National News

Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo., a day before Game 1 of the 2014 World Series.

A Tale Of Two Cities: World Series Fever Takes Hold In SF, KC

Millions of baseball fans and two cities 1,500 miles apart are getting ready for tonight's big game in Kansas City, Mo. The Royals are in their first World Series in nearly three decades. They face the San Francisco Giants, who are back again after missing their chance at the series last year.

Robert Snyder takes a break at Baia de Guanabara, Brazil's second largest bay.

Volunteer Recap: Why Wearing The Right Shoes In Rio Matters

Public health student Robert Snyder says he's been back and forth between U.S. and Brazil at least six times. While some trips were for fun, others were to study how diseases affect some of the country's poorest communities.

The California Public Employees' Retirement System has capped how much it will pay for some common medical procedures and tests.

More Insurers Put Spending Limits On Medical Treatments

To clamp down on health care costs, a growing number of employers and insurers are putting limits on how much they'll pay for certain medical services such as knee replacements, lab tests and complex imaging.

A recent study found that savings from such moves may be modest, however, and some analysts question whether "reference pricing," as it's called, is good for consumers.

When Women Stopped Coding

Modern computer science is dominated by men. But it hasn't always been this way.

A lot of computing pioneers — the people who programmed the first digital computers — were women. And for decades, the number of women studying computer science was growing faster than the number of men. But in 1984, something changed. The percentage of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged, even as the share of women in other technical and professional fields kept rising.

What happened?

Protesters rail outside the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center on opening night of the opera "The Death of Klinghoffer" on Monday in New York.

Opera About 1985 Achille Lauro Hijacking Draws Protests At Met

Former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani was among those who showed up at the Metropolitan Opera last night to denounce the production of The Death of Klinghoffer, which protesters say glorifies terrorism.

Chanting "Shame on the Met!" protesters, numbering about 400, said the performance of the 23-year-old opera was an affront to the memory of Leon Klinghoffer, a passenger on the Italian cruise liner Achille Lauro that was hijacked by members of the Palestinian Liberation Organization in 1985. Klinghoffer, 69, was shot in his wheelchair and dumped overboard.

French energy giant Total CEO Christophe de Margerie, posing prior to a press conference held in Paris on Feb. 13, 2013.

CEO Of French Oil Giant Total Dies In Plane Accident

Updated at 10:10 a.m. ET

The CEO of French oil company Total, Christophe de Margerie, died when his plane collided with a snowplow Monday night at a Moscow airport. He was 63.

Total posted a statement on its website:

Hong Kong Federation of Students council members attend a meeting with senior Hong Kong government officials in Hong Kong on Tuesday.

Hong Kong Leader Hints At Concessions As Talks With Students Begin

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Hong Kong's Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, at the start of talks today with student-led pro-democracy protesters, says although his Beijing-backed government cannot allow the public to nominate candidates to replace him in 2017, the process could be made "more democratic."

"There's room for discussion there," Leung told a small group of journalists on Tuesday. "There's room to make the nominating committee more democratic."

President Obama casts an early ballot for the midterm elections at the Dr. Martin Luther King Community Service Center in Chicago on Monday.

In Tight Races, Both Parties Bank On Early Votes

On the first day for in-person early voting in Illinois, President Obama went to the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center to cast his ballot.

"I'm so glad I can early vote here," he told the elections worker checking him in.

Early voting is something Democrats have used to their advantage in recent elections. And it's likely not a coincidence that Obama chose to vote in person, with cameras rolling and clicking, rather than quietly dropping an absentee ballot in the mail.

Some Millennials — And Their Parents — Are Slow To Cut The Cord

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

So your child moved back in with you after graduation, and it seems like she will never leave. Or worse, you're sending rent checks each month while she searches for jobs in the big city.

You often find yourself wondering if she will ever grow up. You're concerned that your child is suffering from delayed adolescence.

South African track star Oscar Pistorius is sentenced to five years in prison Tuesday for the fatal shooting of his girlfriend.

Oscar Pistorius Gets 5 Years In Prison For Killing Girlfriend

Updated at 7:35 a.m. ET

South African Paralympic and Olympic track star Oscar Pistorius has been sentenced to five years in prison for the fatal shooting of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.

Pistorius, 27, received a verdict of culpable homicide from a judge in South Africa in September — a conviction that could have put him in prison for 15 years.

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