000 Pieces Of Mail

For some folks in Catonsville, Md., it must have seemed like their mail was disappearing into a black hole. Passports, money orders and Mother's Day cards are among the items a U.S. Postal Service worker is accused of stealing in the town near Baltimore.

Officials say mail carrier Jeffrey L. Shipley stole 20,000 items during a postal career that began in 1993.

From The Baltimore Sun:

Cigna's letter to Julie Rovner saying she had no proof of past coverage, so limitations based on pre-existing conditions could apply. (Highlights added.)

Are Pre-Existing Condition Bans For Health Insurance Still With Us?

"Welcome to Cigna," said the letter, dated May 16, on behalf of my new employer, the Kaiser Family Foundation. The letter also said the insurer was placing me on a one-year waiting period for any pre-existing conditions.

Seriously? Wasn't the health law supposed to end that?

"We have reviewed the evidence of prior creditable coverage provided by you and/or your prior carrier and have determined that you have 0 days of creditable coverage," the letter said.

'Drunk Mom' Tackles New Motherhood And Old Addictions

'Harvest Of Shame': Farm Workers Struggle With Poverty 50 Years On

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