National News

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that an international treaty wasn't meant to be invoked in an assault case in Pennsylvania.

Chemical Weapons Law Doesn't Apply To Jilted Lover, Supreme Court Rules

Federal laws that were meant to prevent the international use of chemical weapons can't be applied to a woman who tried to poison her husband's mistress, the Supreme Court has ruled. Carol Anne Bond had smeared toxic chemicals in the hopes that the other woman would develop a rash.

The Supreme Court ruled that the federal law shouldn't have been used to prosecute Bond, as her actions were forbidden under state or local laws. The opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts.

Women smoke in a Moscow bar in May. Tough new anti-smoking rules took effect Sunday in Russia, banning smoking in bars, restaurants, and other public spaces.

Russia's Smokers Must Take It Outside, As Ban Begins

It's now illegal to light up in Russia's bars, restaurants, and other public spaces, as a national smoking ban went into effect this month. Russian officials say the ban could save 200,000 lives a year in a country known for having many heavy smokers.

In 2009, the Russian Federation consumed 2,786 cigarettes per capita, according to the Tobacco Atlas put out by the World Lung Foundation.

From Moscow, NPR's Corey Flintoff reports for our Newscast unit:

The EPA is proposing rules that would govern carbon dioxide gas emissions by U.S. power plants. Here, coal is transported via conveyor belt to the coal-fired Jim Bridger Power Plant outside Point of the Rocks, Wyo., in March.

EPA Unveils New Proposal Targeting Greenhouse Gases

New federal regulations announced Monday aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030.

The draft proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency has sparked opposition from industry groups who say the changes would be prohibitively expensive. But the proposal's backers say the rules are needed to cut carbon pollution that scientists say contributes to climate change.

Update at 10:45 a.m. ET: Proposed Rule Published

Spain's King Juan Carlos signs a document in the Zarzuela Palace, planning his abdication, in this photo released by the Royal Palace. Juan Carlos will be replaced by his son, Crown Prince Felipe.

Spain's King Juan Carlos Will Abdicate In Favor Of Son

This post was updated at 10:45 a.m. ET

The news comes as something of a surprise: King Juan Carlos of Spain is abdicating and will be succeeded by his 46-year-old son, Crown Prince Felipe.

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy made the announcement at a hastily called news conference Monday, saying that Juan Carlos is "convinced that this is the best moment for a change in the leadership of state with complete normalcy," according to El Pais.

Artist and former soldier Chen Guang stands with one of his paintings last year that depicts the scene when he helped clear Tiananmen Square as a soldier.

For One Soldier At Tiananmen, A Day 'Never Forgotten'

Hour after hour passed as Chen Guang stood, gun trembling in his hands, behind the doors of Beijing's Great Hall of the people, waiting for the order to clear Tiananmen Square of its student protesters.

It was 1989, and Chen was a 17-year-old soldier from a small town whose life was changed by his role in the bloody crackdown. His account offers a sharply different perspective of the events of June 3 and 4, 1989, when martial law troops fought their way into the center of Beijing, killing hundreds of people, mainly on approach roads into the square.

A collage of family photos of Melissa Sherak Glasser.

Pregnancy Hormone May Reduce Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

For decades, women with multiple sclerosis have noticed that they tend to do better while they are pregnant. That has led to an experimental drug for the disease that's based on a hormone associated with pregnancy.

Ralph Thomas plays the harp at his house in Arlington, Vt. His reflux symptoms weren't controlled by medication, so he decided to have surgery to install a LINX device.

Tiny Magnetic Beads Help Tame Severe Reflux For Some People

Call it what you will — acid reflux, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or just plain heartburn. About 1 in 5 Americans suffer symptoms each week. They spend $10 billion a year on medication to relieve those symptoms, including indigestion, chest pain and difficulty breathing. Some even get major surgery to cure this digestive disorder.

Yuri Kochiyama looks at a memorial for World War II Japanese-American internees at the Rohwer Relocation Center in Rohwer, Ark., in 2004.

Japanese-American Activist And Malcolm X Ally Dies At 93

Japanese-American activist Yuri Kochiyama has died of natural causes in Berkeley, Calif., at the age of 93. The lifelong champion of civil rights causes in the black, Latino, Native American and Asian-American communities passed away peacefully in her sleep on Sunday morning, according to her family.

Chicago police detectives investigate the scene where a number of people, including a 3-year-old child, were shot in a city park in Chicago in 2013.

When A Bullet Misses Its Target, It Can Still Kill

In May, multiple people were struck or even killed by stray bullets in cities across the country, including Sacramento, Calif., and Des Moines, Iowa. In Washington, D.C., a 6-year-old is recovering from getting shot on a playground.

Thursday, Betty Howard, a 58-year-old special education teacher, was talking with friends inside a real-estate office in Chicago's South Side when she was killed by a stray bullet.

Report: NSA Collects Millions Of Photos For Facial Recognition Project

Because of the big news about the release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, we missed another big story on Saturday that was published by The New York Times: Based on documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, the paper reports the U.S.

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