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The British rock band Deep Purple, shown here in 1971, wrote the hit song "Smoke on the Water," after watching the casino in Montreux, Switzerland, go up in flames later that year. The casino caught fire during a Frank Zappa concert.

A Swiss Town, A Casino Fire And 'Smoke On The Water'

The lakeside Swiss town of Montreux was in the news this week as the host of nuclear talks between Iran and six world powers.

But for rockers of a certain age, Montreux will always be best known for its rich musical history — including the roaring casino fire that inspired the English rock band Deep Purple's classic "Smoke on the Water."

Carly Medosch has conditions that cause intense fatigue and chronic pain. She took part in a 2014 Stanford Medicine X conference that included discussion of "invisible" illnesses.

People With 'Invisible Disabilities' Fight For Understanding

Some disabilities are more obvious than others. Many are immediately apparent, especially if someone relies on a wheelchair or cane. But others — known as "invisible" disabilities — are not. People who live with them face particular challenges in the workplace and in their communities.

Mercedes Binns, who has been to Selma 17 times because of its civil rights history, walks on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, on Sunday in Selma, Ala.

Selma Gathering Re-Enacts March Across 'Bloody Sunday' Bridge

Updated at 6:30 p.m. EDT

A day after President Obama spoke in Selma, Ala., to mark the 50th anniversary of 'Bloody Sunday' — a police crackdown on the 1965 voting rights march — tens of thousands of people gathered to trace the footsteps of the original protesters who were met by state troopers firing tear-gas and swinging truncheons at the foot of the Edmund Pettus bridge.

A trespasser stands and walks along the roof at House of Commons early Sunday morning in London. The unidentified man was taken into custody after spending about eight hours wandering around the roof of the Palace of Westminster.

What Was This Man Doing On The Roof Of The British Parliament?

A 23-year-old man whom police have not identified was arrested early Sunday in London after spending the night wandering around on the roof of the British parliament building.

The man was on the top of the Palace of Westminster, where both houses of Britain's parliament meet, for about eight hours, reports said. He was carrying no signs or banners and appeared to have no political agenda.

The U.K.'s Sunday Express reports:

FDA tests have turned up residues suggesting a few dairy farmers are illegally using antibiotics.

FDA Tests Turn Up Dairy Farmers Breaking The Law On Antibiotics

When it comes to the current controversy over antibiotic use on farm animals, milk is in a special category.

Lactating cows, unlike hogs, cattle or chickens that are raised for their meat, don't receive antibiotics unless they are actually sick. That's because drug residues immediately appear in the cow's milk — a violation of food safety rules.

Milk shipments are tested for six of the most widely used antibiotics, and any truckload that tests positive is rejected. So when cows are treated, farmers discard their milk for several days until the residues disappear.

People shout slogans during a rally in Rabin's square in Tel Aviv, Israel, late Saturday.

Thousands In Israel Gather In Anti-Netanyahu Rally

Tens of thousands of Israelis gathered in Tel Aviv to call for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's ouster in upcoming parliamentary elections.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, the gathering did not endorse a specific alternative: "Many of the Israelis filling Rabin Square in central Tel Aviv Saturday night said they didn't know who they were going to vote for. But most ... were against Netanyahu."

The Associated Press calls the rally "the highest profile demonstration yet in the run-up to the election."

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, and daughter Chelsea Clinton wave at the Clinton Global Initiative at the University of Miami on March 7.

Clintons Face Scrutiny Ahead Of Hillary's Campaign Announcement

Addressing a crowd at the Clinton Global Initiative University at Miami University in Coral Gables, Fla. on Saturday, former president Bill Clinton discussed the Clinton Foundation's decision to accept donations from foreign governments. The foundation's choice is questioned by critics as a possible conflict of interest, especially since some of the funds came in during Hillary Clinton's tenure as secretary of state, a post she left in 2013.

Between two portraits of Venezuela's hero Simon Bolivar in the background, President Nicolas Maduro speaks at a press conference in Caracas. Maduro blames the U.S. for plotting against him.

Venezuela's Maduro Sees Only Plots As His Economy Crumbles

As the U.S. prepares to reopen its embassy in communist Cuba, relations with another Latin American nation — oil-rich Venezuela — are crumbling.

President Nicolas Maduro accuses the U.S. of plotting a coup against him, and is expelling most U.S. diplomats from Venezuela. He is also demanding that Americans secure visas to enter the country.

The visa requirement is still so new that upon my arrival in Caracas this week without one, the immigration official doesn't even notice. She stamps my U.S. passport and says, "Welcome."

About 30 people believed to be relatives of Chinese passengers of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 that went missing a year ago, protest near the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing on Sunday.

MH370 Had Expired Battery On Black Box 'Pinger,' Report Says

An interim report released on the one-year anniversary of the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH 370 shows that the battery for the locator beacon on the Boeing 777's so-called black box was more than a year out of date at the time the plane loast contact with ground controllers over the Gulf of Thailand.

"According to maintenance records, the SSFDR ULB battery expired in December 2012," the 584-page report said (see below). "There is no evidence to suggest that the SSFDR ULB battery had been replaced before the expiry date."

Marilee Jones, former MIT dean of admissions and now a college admissions consultant.

Learning The Hard Truth About Lying

We all lie sometimes. But if you're in the public eye, the lie can take on a life of its own.

NBC's Brian Williams became the victim of his own story last month, exaggerating the danger he faced while reporting in Iraq in 2003. It lead to an on-air mea culpa and a temporary suspension from the anchor desk.

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