National News

In Paris, soldiers patrol at Charles de Gaulle airport last week. French airports have reportedly agreed to a new TSA policy requiring electronic devices to be powered up before they're allowed on U.S.-bound flights.

TSA Tightens Rules For Devices At Overseas Airports

People flying to the U.S. on international flights might want to keep their cellphones charged: Under a new policy, these and other devices might not be allowed on the plane if they can't power up.

The Transportation Security Administration says its new guideline is aimed at certain airports that have direct flights to the U.S. Officials at those overseas facilities should require passengers to turn on electronic devices before they're allowed to board, the TSA says.

Palestinians inspect a damaged building after an Israeli air strike in Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza Strip on Sunday.

Hamas Vows Revenge For Fighters Killed In Air Attack

The Islamic militant group Hamas says it will avenge the deaths of seven militants who reportedly were killed as a result of Israeli air strikes in the Gaza Strip. Israel says the strikes were retaliation for a burst of rocket fire from Gaza into southern Israel.

From Jerusalem, Daniel Estrin reports:

Stressed Out: Americans Tell Us About Stress In Their Lives

Everyone seems to talk about feeling stressed out. But what's the reality of stress in America these days?

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find out.

Our questions zeroed in on the effect of stress in Americans' lives. We asked about people's personal experiences with stress in the preceding month and year. We also asked about how they perceived the effects of stress, how they cope with stress and their attitudes about it.

Then-Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze flashes a "V" sign in France in 1989, after attending the International Conference on Chemical Weapons. Shevardnadze died Monday at age 86.

Eduard Shevardnadze, Former Georgian President, Dies At 86

Former Soviet minister and Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze, who is credited with helping end the Cold War, died Monday after a long illness, his spokeswoman tells the media.

To remind you of the former leader's career, NPR's Corey Flintoff has this report for our Newscast unit:

"White-haired and dapper, Eduard Shevardnadze was the face of Soviet foreign policy during the era when President Mikhail Gorbachev was attempting to liberalize the Communist bloc.

This undated file photo released by Obama for America shows Barack Obama teaching at the University of Chicago Law School in Chicago, where he was a faculty member for more than a decade. The university is contending for his presidential library.

A Presidential Contest ... For Obama's Library

There are 13 presidential Libraries in the United States run by the National Archives and when President Obama leaves office, the construction of the 14th library won't be far behind.

A nonprofit foundation created to fund and build the Obama presidential library is already beginning to mull proposals from contenders who'd like to be home to the facility.

For Many Americans, Stress Takes A Toll On Health And Family

Stress is part of the human condition, unavoidable and even necessary to a degree. But too much stress can be toxic — even disabling.

And there's a lot of toxic stress out there.

A national poll done by NPR with our partners at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that more than 1 in every 4 Americans say they had a great deal of stress in the previous month.

Charlotte Smith, of Champoeg Creamery in St. Paul, Ore., says raw milk may offer health benefits. But she also acknowledges its very real dangers.

Raw Milk Producers Aim To Regulate Themselves

A growing number of Americans are buying raw milk. That's milk that has not been pasteurized to kill bacteria.

Sgt. Jarrod Simmons speaks to his squad of Marines before they head out on a training march with 55-pound packs on Feb. 22, 2013, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines and the other military branches must open combat jobs to women in 2016. More than 160 female Marines are taking part in a grueling training program that begins this summer.

The Marines Are Looking For A Few Good (Combat-Ready) Women

The challenge for the Marines, and for the Army, is how to open up ground combat jobs to women in January 2016, without lowering standards.

And here's where things stand in the Marines.

Eighty-five female Marines already made it through an infantry training course last fall at Camp Lejeune, N.C., which included drills such as attacking a mock enemy force, hidden in a pine forest. That course lasted eight weeks, and the men and women all completed the same training.

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's Five 'Promise Zones'

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

The recent Supreme Court term resulted in an unusual number of unanimous decisions — but that doesn't mean there wasn't disagreement.

Rare Unanimity In Supreme Court Term, With Plenty Of Fireworks

The nation greets the coming of July each year with fireworks on the National Mall and, days earlier, explosive decisions at the U.S. Supreme Court.

While the Mall fireworks dissipate within moments, the court's decisions will have repercussions for decades. Indeed, no sooner was the ink dry on this term's contraceptive decision than the court's three female justices accused their male colleagues of reneging.

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