National News

The U.S. tax code, which dates back to the days of Ozzie and Harriet, works against dual-income spouses. In some cases, it's cheaper for one spouse to stay home.

Outdated Tax Code Gives Some Working Spouses A Bad Deal

Women today are nearly half the workforce, and two-income couples are the norm. But the U.S. tax code? It's straight out of Ozzie and Harriet.

When it comes to paying taxes, economists say a lot of secondary wage-earners are getting a raw deal. It's called the marriage penalty.

"The system was never designed to penalize working spouses," says Melissa Kearney, director of the Hamilton Project at The Brookings Institution. "It was just designed in a different era."

Do any of these students remember what Vice President Joe Biden said in June 2012?

Keep It Brief, Commencement Speakers! No One Will Remember Anyway

It's that time of year when colleges and universities send out press releases touting which coveted commencement speakers they've snagged.

President Obama will deliver the address at University of California, Irvine. Vice President Joe Biden will speak at the University of South Carolina. Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg will urge graduates at City Colleges of Chicago to lean in and listen.

But will anyone actually remember what they say?

Edmond Aviv, 62, sits with a sign at a street corner in the Cleveland suburb of South Euclid Sunday. Aviv, who called his neighbor "monkey momma" as she held her adopted, disabled African-American children, was ordered by a judge to display the sign.

'Bully' Serves His Punishment: Holding Sign In Public

The sign tells the story.

"I am a bully," it reads. "I pick on children that are disabled, and I am intolerant of those that are different from myself. My actions do not reflect an appreciation for the diverse South Euclid community that I live in."

That sign was displayed next to a busy roadside in a Cleveland suburb Sunday by Edmond Aviv, after a court found that he had abused his neighbors with racial slurs and vandalism that sometimes included dog feces.

President Obama signs two executive actions aimed at closing the gender pay gap, including an order to combat "pay secrecy," on April 8.

'Pay Secrecy' Policies At Work: Often Illegal, And Misunderstood

President Obama says his administration is fighting to close the gender wage gap, the gulf between what working men and women earn for the same job.

Last week, Obama moved to circumvent a divided Congress on the issue. He announced two executive actions promoting the idea of "equal pay for equal work," both directed at creating more transparency in the workplace.

For one, the president directed the Department of Labor to collect more information on what federal contractors pay their employees, "so pay discrimination can be spotted more easily."

A Dutch filmmaker has updated his time-lapse video project, showing his daughter growing from a a chubby-cheeked baby into a braces-wearing teenager.

A Girl Ages From 0 To 14 Years Old, In 4 Minutes

A Dutch filmmaker has updated one of the more compelling uses of time-lapse photography techniques online. Frans Hofmeester has filmed his daughter, Lotte, every week since her birth in 1999. He recently posted a video that shows her on a white background, growing from a chubby-cheeked baby into a braces-wearing teenager.

Initial results released by Afghan officials show former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah with a narrow lead over former finance minister Ashraf Ghani, in a tight presidential election.

Early Afghan Election Results Set Candidates Posturing

Initial results from Afghanistan's April 5 presidential election show two candidates — Abdullah Abdullah and Ashraf Ghani — far ahead of their rivals. Election officials released the figures Sunday, based on less than 7 percent of the total vote.

Though the sample released Sunday represented a small fraction of the estimated 7 million votes cast, that hasn't stopped the leading candidates from posturing about the final outcome, as NPR's Sean Carberry reports from Kabul:

Jordan Spieth lines up a putt  during the third round of the 2014 Masters on Saturday.

In Jordan Spieth, Golf World Looks For Its Next Tiger — Again

The golf world loves discovering a player who might be the Next Big Thing, someone who could take Tiger Woods' place someday as world's best golfer.

This weekend's Masters at Augusta National could be on the verge of serving up the newest candidate.

A customer eyes marijuana samples at a Denver dispensary. The makers of a newly unveiled vending machine are hoping to change how pot is sold in stores.

Marijuana Vending Machine Unveiled In Colorado

An automated pot-selling machine was unveiled at an event held at an Avon, Colo., restaurant Saturday, promising a potential new era of selling marijuana and pot-infused snacks from vending machines directly to customers.

Its creators say the machine, called the ZaZZZ, uses biometrics to verify a customer's age. The machine is climate-controlled to keep its product fresh.

Using a projector, Jodi Doyle points out shadows on the ceiling to students in her preschool class at the Eliot School in Boston. Boston has become a beacon for the universal preschool movement, but so far it can only provide seats for about half the interested families.

Boston Finds That Quality Preschool Is Worth The Effort

It's a Wednesday morning at the Eliot K-8 Innovation School. Teacher Jodi Doyle is working with a small group of preschool students interested in domes.

"What do you think the difference is between a dome and an arch?" she asks.

The lesson doesn't go exactly as planned. Doyle wants the kids to build their domes with wire, but she wants the children to come up with that idea themselves. The kids used wire several months ago for a related project, and she hopes they'll remember.

The U.S., the IMF's most powerful member, has refused to sign off on reforms. On Saturday, global leaders suggested the IMF would turn to other options if Congress doesn't act by year's end.

Frustrated With Congress, IMF Heads Leave D.C. With Budding Idea

As far as looks go, Washington turned in a dazzling performance as host city for this past week's meetings at the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

Cherry blossoms peaked, tulips popped, and the air carried the sweet scent of hyacinths.

But politics-wise, Washington let down its global guests. They came begging Congress to approve a package of IMF reforms, but are leaving Sunday with nothing.

"We are all very disappointed by the ongoing failure to bring these reforms to conclusion," Australia's Treasurer Joe Hockey told reporters.

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