National News

Supreme Court Rejects Texas Standard For Mental Disability In Capital Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the state of Texas has been using an unconstitutional and obsolete medical standard for determining whether those convicted of murder are exempt from the death penalty because of mental deficiency.

The 5-to-3 decision came in the case of Bobby James Moore, who killed a store clerk in in Houston in 1980 during a botched robbery.

U.S. Postal Service mail carrier Thomas Russell holds a census form while working his route in 2010.

Run-Up To Census 2020 Raises Concerns Over Security And Politics

Updated 10:30 p.m. ET

About three years from now, the U.S. government is going to start asking some personal questions. The possible topics of those questions were released on Tuesday as part of the run-up to the 2020 Census, the national head count of every resident in the U.S. required by the Constitution every 10 years.

U.N. Human Rights Investigators Killed In Democratic Republic Of The Congo

The United Nations has confirmed that two of its employees, who were looking into violence and human rights abuses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, have been killed.

An American, Michael Sharp, and a Swede, Zaida Catalan, had gone missing earlier this month while traveling in the region. Tuesday, Congolese officials said their bodies, along with that of their interpreter, had been found in Central Kasai province.

Summer Zervos, shown with attorney Gloria Allred earlier this year in Washington, D.C., accuses President Trump of sexual harassment and has filed a lawsuit against him.

Trump Lawyers Claim Immunity In Sex Harassment Suit, Just As Bill Clinton Did

The Constitution and the Supreme Court both say a president is largely immune from civil lawsuits. The chief executive does critical work leading the nation, the logic goes, and shouldn't be bedeviled by ordinary civil lawsuits.

That's the argument that President Bill Clinton used almost exactly 20 years ago, when he tried but failed to stop the sexual harassment suit brought by Paula Jones. Now it's being made by lawyers for President Trump, against a sexual harassment suit brought by Summer Zervos, a former contestant on Trump's TV show The Apprentice.

Mississippi Journalist Who Chronicled Civil Rights Era Dies At 94

Wilson "Bill" Minor, an investigative reporter and syndicated columnist who documented Mississippi politics for almost seven decades, has died at 94, The Associated Press reports.

Minor was an institution, inspiring awe from fellow reporters for the depth of his knowledge — and the astonishing length of his career.

Bill Kochevar received an implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating system that allowed him to move limbs he hadn't been able to move in eight years.

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts To Control His Own Arm And Hand

A paralyzed man has regained the use of his arm and hand using a system that decodes his thoughts and controls his muscles.

"I thought about moving my arm and I could move it," says Bill Kochevar, 56. "I ate a pretzel, I drank water," he says in a video produced by Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.

Kochevar was paralyzed in a bicycle accident when he was in his 40s. And for the next eight years, he was unable to move any part of his body below his shoulders.

Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers.

As Congress Repeals Internet Privacy Rules, Putting Your Options In Perspective

President Trump is expected to sign into law a decision by Congress to overturn new privacy rules for Internet service providers.

Passed by the Federal Communications Commission in October, the rules never went into effect. If they had, it would have given consumers more control over how ISPs use the data they collect. Most notably, the rules would have required explicit consent from consumers if sensitive data — like financial or health information, or browsing history — were to be shared or sold.

Congress on Tuesday rolled back Internet privacy regulations established under the Obama administration.

Congress Overturns Internet Privacy Regulation

The House of Representatives has gone along with the Senate and voted 215-205 to overturn a yet-to-take-effect regulation that would have required Internet service providers — like Comcast, Verizon and Charter — to get consumers' permission before selling their data.

President Trump is expected to sign the rollback, according to a White House statement.

Volunteers gather bags of groceries for people seeking assistance at a food pantry in Concord, Mass. Many groups that help low-income families get food aid say they've seen an alarming drop recently in the number of immigrants applying for help.

Deportation Fears Prompt Immigrants To Cancel Food Stamps

Groups that help low-income families get food assistance are alarmed by a recent drop in the number of immigrants seeking help. Some families are even canceling their food stamps and other government benefits, for fear that receiving them will affect their immigration status or lead to deportation. Many of the concerns appear to be unfounded but have been fueled by the Trump administration's tough stance on immigration.

Protesters participate in an anti-corruption rally in St. Petersburg on March 26. Thousands of Russians demonstrated across the country to protest corruption.

What Russia's Protests Mean For Putin's Opposition

Russians are still trying to understand exactly what happened over the weekend, when thousands of people — many of them teenagers — turned out for anti-government rallies in dozens of cities across the country.

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