National News

Paris Attack Suspects Would Have Been Hard To Track

Robert Siegel talks to Paris-based terrorism and security expert Jean-Charles Brisard about the terrorist cell in France known as the Buttes-Chaumont network in which Cherif Kouachi, one of the suspects in Wednesday's attack in Paris, was involved.

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Massachusetts Will Limit Practice Of Restraint And Seclusion In Schools

Massachusetts is one of a growing number of states that are putting new restrictions on the practice of restraining and secluding public school students.

The techniques — which have been blamed for harming students and in at least 20 deaths — were used more than 267,000 times in a recent school year, according to an analysis last year of federal data by NPR and ProPublica.

New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton speaks during an NYPD swearing-in ceremony in New York on Jan. 7. He confirmed to NPR today that there had been a work slowdown by officers  in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead. He said the matter was being corrected.

New York Police Commissioner Confirms Work Slowdown By Officers

New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton confirmed there had been a work slowdown by officers in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead, but added that the matter was being corrected.

Congressional Budget Watchdogs Change The Way They Keep Score

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Future Of Keystone XL Pipeline Back In Obama's Hands

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France Hostage Crises End After Chaotic Day

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First Amendment Arguments Overshadow Sterling Espionage Case

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Los Angeles May Have Been A Safer Bet Than Boston For Olympics Bid

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Week In Politics: New Congress, Keystone XL Pipeline, Paris Attack

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As Rumors Spread, More Cubans Try To Reach The U.S. By Sea

Since President Obama's announcement that he wants to normalize relations with Cuba, the U.S. Coast Guard says there has been a spike in the number of Cubans leaving their homeland on rafts and boats.

They're coming, officials say, because of a rumor in Cuba that the U.S. will soon change the policy that allows Cubans who reach the U.S. to remain in the country legally.

The commander of the Seventh Coast Guard District in Miami, Rear Adm. Jake Korn, says 481 Cubans attempted to reach the U.S. on rafts and boats last month — double the amount seen in December 2013.

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