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'Charlie Hebdo' Keeps The Presses Running, Will Print 3 Milllion Copies

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Obama's Policing Task Force Begins With Public Hearing

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Five Years After 'Citizens United,' SuperPACs Continue To Grow

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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro is welcomed by Saudi Crown Prince Salman in Riyadh on Sunday. The meeting was part of Maduro's diplomatic tour of OPEC members to discuss falling oil prices, which have hit Venezuela's economy hard.

OPEC Members Feeling The Pain Of Falling Oil Prices

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro is trying to persuade his fellow OPEC leaders to reduce oil production as the price of crude continues to slide and hurt the Venezuelan economy, which depends on oil for 95 percent of its export revenue.

Maduro was in Qatar this week, seeking billions to shore up his economy.

Jasjit Kaur Singh, an Indian chef, cooks <em>kaala channa,</em> a traditional spicy Sikh dish. A psychologist says that children who grow up in cultures with lots of spicy food are taught to like spice early on.

How Do We Grow To Like The Foods We Once Hated?

Why do some of us like to slather hot sauce or sprinkle chili powder onto our food, while others can't stand burning sensations in our mouth?

It probably has to do with how much we've been socially pressured or taught to eat chili, according to Paul Rozin, a cultural psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania who has studied attitudes toward food for decades.

Militants of the Islamic State stand with a captured Iraqi army Humvee outside Beiji oil refinery, about 150 north of Baghdad, Iraq, in June 2014. While there is increased radicalization in many parts of the Arab world, there are also groups and individuals working to deradicalize young Muslim men.

When Islamic Radicals Turn Moderate

After last week's Paris shootings that targeted an irreverent political magazine and Jews in a kosher grocery store, there's been a flood of stories about the dangers of Muslim radicalization and how it happens.

What about people who go the other way, from extremist to moderate? These people exist; the U-turn happens.

U.S. funding for medical research by source, 1994-2012. (Data were adjusted to 2012 dollars using the Biomedical Research and Development Price Index.)

U.S. Funding of Health Research Stalls As Other Nations Rev Up

Though the United States is still leading the world in research related to diseases, it is rapidly losing its edge, according to an analysis in the American Medical Association's flagship journal JAMA.

If you look at biomedical research around the globe, the United States funded 57 percent of that work a decade ago. The U.S. share has since dropped to 44 percent, according to the study published online Tuesday.

The morning after an incident shut down a major subway line in Washington, D.C., traffic snafus made lots of drivers late, including Justice Antonin Scalia, pictured in 2013.

Rough Morning Commute? Justice Scalia Was Right There With You

A Washington, D.C., suburbanite had trouble getting to work Tuesday, leaving a key task to the boss.

At the U.S. Supreme Court, two unanimous opinions, both written by Justice Antonin Scalia, were handed down, but Scalia was missing in action. Chief Justice John Roberts summarized the opinions from the bench because Scalia was ... stuck in traffic.

An example of what Facebook's Amber Alerts will look like.

Facebook To Post Amber Alerts To Help Find Missing Kids

Starting today, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children will begin sending out Amber Alerts on Facebook's news feed. The alerts will include a photograph of the missing child and the location where the possible abduction took place.

Facebook has 185 million users in the U.S., and the notices will be tailored to location — so users will receive alerts about missing children in their area.

On a 2007 visit to Savelugu Hospital in Ghana, President Jimmy Carter asks a group of children if they've had Guinea worm. A raised hand is a yes.

'Watch Out, Guinea Worm, Here Comes Jimmy Carter'

This past fall, President Jimmy Carter, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002, celebrated his 90th birthday. Looking ahead, he's also hoping to celebrate the global eradication of Guinea worm disease (also known as dracunculiasis).

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