National News

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks to reporters after inspecting a maglev train system at the Yamanashi Experiment Center in Tsuru Saturday. Japan is reportedly willing to send the technology to the U.S. without a fee.

Japan May Send Maglev Train Expertise To U.S., Without A Fee

The technology behind Japan's magnetically levitated train system, which whooshes passengers to their destinations at speeds topping 300 mph, could come to the U.S. without a traditional license fee, according to Japanese media outlets.

Japan is also willing to include billions in loans to help underwrite what would be a very expensive project, a government source tells The Japan Times.

Here's more from the newspaper:

Nicole Yorksmith (left) holds her son while standing with her partner, Pam Yorksmith. They were among four legally married couples who filed a federal civil rights lawsuit seeking to compel Ohio to recognize same-sex marriages on birth certificates.

Ohio Ordered To Recognize Out-Of-State Gay Marriages

The state of Ohio was told by a federal judge Monday that it must recognize same-sex marriages legally performed in other states, Ohio Public Radio and TV's Jo Ingles reports.

French Police Deploy DNA Dragnet To Solve Rape Of Teen

Police in France are taking DNA samples from more than 500 male high school students in western France in hopes of identifying the person who raped a 16-year-old girl.

The assault reportedly occurred at a private Roman Catholic school in La Rochelle on the Atlantic coast on Sept. 30. Investigators are trying to match DNA found on the victim's clothing, the BBC says.

Deficit Forecasts Shaved, But Likely Won't Shrink For Much Longer

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said Monday that it expects the federal deficit will be about $22 billion less this fiscal year than previously thought, and about $9 billion less than had been anticipated next year.

The Grumpy Point: When A Man Turns 70

The approximate moment when grumpiness kicks in for men, according to a recently released report, is around age 70.

Then you'd better get off his lawn.

Researchers found that as men grow older — from, say, 50 on — they have fewer obstacles and annoyances to worry about in life and, furthermore, they are more equipped to deal with adversity. But around age 70, life — or at least the perception of happiness — begins to go downhill.

This combination of 10 separate images shows the moon during a total lunar eclipse in 2011 from the Spanish Canary Island of Tenerife.

There's A 'Blood Moon' Eclipse Tonight, But Will You Be Able To See It?

It's looking like clouds will obscure Monday night's lunar eclipse for nearly all of the U.S. East Coast, but much of the West and Midwest should be able to see it.

The U.S. Navy's Bluefin-21 Artemis autonomous underwater vehicle as it was being hoisted on board the Australian Navy vessel Ocean Shield earlier this month. The Bluefin is being deployed to map the sea floor in the area of the southern Indian Ocean where the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is concentrated. It will look for any sign of the missing jet.

Search For Jet Goes Underwater; Oil Slick Also Being Analyzed

On Day 38, the latest developments in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 come from the surface of the Indian Ocean and more than 2 miles beneath on the sea floor.

-- Search Goes Below. "Underwater vehicle Bluefin-21 deployed to find plane's wreckage." (The Sydney Morning Herald)

People flee after a fire reactivated in Valparaiso, Chile, Sunday. More than 10,000 people were evacuated as an army of firefighters battled the killer blaze.

For Second Night, Valparaiso Fire Spreads Misery In Chile

At least 12 people are dead and more than 2,000 homes have been destroyed by a large fire that wreaked havoc over the weekend in Valparaiso, Chile. Some 10,000 people have been forced to evacuate parts of the port city.

Government spokesman Álvaro Elizalde says that those figures are likely to go up, as the fire continues to burn.

A bomb blast and explosions that followed killed more than 70 people and injured more than 120 on Monday near Nigeria's capital, Abuja. Early speculation is that the attack was the work of the Boko Haram extremist group.

Dozens Dead, Scores Injured After Bomb Blast In Nigeria

A rush-hour bomb blast Monday at a bus station near Nigeria's capital and other explosions that followed are thought to have killed more than 70 people and injured more than 120.

An Islamist group that believes Western education is sinful and takes other extremist stands is being blamed.

"Fingers are being pointed at Boko Haram, the terrorist network that has been threatening to attack Nigeria's capital," NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton tells our Newscast Desk.

Armed men in military fatigues stood guard Monday outside a regional administration building they seized in the eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk.

In Ukraine: Pro-Russia Occupiers Defy Deadline, War Fears Grow

"A deadline set by the Ukrainian government for pro-Russian gunmen to leave government buildings in eastern Ukraine and surrender weapons passed early Monday," The Associated Press writes, "with no immediate sign of any action to force the insurgents out."

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