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Rolls of toilet paper and packages of tissue paper printed with images of pro-Beijing Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying are shown Democratic Party Vice Chairman Lo Kin-hei in Hong Kong on Saturday.

China Seizes Toilet Tissue Featuring Likeness Of Hong Kong Leader

Chinese authorities have seized thousands of rolls of toilet paper featuring a likeness of Hong Kong's unpopular chief executive that were destined for restrooms in the former British colony.

The BBC reports:

"Hong Kong's Democratic Party, which had planned to sell the novelty items at a fair next week, called the seizure a violation of freedom of expression.

The [8,000 rolls of] tissues were confiscated from a factory in mainland China on Friday."

<em>Nafea Faa Ipoipo (When Will You Marry?</em>), a 1892 oil on canvas by French artist Paul Gauguin, was reportedly sold for a record $300 million.

Gauguin Painting Reportedly Fetches Record $300 Million

A work by French painter Paul Gauguin, who died penniless in 1903, has reportedly smashed the record books as the most expensive ever sold. The piece, Nafea Faa Ipoipo (When Will You Marry?), is believed to have fetched $300 million.

The oil-on-canvas was produced in 1892 during Gauguin's first visit to French Polynesia. It features a pair of Tahitian girls seated next to a tree.

Sled dogs prefer below-zero weather for running, says musher Cody Strathe. Some mushers now train at night, when it's colder.

Climate Change Puts Alaska's Sled Dog Races On Thin Ice

For more than 30 years, the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest International Sled Dog race, which begins Saturday, has followed the Yukon River between Whitehorse, Canada, and Fairbanks, Alaska.

A little open water along the Yukon Quest trail is nothing new, but in recent years, long unfrozen stretches of the Yukon River have shaken even the toughest mushers.

Last year, musher Hank DeBruin of Ontario had stopped along the Yukon River to rest his dog team in the middle of the night, when the ice started to break up.

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, the President's first schoolteacher.

Pregame Analysis: The Coming Federal Education Debate

The main federal education law may finally get its long-overdue makeover in Congress this year, and we're going to be hearing and reading a lot about it.

Formally, it's the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, or ESEA. The last time it got a major overhaul was in 2001, with President Bush's No Child Left Behind Act. But nothing much has been done with the law since 2007.

If Congress does finally get to it this year, What can we expect?

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, left, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, background right, arrive for a meeting in Munich, Germany on Saturday.

Merkel Hopes To Dissuade Obama From Arming Ukraine

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

The issue is this: Should the West arm Kiev against Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine?

German Chancellor Angela Merkel says no, and she is joined by French President Francois Hollande. They have the outline of a plan that Hollande says includes "rather strong" autonomy for Ukraine's east. And they are taking it to President Obama.

Jordan Rejects ISIS Claim That Strike Killed American Hostage

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Shoppers queue outside the supermarket 'Dia a Dia' in Caracas, Venezuela, on Tuesday. The government took over stores of supermarket chain after alleging that it was hoarding food. According to many economists, government controls are making the economic crisis worse.

Rich In Oil, Venezuela Is Now Poor In Most Everything Else

Simon Nobile, 72, runs the Capri pasta factory in the capital Caracus, which was founded by his Italian-born father in 1940. Capri's two plants crank out 11 million pounds of pasta per month.

They could produce nearly twice that much. However, Nobile says a government policy designed to help the poor forces him to sell half of his inventory for just five cents a pound.

"There is no incentive because price controls mean that you lose money. So the more you produce, the more money you lose," he says.

Javier Villa (right) with his wife and son in their home in Puerto Rico.

In Puerto Rico, Health Overhaul Gets An Incomplete

Javier Villa has worked at his family's used car dealership in San Juan, Puerto Rico, ever since he finished high school.

Villa, 35, always assumed the insurance plan he had through work would take care of him and his family. But a couple years ago, he ran into a problem.

He was taking a shower one morning when he noticed a lump on the side of his throat. "Very big, like maybe a tennis ball," he says.

Birders Predict Another Snowy Owl 'Irruption'

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American Hostage's Parents Say They Hope She Is Alive

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