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Senate's Letter To Iran Complicates Nuclear Negotiations

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Iraq Archaeologist Asks U.S. To Help Protect Antiquities

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Owner Unloads Maine Inn For An Essay, Postage And $125

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Frat Banned At Oklahoma University Is Familiar With Controversy

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SAE Fraternity Banned From University Of Oklahoma

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Boston Bombing Jury Sees Tsarnaev's Writings

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Dr. Nancy Hardt's free "clinic on wheels," parked in December at an apartment complex in Gainesville, Fla., gets about 5,000 visits from patients each year.

A Sheriff And A Doctor Team Up To Map Childhood Trauma

The University of Florida's Dr. Nancy Hardt has an unusual double specialty: She's both a pathologist and an OB-GYN. For the first half of her career, she brought babies into the world. Then she switched — to doing autopsies on people after they die.

It makes perfect sense to her.

"Birth, and death. It's the life course," Hardt explains.

Michigan Sen. Arthur Vandenberg, with arm raised, greets the press at the 1948 Republican Convention. Vandenberg worked closely with President Harry Truman's Democratic administration on foreign policy issues even though he was seeking the Republican nomination to challenge the president. "Politics must stop at the water's edge," Vandenberg famously said.

Taking U.S. Politics Beyond 'The Water's Edge'

In the spring of 1948, Arthur Vandenberg was a powerful Republican senator from Michigan with ambitions of unseating a vulnerable Democratic president, Harry Truman, in November of that year.

Vandenberg had considerable influence as head of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee at a moment when the U.S. was reordering a beleaguered world still emerging from the ashes of World War II.

A mummy of a Chinchorro child, dating to between 5000 B.C. and 3000 B.C. The Chinchorros were hunter-gatherers who lived in the region between modern-day Peru and Chile.

Climate Change May Be Destroying World's Oldest-Known Mummies

There's a problem with the mummies at the University of Tarapacá's archaeological museum in northern Chile.

They're turning into a black oozy substance.

Harvard University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences says scientists have found that Chile's famous 7,000-year-old Chinchorro mummies are being eaten by bacteria — and that climate change could be the culprit.

Dura Europos, a Roman walled city in eastern Syria, dates back to 330 B.C. The main gate is shown here in a photo from 2010. It's one of the many important archaeological sites militants of the self-styled Islamic State have ransacked and damaged.

Via Satellite, Tracking The Plunder Of Middle East Cultural History

Southern Turkey, near the Syrian border, is the crossroads for an extensive smuggling operation of ancient artifacts. Those transactions are held in secret, often in town towns along the border.

But high overheard, eyes are watching: satellites scanning heritage sites, sending alarming imagery to Washington, D.C.

From her office in the nation's capital, analyst Susan Wolfinbarger monitors the ransacking of these sites in Syria and Iraq on a large screen computer.

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