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The Creepiest Ghost And Monster Stories From Around The World

It's Halloween — a time for Frankenstein monsters and vampires and werewolves. But many of us have our own monsters from different cultures, and When we threw out a call to our readers asking what ghost stories and folktales they grew up with in their own traditions, we got back stories of creatures stalking the shadows of Latin American hallways and vengeful demons from South Asia with backwards feet. (And that's before we get to the were-hyenas and the infernal bathroom stalls.) Below are some of the best we've found or that were told to us from Code Switch readers.

Israel Reopens Disputed Religious Site In Jerusalem To Worshippers

Israel reopened Jerusalem's Temple Mount today, a day after it closed the disputed religious site for the first time since 2000 following the attempted assassination of a right-wing Jewish activist.

More than 1,000 security personnel were deployed following clashes Thursday between Palestinians and riot police.

NPR's Emily Harris reported on the reopening for our Newscast unit. She said:

Protesters shout out as they go on a rampage near on Thursday outside the parliament building in Burkina Faso's capital, Ouagadougou.

Burkina Faso's Military Takes Power After President Resigns

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Burkina Faso's military appears to have taken control of the African nation shortly after long-time President Blaise Campaore, who has ruled since staging a coup in 1987, agreed to resign as part of what he said was a plan to hold elections in 90 days.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports that the country's armed forces chief, Gen. Honore Traore, announced on Friday that he was taking charge, but it wasn't clear if his role would be as interim leader or something more permanent.

Lava near the leading edge of the flow oozes over a concrete slab and toward a tangerine tree before solidifying near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii earlier this week.

Lava Flow In Hawaii Spares Homes, But Threatens To Cut Off Community

Officials in Hawaii are sending National Guard troops to the town of Pahoa on the Big Island, where a lava flow is creeping toward a main road, threatening to cut off the community.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said 83 troops have been sent to the town of fewer than 1,000 to help provide security. They are to aid in a road block and with other safety issues, The Associated Press says.

"These are local troops, people from the community. They'll be here working to take care of their family and friends," Oliveira said.

50 Great Teachers: A Celebration Of Great Teaching

Anne Sullivan was a great teacher. Famously, she was the "Miracle Worker," who taught a blind and deaf girl named Helen Keller to understand sign language and, eventually, to read and write.

Socrates ... now there was a great teacher. More than two thousand years after he gave his last pop quiz, we still know him for the teaching style named after him, the Socratic method. And through the writings of his most famous pupil, Plato.

Eric Frein is escorted by police into the Pike County Courthouse for his arraignment in Milford, Pa., on Friday. Frein was captured by police on Thursday after a seven-week manhunt.

Alleged Cop-Killer Arraigned After Arrest Ends Extensive Manhunt

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

Eric Frein, the man who allegedly shot and killed a police officer and wounded another before leading authorities on a massive 48-day manhunt through rural Pennsylvania, appeared in court today appearing thin and bruised from his weeks on the run.

Madison Bumgarner and catcher Buster Posey of the San Francisco Giants celebrate after winning Game 7 of baseball's World Series against the Kansas City Royals.

Three Cheers For The Instant Replay

The Giants challenged a call in Game 7 of the World Series Wednesday night. It took the umpiring crew — in conference with the umpires holed up in the video monitoring station in New York City's Chelsea district — almost three minutes to overturn the on-field decision. They called the runner out at first, giving the Giants a potentially game-changing double-play.

Dr. Curtis Chan, a dentist in Del Mar, Calif., loads up a truck with 5,456 pounds of candy to deliver to Operation Gratitude during the Halloween Candy Buyback on Nov. 8 last year. Chan personally collected 3,542 pounds of candy from patients.

Cash For Halloween Candy? Dentists' Buyback Program Is Booming

If your little ghosts and goblins dump their candy on the living room floor tonight, go ahead: Let them at it. They can sort, then trade, and gorge on their favorites.

But if you're like many parents, by tomorrow morning you may want to get rid of some of this candy glut.

One possible solution? Check out the Halloween Candy Buyback program, which was founded by dentist Chris Kammer in Wisconsin. Kammer's office offers $1 a pound to buy back candy collected by the young trick-or-treaters in his practice.

A farmer protesting falling prices dumps cauliflower in front of the prefecture building of Saint-Brieuc in northwestern France as police look on Sept. 24.

Why Deflation Is Such A Big Worry For Europe

Growth is slowing all over the world right now, and that's especially true in Europe. Much of the continent is on the brink of another recession, and even the German economy is sputtering to a halt.

Some of the weakest countries, such as Spain and Italy, are actually experiencing deflation — a broad drop in incomes and asset values. It's a painful process that can be hard to reverse once it starts.

Europe's long, slow economic downturn has taken its toll on Javier Oroz Rodriguez, who owns a butcher shop in downtown Madrid.

Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph.

Virus Sleuths Chip Away At Ebola Mysteries

Vincent Racaniello, who studies viruses at Columbia University, says Ebola has recently become his obsession.

"I find myself reading incessantly about Ebola when I should be doing other things," says Racaniello, host of the online show This Week in Virology, which has devoted several recent programs to Ebola.

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