National News

This undated image provided by the journal, Nature, shows an archaeological site, near Lake Turkana in Kenya.

New Discovery Of World's Oldest Stone Tools

Scientists working in East Africa say they've unearthed the oldest stone tools ever found. They were apparently made 500,000 years before the human lineage evolved.

A team led by Sonia Harmand from Stony Brook University in New York found the tools in Kenya, near Lake Turkana. It's an area that's yielded numerous fossils and tools from early humans.

FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Former FBI Agent Speaks Out: 'I Was Not Protected'

Robyn Gritz spent 16 years at the FBI, where she investigated a series of major national security threats. But she says she got crosswise with her supervisors, who pushed her out and yanked her security clearance.

For the first time, she's speaking out about her situation, warning about how the bureau treats women and the effects of a decade of fighting terrorism.

Sequencing the genes of a cancer cell turns up lots of genetic mutations — but some of them are harmless. The goal is to figure out which mutations are the troublemakers.

Personalizing Cancer Treatment With Genetic Tests Can Be Tricky

It's becoming routine for cancer doctors to order a detailed genetic test of a patient's tumor to help guide treatment, but often those results are ambiguous. Researchers writing in Science Translational Medicine Wednesday say there's a way to make these expensive tests more useful.

Here's the issue: These genomic tests scan hundreds or even thousands of genes looking for mutations that cause or promote cancer growth. In the process, they uncover many mutations that scientists simply don't know how to interpret — some may be harmless.

The team with SAR Dogs Nepal performs many search operations in the Himalayas. Last year they rescued five foreign trekkers and about 200 Nepalis.

Dog Team Races To Rescue Lost Hiker In The Himalayas

The night before he disappeared, Dennis Lee Thian Poh called his wife in Kuala Lumpur. They chatted about the bitter cold in Nepal's Annapurna range and he said that dinner in his small lodge had consisted, yet again, of vegetable fried rice.

Lee, 47, had been hiking for six days in Nepal's most visited trekking zone, the Annapurna Conservation Area.

An engraving of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington on April 14, 1865. Lincoln died the next day.

Documents Show Global Outpouring Of Grief Over Lincoln's Assassination

"The exhibition of profound grief was such as I have never seen equalled. Several overcome by their emotion, sat down upon the very ground and wept."

That was how Thomas Nelson, a U.S. minister to Chile, described the reaction of ordinary citizens in Spain to the news of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination in 1865.

A gyrocopter sits on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Wednesday. A Capitol Police spokeswoman said its occupant was arrested.

Postman Carrying Letters For Congress Lands On Capitol Grounds In A Gyrocopter

Updated at 8:10 p.m. EDT

The U.S. Capitol Police have confirmed that Douglas Mark Hughes of Ruskin, Fla. was the pilot who landed a gyrocopter not far from the capitol building.

Police searched the vehicle, saying "nothing hazardous" was found. The gyrocopter was relocated to a secure location, the department said in a statement.

Shortly after landing, Hughes was quickly named by friends and news outlets as the man who flew low over the reflecting pool to land near the Congressional buildings. He was met by police with their guns drawn.

U.S. Predicted To Be Net Energy Exporter In Next Decade; First Time Since 1950s

The U.S. will reach a new balance in energy trade "sometime between 2020 and 2030," says the Energy Information Administration, which predicts the U.S. could become a net energy exporter in the near future.

The federal agency's prediction cites a rise in domestic natural gas production and changes in energy demands. If it happens, the shift would end a streak of more than 50 years in which the U.S. has been a net importer of energy.

A gravestone identifying the resting place of seven unknowns from the USS Oklahoma is shown at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. The Pentagon says it will disinter and try to identify the remains of up to 388 unaccounted for sailors and Marines killed when the ship capsized in the 1941 Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Pentagon To Exhume Remains Of Sailors From USS Oklahoma

The Pentagon says it will exhume the remains of 388 sailors and Marines who died on Dec. 7, 1941, in the capsizing of the USS Oklahoma during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

President Obama meets Cuban President Raul Castro at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City on April 11. The White House says it wants to remove Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism.

Who's On The List Of State Sponsors Of Terrorism, And Why

The White House announced Tuesday that President Obama would remove Cuba from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. That got us thinking about which other nations are on the list, how they got there, whether any others have been removed, and what happens to countries when they're put on (or taken off) the list.

Who's On The List?

Aside from Cuba, there are three other countries currently on the list:

Some doctors aren't up to date on how to assess autism symptoms in very young children.

Some Doctors Still Dismiss Parents' Concerns About Autism

Most children with autism get diagnosed around age 5, when they start school. But signs of the developmental disorder may be seen as early as 1 year old.

Yet even if a parent notices problems making eye contact or other early signs of autism, some doctors still dismiss those concerns, a study finds, saying the child will "grow out of it." That can delay diagnosis and a child's access to therapy.