National News

A Texas flag sticks out of the barrel of a rifle belonging to Robert Perez, as he and others with the group Open Carry Tarrant County gathered for a May 29 demonstration in Haltom City, Texas.

'Open Carry' Gun Laws Spark Texas Backlash

Last week, not long after a lone gunman's rampage in California, Texas witnessed an unnerving series of demonstrations.

Groups of young men, armed with tactical long rifles slung across their backs, began showing up at restaurants like Chili's and Chipotle, Sonic and Jack in the Box, to mention a few, as part of their response to another anguished gun control conversation.

Manhunt Underway In Canada After 3 Police Officers Killed

Police are searching for an armed suspect after a rare fatal attack on Canadian police. On Wednesday night, five Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers were shot in the city of Moncton, New Brunswick. Three died, and two are hospitalized in stable condition.

A worker wears a mask as he touches a camel at his employer's farm on May 12, outside Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia To Test Camels And Livestock For MERS

OK, so now we know for sure that camels can, in fact, transmit the virus that causes the Middle East respiratory syndrome to humans.

The Chicago tech community balked at this Techweek Chicago invite, which the event has now apologized for.

Chicago Conference Is The Latest In Tech Sexism Hall Of Shame

Times may be slowly a-changin' for the Y-chromosome-dominant technology sphere, where it's becoming a tougher environment to objectify women, at least publicly.

In A First For Britain, A Secret Trial For Terrorism Suspects

There are terrorism-related trials with secret testimony and secret evidence, but an upcoming trial in Britain goes beyond all that. It's so secret that little is known about the case — except that it involves terrorism.

NPR's Ari Shapiro is reporting on the trial, which starts June 16, for our Newscast unit. Here's his report:

Migrants arrive at a rest stop in Ixtepec, Mexico, after a 15-hour ride atop a freight train headed north toward the U.S. border on Aug. 4, 2013. Thousands of migrants ride atop the trains, known as La Bestia, or The Beast, during their long and perilous journey through Mexico to the U.S.

Riding 'The Beast' Across Mexico To The U.S. Border

There's a network of freight trains that runs the length of Mexico, from its southernmost border with Guatemala north to the United States. In addition to grain, corn or scrap metal, these trains are carrying an increasing number of undocumented immigrants whose aim is to cross into the U.S.

And despite the many deadly challenges it poses, more and more children — both with adults and alone — have been making the risky journey. That prompted President Obama this week to warn of "an urgent humanitarian situation."

In late April, rescue workers surrounded the area where the South Korean ferry Sewol sank. The body of a victim was recovered Thursday about 25 miles from this site.

Body Found Miles From Sunken South Korean Ferry

The body of a victim in the South Korean ferry disaster was retrieved Thursday, bringing the death toll to 289.

The remains were recovered 25 miles from the capsized vessel, according to The Associated Press. Fingerprints identified the body as that of a passenger who had been traveling with his family. His wife and 11-year-old son were previously found dead; his 7-year-old son was rescued, according to the wire service.

General Motors Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra (center), Executive Vice President Mark Reuss (right) and President Dan Ammann discuss a review of the company's handling of a recall for a deadly ignition switch problem.

GM Review Found 'History Of Failures' In Ignition Switch Debacle, CEO Says

An internal inquiry into the long-delayed ignition switch recall by General Motors found an 11-year "history of failures," CEO Mary Barra says. She announced the findings of an investigation into how the company handled a deadly defect with ignition switches at a Thursday morning news conference. (updated at 12:04 p.m.: added link to full report).

The Birds And The Bees... And iPads

The Talk. The Facts of Life. The Birds and the Bees. Whatever you call it, do you remember when and how you first learned about human sexuality? For me, it was a series of conversations in school and with my parents, that began in third grade, with the classic picture book, "Where Did I Come From?".

Don Zimmer, manager of the Chicago Cubs, watches batting practice before the 1990 All-Star game with fellow managers Jim Leyland of the Pittsburgh Pirates, Tony LaRussa of the Oakland Athletics and Roger Craig of the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field.

Baseball Man Don Zimmer Dies, Ending An Epic Sports Career

His big-league career began in the 1950s and included the most recent Yankees dynasty. Along the way, the word "beloved" was often attached to his name. Baseball – the players, the fans, seemingly the sport itself – is mourning Don Zimmer today, after he died at age 83 Wednesday.

The tributes to the feisty guy with a good sense of humor and a bottomless love for the game are pouring out from all over, proof that he didn't waste any time during his 66 years in baseball. In recent years, Zimmer had been suffering from kidney and heart problems.

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