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Art projects like these anatomy murals are woven into the curriculum at the Homer Plessy Community Charter school in New Orleans.

A New Orleans Charter School Marches To Its Own Tune

This year, NPR Ed is reporting on the dramatic changes in the New Orleans school system.

All startups face big hurdles. But when you're a startup school in one of America's poorest cities, without deep-pocket backers, the challenges are daunting.

Oscar Brown is a New Orleans native. He grew up in the Desire housing project, a little over a mile west of his current home in a neighborhood ravaged by the storm that struck nearly a decade ago.

For some rural vets who live far from a VA hospital, getting medical care has meant driving a day or two from home, and missing work.

A Benefit For Rural Vets: Getting Health Care Close To Home

Army veteran Randy Michaud had to make a 200-mile trip to the Veterans Affairs hospital in Aroostook County, Maine, near the Canadian border, every time he had a medical appointment.

Michaud, who was medically retired after a jeep accident in Germany 25 years ago, moved home to Maine in 1991. He was eligible for VA medical care, but the long drive was a problem.

He's one of millions of veterans living in rural America who must travel hundreds of miles round-trip for care.

Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues found an enzyme in bacteria that makes it much easier to edit DNA in animal cells.

In Hopes Of Fixing Faulty Genes, One Scientist Starts With The Basics

Whether they admit it or not, many (if not most) scientists secretly hope to get a call in October informing them they've won a Nobel Prize.

But I've talked to a lot of Nobel laureates, and they are unanimous on one point: None of them pursued a research topic with the intention of winning the prize.

And so continues Code Switch's battle with illustrating studies about the subtle biases that inflict our email outboxes.

What's In A Name? It Could Matter If You're Writing To Your Lawmaker

In recent years, social scientists have tried to find out whether important decisions are shaped by subtle biases. They've studied recruiters as they decide whom to hire. They've studied teachers, deciding which students to help at school. And they've studied doctors, figuring out what treatments to give patients. Now, researchers have trained their attention on a new group of influential people — state legislators.

Elliott Adekoya, 31, aka The Milkman, is a DJ at Monrovia's Sky FM radio, pictured here his DJ booth. He is also part of a group of 45 Liberian musicians called the Save Liberia Project. They want to get the word out that Ebola is real, but it is <em>not </em>a death sentence. He says that message, which was propagated early on by the Ministry of Health, actually contributed to the problem.

Liberian Singers Use The Power Of Music To Raise Ebola Awareness

In West Africa, one of the simplest ways to slow the Ebola outbreak is to educate people about how to keep from getting infected with the virus. Now, there are some signs that Ebola awareness is indeed driving down the number of cases in parts of Liberia — and Liberian musicians and DJs may deserve some of the credit.

'Protocol Breach' Cited In Second Case Of Ebola In Dallas

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Students at Broward College in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., attend a debt management workshop. Broward is one of 29 colleges that no longer accepts unsubsidized student loans. The effort is part of an experiment to cut down on student loan debt and defaults.

To Cut Student Debt, Florida College Cuts Off Some Student Borrowing

To get a student loan at Broward College, one of Florida's largest community colleges, you first have to sit through a two-hour financial lesson with Kent Dunston.

It's a little like Scared Straight, the 1978 documentary designed to keep kids from ending up in prison.

Dunston's lesson, though, is about scaring students into making good financial choices. Nationwide, student loans total more than $1.2 trillion. And schools now face punishment — even closure — by the federal government if the rate is too high.

The Greek god Hermes is seen in a newly found mosaic, leading a chariot and its rider into the afterlife.

Striking Mosaic Found In Greek Tomb Dates From 4th Century B.C.

Archaeologists have uncovered an intricate and beautiful floor mosaic in a large tomb in northern Greece. Dating from the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., the mosaic covers a space of nearly 15 feet by 10 feet. It features two horses, a man and the god Hermes; it was found in a tomb that was discovered in August.

Native American protesters have been demonstrating against Columbus Day in Seattle for several years. Protest organizers say that Columbus should not be credited with discovering the western hemisphere at a time when it was already inhabited.

Seattle Swaps Columbus Day For 'Indigenous Peoples' Day'

This year's Columbus Day holiday will have a slightly different, more Native flavor in the city of Seattle. Thanks to a unanimous vote this summer by the city council, the federal holiday will now be known by a different name: Indigenous Peoples' Day.

The slide on the right has been treated with a coating that repels blood.

Slippery When Coated: Helping Medical Devices Resist Blood Clots

A carnivorous plant has inspired an invention that may turn out to be a medical lifesaver.

Nepenthes, also known as tropical pitcher plants or monkey cups, produce a superslippery surface that causes unfortunate insects that climb into the plant to slide to their doom.

Scientists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering wondered if they could find a way to mimic that surface to solve a problem in medicine.

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