National News

Hayat Boumeddiene in a 2010 mugshot.

Who Carried Out The Paris Attacks?

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

At least three assailants are alleged to have carried out the two separate attacks in and around Paris this week, and French intelligence has begun to draw strong links among them as well as to al-Qaida and its affiliates and offshoots in the Middle East.

A protester demonstrates for higher wages for fast food workers in Jackson, Miss., in December. Employers are hiring more people, but overall, the wages they're paying remain flat.

Employment Is Up. Paychecks, Not So Much

The U.S. economy saw the strongest job growth last year since 1999, according to statistics released Friday by the Department of Labor. The country gained another 252,000 jobs in December.

That's the good news — but this jobs report also dashed some hopes for fatter paychecks. Employers are hiring more people, but overall, the wages they're paying remain flat.

A month ago, it seemed wages were starting to pick up — but those November numbers were revised lower. In December, wages actually fell slightly.

Sketchucation: #EdPredictions For 2015

So what will happen in the education world this year? Last week we brought you some provocative predictions. We were also curious to see what you thought.

With a little magic from our illustrator, LA Johnson, here are a few of our favorites from the #EdPredictions hashtag:

A police officer carries flower tributes at the site of Friday's attack on a kosher market in Paris, France.

Authorities Search For Clues To Deadly Attacks In Paris

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

Authorities in France are trying to determine the whereabouts of a 26-year-old woman who is believed to be linked with one of three assailants killed during multiple attacks around Paris.

Boyd Dowler of the Green Bay Packers grabs a Bart Starr touchdown pass in the NFL championship game on Dec. 31, 1967. The "Ice Bowl," played in frigid temperatures, was won by the Packers 21-17.

As Dallas Comes To Town, Green Bay Remembers Historic 'Ice Bowl'

This weekend's NFL playoffs include a face-off between the Green Bay Packers and the Dallas Cowboys. That game is being billed as the second "Ice Bowl."

These teams have played each other often since that cold game in Dec. 31, 1967, but this is the first time since then they'll meet for a playoff at Lambeau Field.

The temperature that day was minus 15. But while it will be cold in Green Bay this Sunday, it won't be that cold.

James Snyder, director of the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, with Egon Schiele's 1915 work, Krumau Town Crescent I. It's one of about 1,000 works of Nazi-confiscated art the museum has received. The museum has no record of who owned the painting before it was taken by the Nazis. In some 40 cases, the museum has returned artworks when heirs were found.

7 Decades On, Israel Still Seeks Resolutions For 'Holocaust Art'

Before and during World War II, the Nazis seized up to 600,000 works of art from all across Europe. This has created a long-running drama that is still playing out from movie studios in Hollywood to museums in Israel.

If you saw last year's movie The Monuments Men, starring George Clooney, then you know the story line. Toward the end of the war, American and Allied forces sent teams on a treasure hunt through Europe.

Uzbek President Islam Karimov looks on as Russian President Vladimir Putin, unseen, speaks to the media after talks in Moscow in April 2013.

Courted By The U.S. And Russia, Uzbekistan Ignores Critics

Even as tensions have grown between the United States and Russia, both countries have worked with an autocratic leader who rules a strategic nation in Central Asia.

The country is Uzbekistan, and the leader is Islam Karimov, the 76-year-old former Communist Party boss who has been president since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Despite a long record of human rights violations, Uzbekistan has been a key partner for the United States during the Afghan War.

In Paris late Wednesday, a woman held a pen in the air during a memorial. Hundreds gathered to show solidarity with the cartoonists at <em>Charlie Hebdo</em>, where gunmen killed 12 people.

Why You're Not Seeing Those 'Charlie Hebdo' Cartoons

Wednesday's attack at the Paris office of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is thought to have been the work of killers who believe cartoons can be so offensive that they justified the murder of 12 people.

News organizations and people around the world obviously believe the opposite — that no one deserves to die just because he's rude, crude or otherwise obnoxious. Free speech includes the right to be offensive.

Keystone Supporters Hope Amendments Will Soften Pipeline Opposition

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Rocket Landing At Sea Was 'Close But No Cigar'

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