National News

Hailey, Idaho: A sign announcing the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl outside Zaney's coffee shop, where Bergdahl worked as a teenager. A rally celebrating his return home has been canceled, after organizers received threats of protests and hate mail.

Bergdahl's Hometown Cancels Celebration Of His Return

The news of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release from five years of captivity had been welcomed as a reason to celebrate in Hailey, Idaho. But organizers of a rally held in Bergdahl's honor while he was a prisoner say they're canceling this year's event, citing backlash over the U.S. deal with the Taliban that freed him.

In recent years, the Bring Back Bowe Rally has been an annual June event in the small town of Hailey, where bikers and POW-MIA support groups gathered to call for his return. Last year's event reportedly drew a crowd of more than 3,000.

Eimear McBride won the 2014 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction for her debut novel, <em>A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing. </em>The novel was rejected by publishers for almost a decade.

Book News: Experimental Debut Novel Wins Prestigious Baileys Prize

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Corinthians Arena in Sao Paulo, Brazil, holds a test match Sunday ahead of the World Cup. One fan who attended said the country "didn't deliver" and isn't ready for the event.

As Brazil Barrels Toward World Cup, Brazilians Aren't Feeling It

The stadium where the opening game of the World Cup will be played is a gleaming monument to the world's favorite sport, soccer. The Corinthians Arena — named after one of Brazil's most famous teams, which will take it over — has been built from scratch and boasts a massive LCD screen and state-of-the-art facilities.

Last weekend, it was full of fans watching the last test match before the World Cup begins. It was supposed to be a sort of final run-through to make sure everything is ready and working.

Except it wasn't.

Participants hold up images of former NSA analyst Edward Snowden at an April conference on the future of Internet governance in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

A Year After Snowden, U.S. Tech Losing Trust Overseas

This week marks the one-year anniversary of the Snowden revelations. Whatever you may think about Edward Snowden the man — is he a traitor or a hero? — one fact is indisputable. His leaks shook the U.S. technology industry to its core. And the reverberations keep on coming.

Take Cisco. The Silicon Valley giant is now at risk of losing its once-stellar reputation with foreign customers — at the exact same moment it needs to grow abroad.

Security Worries For The Cloud

A selection of low-alcohol wines, including a Riesling from Germany, a Vinho Verde from Portugal and a Txakoli from the Basque region of Spain.

The Secret's In The Sugar: Lower-Alcohol Wines Are Taking Off

Big, bold wines have their fans. But with the arrival of summer, make room for a bumper crop of lighter, more subtle wines.

"Low-alcohol wines are super-hot right now," says wine writer Katherine Cole.

There's Txakoli, or Txakolina, wines from the Basque Region of Spain, Rieslings from Germany and New York State and Vinho Verde from Portugal, to name a few.

These wines typically hover in the 9 percent to 11 percent alcohol range. This compares to about 13 percent to 14 percent you'd find in a typical California Chardonnay.

Donald Sterling watches his Los Angeles Clippers play the Sacramento Kings in October. Sterling's attorney says he has agreed to sell the team.

Attorney Says Sterling Will Sell Clippers, Drop NBA Suit

Reuters is quoting an attorney for Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling as saying his client has agreed to sell the team, and to drop a $1 billion lawsuit against the NBA.

Attorney Maxwell Blecher said Wednesday that Sterling "has made an agreement with the NBA to resolve all their differences," according to SI.com.

Hillary Clinton works a rope line at Intertech Plastics in Denver on Monday.

Is Clinton Distancing Herself From Obama? Maybe Not

Is Hillary Clinton distancing herself from the Obama administration in preparation for a 2016 presidential run?

Abraham T. Moses, principal of the the Washington United Christian Academy, reads scriptures aloud during the 25th annual U.S. Capitol Bible Reading Marathon on April 28, 2014.

Most Americans See Bible As Word Of God, Gallup Says

Three out of four Americans believe the Bible is the word of God, according to a new Gallup poll; some say the literal word, others that a supreme being inspired the text. But an increasing number also view the book as simply a collection of fables, legends and history.

A Saudi Arabian man wears a mask to protect against the Middle East respiratory syndrome at his farm outside Riyadh, May 12.

The Camel Did It: Scientists Nail Down Source Of Middle East Virus

In the two years since Middle East respiratory syndrome was first diagnosed in people, scientists have struggled to figure out how we catch the deadly virus. Some blamed bats. Others pointed at camels.

Now scientists in Saudi Arabia offer the strongest evidence yet that the one-humped dromedaries can indeed spread the MERS virus — which has infected more than 800 people on four continents, including two men in the U.S.

Latest Sexual Assault In India Underscores U.N. Chief's Call For Action

As U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon took notice of the global assault against women and girls, another brutal attack in India has highlighted once more the prevalence of gender-based crime in the world's largest democracy.

Police say a mother of five has been shot dead by militants in a remote village in the northeast of the country after she resisted attempts to molest her.

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