National News

Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel poses for photos, in Los Angeles, last year. The company has come under fire for violating promises to delete customer data.

Snapchat Settles With FTC Over Privacy Breach

Mobile messaging service Snapchat has agreed to a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission over allegations that it deceived customers by collecting their user information without permission.

Snapchat's mobile app promises users that video and photos will "disappear forever" soon after they're sent, thus insuring privacy and safeguarding against data collection.

Trappist monks observe Vigils at 3:15 a.m. in Trappist, Ky., on July 3, 1998. An accountant at the abbey was indicted on Wednesday on 87 counts of theft.

Accusations Of Embezzlement, Sex Roil Old Kentucky Monastery

There's an interesting story out of Kentucky where the former accountant for the nation's oldest operating monastery was indicted Wednesday for allegedly stealing more than $1 million from the Abbey of Gethsemani.

But John Hutchins, the man at the center of the allegations, says he was targeted because he revealed details of what he says were sexual affairs inside the 166-year-old monastery.

Calif. City Wants To Make It A Crime To Bully Those Younger Than 26

A California town is moving closer to making it a misdemeanor crime to bully anyone from kindergarten age up to 25 years old. The Carson City Council voted unanimously in favor of the measure this week, and it will come up for final approval May 20.

"We are going to protect not only the kid that is bothered in school, but when you leave school and go home, we're going to protect you as a city," bill co-sponsor Councilman Mike Gipson says, according to local KABC 7 TV.

Rwandan President Paul Kagame takes part in a conference on the role of women at the nation's Parliament in the capital, Kigali, in 2010. Women in Rwanda account for 64 percent of the lower house of Parliament — a higher percentage than in any other country.

The Nation That Elects The Most Women Is ...

As Rwanda began to rebuild itself from the ashes of the 1994 genocide, something unexpected happened: Women began playing a much more influential role on many fronts, including politics.

Traditions that had limited women previously were cast aside, and President Paul Kagame also actively pushed for women to be in more prominent positions.

Migrant workers harvest corn on Uesugi Farms in Gilroy, Calif., in 2013.

Injuries On The Farm Happen Much More Often Than We're Told

Farm work has always been one of the most dangerous jobs in America. Government statistics show it clearly, and the people doing the work can attest, too.

But new research from the University of California-Davis suggests that it's a much bigger problem than the federal government recognizes. The health problems faced by agricultural workers are the most undercounted of any industry in the U.S., they say.

A protest during the Arab Spring

The Arab Activists Who Refuse To Bow To The Giant

A new film, We Are The Giant, follows six people's stories during the Arab Spring revolutions. Tell Me More's Celeste Headlee finds out more about their motivation from activist Maryam Al Khawaja and co-producer Razan Ghalayini.

Sammy Davis, Jr. holds daughter Tracey in a family picture taken in 1962.

Rat Pack's Sammy Davis Jr. Lives On Through Daughter's Stories

In his own words, Sammy Davis, Jr. was "the only black, Puerto Rican, one-eyed, Jewish entertainer in the world."

His daughter, Tracey Davis, shares memories and details of his life in her new book, Sammy Davis Jr.: A Personal Journey with My Father. It's based on conversations Davis had with her father as he battled throat cancer near the end of his life.

Lots of swimming in icy seas may have helped bears evolve to eat a high-fat diet yet remain healthy.

If Polar Bears Can Eat A Ton Of Fat And Be Healthy, Why Can't We?

If you were a bear and wanted to make a go of it in the frozen north (think polar bear, of course), what would you need to survive?

White fur would help, to help you sneak up on predators. Also plenty of body fat to stay warm. And you'd need great stamina in order to swim many miles from one ice floe to the next.

And there's another important trait, researchers reported Thursday: Polar bears have genes that help them live on a diet that's overloaded with fat – without suffering the sorts of human diseases that typically come with a diet of that sort.

Tsarnaev's Attorneys Say FBI Questions Violated His Rights

Results of the FBI's questioning of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a hospital last April should not be allowed as evidence, Tsarnaev's attorneys say. They're asking a federal judge to suppress statements he made as he suffered from gunshot wounds.

The agents said they needed to be sure the threat to public safety was over, according to the filing, which says they went too far in an attempt to "extract as much incriminating information as possible, without regard for the protections of the Fifth Amendment."

Peter Lee (left), executive director of Covered California, greets employees at a call center in Fresno, Calif., in February.

HealthCare.Gov Looks Like A Bargain Compared With State Exchanges

Sometimes there really are economies of scale. And the nation's health insurance exchanges may be a case in point.

As rocky as the rollout of HealthCare.gov was, the federal exchange was relatively efficient in signing up enrollees. Each one cost an average of $647 in federal tax dollars, an analysis finds. It cost an average of $1,503 – well over twice as much – to sign up each person in the 15 exchanges run by individual states and Washington, D.C.

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