National News

Uruguay's Luis Suarez holds his teeth after biting Italy's Giorgio Chiellini's shoulder during Tuesday's World Cup match between Italy and Uruguay in Brazil. FIFA has banned Suarez for 9 games and 4 months over the incident.

FIFA Bites Back: Uruguay's Luis Suarez Suspended 9 Games

Two days after the sporting world reacted in shock to what appeared to be a case of one elite soccer player biting another, FIFA, the sport's governing body, announced that it's suspending Uruguayan star Luis Suarez for nine matches and fining him 100,000 Swiss francs (about $112,000).

The suspension comes two days before Uruguay faces Colombia in the round of 16 on Saturday. It begins immediately, FIFA says. Suarez is also banned from any soccer activity for four months.

Comedian Will Ferrell was unveiled as the surprise "secret weapon" of U.S. Soccer, on the eve of a pivotal World Cup match against Germany. Ferrell promised to "bite every German player, if I have to."

Will Ferrell, Teddy Goalsevelt Pump Up U.S. Fans

"I'm not going to lie to you – I'm not in the best shape," Will Ferrell told American soccer fans in Brazil last night, after being announced as a mock World Cup replacement by U.S. Soccer.

The comedian paid a surprise visit to a rally for fans on the eve of the U.S. soccer team's showdown with Germany, sending the crowd into a frenzy after being unveiled as its "secret weapon."

"I'm so honored to be playing tomorrow," Ferrell said. He later added, "I'm not in soccer shape right now, but I'm going to try my best to live up to the spirit of this American team."

Iraqis who have fled as the Sunni extremist group ISIS has spread in northern Iraq enter a camp for displaced people between the Iraqi city of Mosul and the Kurdish city of Irbil Thursday. Iraq's leader says he welcomes Syria's attacks on ISIS.

'We Welcome' Syrian Airstrikes On ISIS, Iraqi Leader Maliki Says

With both Iraq and Syria facing threats from the extremist group ISIS, a recent attack by Syrian warplanes along the countries' border was a welcome development, says Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. He says that he didn't ask for the airstrikes — but he doesn't have a problem with them, either.

A man who lives in Ukraine's Donetsk region shows part of a shell that exploded in the yard of his house Wednesday, after a reported mortar attack by Ukrainian government forces Tuesday. The area is under a tense ceasefire that will expire Friday.

Reports Of New Fighting Rattle Ukraine's Truce As Kerry Urges Russia To Help

An exchange of mortar fire has been reported in eastern Ukraine, where government troops and pro-Russian separatist forces had been observing an uneasy ceasefire in the past week. The news comes as Secretary of State John Kerry says Russia could face sanctions if it doesn't help end the violence.

Russian state news media are reporting explosions near the airport in the eastern Ukrainian city of Kramatorsk, where the armed groups reportedly absorbed and returned mortar fire. Similar clashes were reported earlier this week.

Ibiza

Oil Off The Coast Of Ibiza? Protesters Don't Want To Know

Ibiza — famous for wild, all-night parties — is home to some of the Mediterranean's most pristine beaches and thriving marine ecosystems. But these could soon be endangered by more than the island's hedonism.

Spain's central government is considering whether to allow oil prospecting near the coasts of Ibiza and its neighboring island, Formentera. The proposed survey area is about 1,500 square miles and starts around 30 miles off the coastline.

British Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech next to German Chancellor Angela Merkel at a technology Trade fair March 10 in Hanover, Germany.

In Flanders Fields, Europeans Still Learning How To Get Along

On Thursday, European leaders are gathering in Belgium to mark the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I — the bloodbath that ended millions of European lives.

And killed 116,516 U.S. troops. And laid the groundwork for World War II.

The centenary ceremony in Ypres, Belgium, provides a good reminder that whenever relations among European nations break bad, the rest of us need to pay attention.

It's time to listen up again.

A couple walks along the beach in the resort area of Varadero, Cuba. Varadero is home to upscale hotels and resorts that cater to foreign tourists.

Tourism Money Flows Into Cuba, Bringing Economic Hopes And Fears

Every morning, Manuel Landin Rodriguez walks past the luxurious state-owned Xanadu Mansion hotel and crosses its neatly trimmed golf course all the way to its edge. He camps out on the cliff overlooking the turquoise Caribbean waters that make the resort town of Varadero on Cuba's northern coast so famous.

Landin, a retired physical education teacher, comes to the spot to fish. When we meet him on the cliffs, he's trying to catch mojarras -- small silver fish that hang out in the shallow waters to avoid sharks — which he will use to feed his family of five.

Flooding across the Upper Midwest, including Iowa, over the last couple weeks has soaked homes and fields and left local governments scrambling.

Rain Storms Pummel Upper Midwest, Drowning Resources

Heavy rains over the past couple of weeks have rivers rising all across the Upper Midwest, flooding homes, swamping fields and washing out roads.

Fans hum 24/7 as Laura Westra tries to dry out her sopping-wet basement in the small town of Rock Valley, Iowa.

The nearby Rock River, in the northwest corner of the state, swelled last week wider and deeper than anyone can remember.

"We've lived here 45 years, and this is the first time we had water in the basement," Westra says.

Fighting between Iraqi government forces and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria leaves buildings destroyed in Ramadi, Anbar province, on Tuesday.

Behind ISIS Battle In Iraq, A Clash Between Two Arch-Terrorists

While eyes have been focused on Sunni extremists and their lightning campaign across Iraq, there is a much more fundamental war waging behind the scenes.

It is a clash between two arch-terrorists: the head of al-Qaida's central operation, Ayman al-Zawahri, and the man leading the Sunni extremist charge in Iraq, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

The outcome of the battle between the two men could fundamentally change the face of terrorism.

The dust-up between al-Zawahri and al-Baghdadi broke out in the open earlier this year, and it centered on territory.

An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan, in 2010. A new report questions the U.S. policy of using armed drones abroad to carry out attacks on suspected terrorists.

Report Questions U.S. Policy On Overseas Drone Strikes

U.S. strategy that relies on armed drones to kill terrorism suspects overseas "rests on questionable assumptions and risks increasing instability and escalating costs," according to a year-long study by a group of prominent military, intelligence and foreign policy experts.

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