National News

Members of the Saudi security services inspect the site of a car bomb attack targeting Shiite Saudis attending Friday prayers at a mosque in Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

Islamic State Claims Responsibility For Second Saudi Attack

The Saudi branch of the self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility for a second suicide bomb attack in as many weeks on a Shiite mosque in the kingdom.

At least four people — including the person thought to be the driver of the car bomb — were killed in the attack, which took place during Friday prayers at the al-Anoud mosque in Dammam in Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province.

Screengrab of DuJour Media's Instagram feed.

Look Who's Hanging Out With A Goat! It's Supermodel Chrissy Teigen

Goats have lots of unusual friends.

There's the goat and the hippo.

And the goat and the giraffe.

Competitive swimmers often practice breath holding to increase endurance.

Breath-Holding In The Pool Can Spark Sudden Blackouts And Death

There's a dare that floats out on hot days by the pool: Who can hold their breath the longest? In shallow water, the challenge sounds fun or at least harmless. Competitive swimmers and divers crouch under the surface all the time to build endurance. But the practice can cause swimmers to faint and drown without warning and before anyone notices.

Former General and Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, arrives for his Inauguration at the eagle square in Abuja, Nigeria, on Friday.

Muhammadu Buhari Becomes Nigeria's President

For the first time since Nigeria won its independence in 1960, the country has inaugurated an opposition figure as its next president.

Muhammadu Buhari, a retired general who ruled the country back in the '80s after a military coup, was sworn in as president of Nigeria on Friday.

The BBC reports:

FIFA President Sepp Blatter attends a press conference in Jerusalem on May 19.

Despite Corruption Scandal, Blatter Wins Fifth Term As FIFA Chief

Update at 1:18 p.m. ET. Blatter Wins Fifth Term:

Two days after a group of leading officials were arrested and charged with corruption and bribery, soccer's world governing body decided to stay the course, electing Joseph "Sepp" Blatter as its president.

The man who died of Lassa fever flew from West Africa to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport.

New Jersey Lassa Fever Death Reveals Holes In Ebola Monitoring System

A man died of a hemorrhagic fever in New Jersey this week. This by itself is fairly unusual in the Garden State. Making the case even more odd was that the man was being monitored for Ebola by New Jersey health officials, and the case should have been caught earlier.

The events expose a hole in a public health system meant to track potential Ebola cases.

The 55-year-old New Jersey resident worked in the mining industry and traveled frequently to West Africa. Two weeks ago he landed at JFK International Airport after a flight from Liberia.

In 2014, BookCon responded to the We Need Diverse Books campaign by inviting it to form its own panel. Pictured here, left to right: I.W. Gregorio, Mike Jung, Matt de la Pena, Grace Lin and Jacqueline Woodson.

A Year Later, #WeNeedDiverseBooks Has Left Its Mark On BookCon

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

Troops at sea do a towing exercise, where one vehicle is "in distress" and the other has to tow it using ropes.

On The California Shore, Sizing Up Female Marines' Combat Readiness

On the shores of California one recent morning, female Marines were heaving heavy chains to secure amphibious assault vehicles that soon would roll into the waves.

The exercise was one part of a yearlong experiment aimed at settling the question of whether women can handle the punishing world of ground combat.

Vanya Shivashankar, left, of Olathe, Kan., and Gokul Venkatachalam of Chesterfield, Mo., lift the trophy after becoming co-champions Thursday night after the final round of the 88th annual Scripps National Spelling Bee at National Harbor in Oxon Hills, Md.

It All Came Down To 'Nunatak'

I started off wondering whether I might be able to spell a few of the words right. I ended up realizing that most of them I had never even heard of before.

Iridocyclitis. Cibarial. Pyrrhuloxia. And so on.

It was one of the many surprises of an evening spent watching the finals of the Scripps National Spelling Bee last night in Washington.

Another big surprise was how much I thoroughly enjoyed it.

I had expected to see a bunch of highly trained kids who've spent months and years memorizing the dictionary, essentially regurgitating that information.

Vanya Shivashankar, left, of Olathe, Kan., and Gokul Venkatachalam of Chesterfield, Mo., lift the trophy after becoming co-champions Thursday night after the final round of the 88th annual Scripps National Spelling Bee at National Harbor in Oxon Hills, Md.

National Spelling Bee Crowns Co-Champs For Second Straight Year

Etymology? He don't need no stinkin' etymology.

Informed that the word list was running out, and a final correct spelling would result in a tie with Vanya Shivashankar, Gokul Venkatachalam was served his final word (nunatak) and volleyed it right back, n-u-n-a-t-a-k. Even the audience was denied a definition (it's an Inuit term for an exposed, rocky geographic element amid an ice field or glacier).

It created co-champions of the Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee for the second consecutive year.