National News

The road to Equality, Ala., an unincorporated community in Coosa County. Alabama became the 37th state to legalize same-sex marriages Monday.

Alabama Courts Issue First Marriage Licenses To Same-Sex Couples

Alabama has become the 37th state to recognize same-sex marriage, after the U.S. Supreme Court denied a request that would have extended the state's ban Monday. But the state's chief justice says probate courts don't have to follow federal rulings on the issue.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET: Supreme Court Rejects State's Request

Expressing regret at the Supreme Court's decision, Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says it will probably bring more confusion and will keep him "from enforcing Alabama's laws against same-sex marriage."

A man shovels snow from his car in Boston Sunday, when a snowstorm began that isn't expected to finish until early Tuesday.

Snow Hits The Northeast (Again), As Pacific Storms Bring Floods To The West

A fresh blanket of snow is being laid over the Northeast, bringing the third bout of heavy snow to the area. Two large storms are bracketing the upper corners of the continental U.S., with heavy rains bringing flooding to the Northwest.

With more than 5 feet of snow in the past 30 days, Boston set a new record Monday morning, the AP reports, citing the National Weather Service. In the city, the snow isn't expected to stop falling (this time) until late tonight.

In the Northeast:

Cardinal Sean Patrick O'Malley of Boston arrives for a meeting of a Vatican commission on sex abuse at the Vatican on Saturday. O'Malley heads the group.

Papal Group Considers Sanctions On Bishops Who Cover Up Abuse

A commission advising Pope Francis on how to tackle clerical sex abuse of minors has completed its first full meeting at the Vatican. The commission, which has been criticized for its slow start, says it's now drawing up recommended sanctions against bishops who have covered up cases of abuse.

Cardinal Sean O'Malley of Boston, head of the commission, told reporters it's drafting practical recommendations on making bishops accountable for cover-ups and failure to prevent abuse.

Oil pumpjacks are seen in McKenzie County in western North Dakota. Cuts in production and energy company payrolls will cost the U.S. economy up to $150 billion, economist David Kotok of Cumberland Advisors projects.

Oil Price Dip, Global Slowdown Create Crosscurrents For U.S.

Continued job growth has boosted prospects for the U.S. economy, but it continues to face some tricky crosswinds. The big drop in oil prices and a stronger dollar both help the economy and hurt it. Add to that the recent slowdown in global growth.

Lots of economists have suggested the big drop in oil prices is a gift to consumers that will propel the economy. David Kotok of Cumberland Advisors is one of them. He argues that cheaper oil will ultimately be a positive.

Marder says immunotherapy has side effects but is less tiring than chemotherapy.

Harnessing The Immune System To Fight Cancer

When Barbara Marder was diagnosed with lung cancer three years ago, she had part of her right lung removed, went through a round of chemotherapy and tried to move on with her life.

"I had hoped that everything was fine — that I would not create difficulty for my children, that I would get to see my grandchildren grow up," says Marder, 73, of Arnold, Md.

But a routine scan a year later found bad news: The cancer was back — this time in her other lung.

Leaked HSBC Documents Shed Light On Swiss Banking Industry

A huge trove of leaked documents is shedding new light on the secretive Swiss banking industry.

The documents were downloaded by a former computer security expert at the giant bank HSBC, and they were released over the weekend by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

Tonya DeBerry (center) and her children, Herbert Nelson and Allison Nelson, have all been held in Ferguson and Jennings jails for unpaid traffic tickets.

Civil Rights Attorneys Sue Ferguson Over 'Debtors Prisons'

In a new challenge to police practices in Ferguson, Mo., a group of civil rights lawyers is suing the city over the way people are jailed when they fail to pay fines for traffic tickets and other minor offenses.

The lawsuit, filed Sunday night on the eve of the six-month anniversary of the police shooting of Michael Brown, alleges that the city violates the Constitution by jailing people without adequately considering whether they were indigent and, as a result, unable to pay.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio tours and meets with youth at Second Chance Housing on Rikers Island on December 17, 2014 in New York City. Second Chance Housing is alternative housing for incarcerated adolescents instead of punitive segregation, also known as solitary confinement.

To End Solitary Confinement, Rikers Steps Out Of The Box

New York's Rikers Island is the second-largest jail in the U.S., and one of the most notorious.

But with a single move, Rikers has taken the lead on prison reform on one issue: Last month, the prison banned the use of solitary confinement for inmates under 21 years old.

Amy Fettig, senior staff counsel for the ACLU's National Prison Project, says the use of isolation is too widespread and that it's being used for the wrong reasons. Often young people are even isolated for their own protection.

A pickup truck bursts into flames as a riot breaks out outside of a soccer match between Egyptian Premier League clubs Zamalek and ENPPI at Air Defense Stadium, in a suburb east of Cairo, on Sunday.

More Than Two Dozen Killed In Riot At Egyptian Soccer Match

A riot outside of a major soccer match broke out in Egypt Sunday night. Authorities said the stampede and fighting between fans and police killed at least 25 people.

The riot comes just three years after similar violence left more than 70 people dead in 2012.

The stampede occurred before a match between Egyptian Premier League clubs Zamalek and ENPPI at Air Defense Stadium east of Cairo.

Customers browse the pot products at Cannabis City in Seattle. In Washington, the 2012 initiative to legalize pot was sold as a way to decrease expenses for local governments.

Cities Argue For a Bigger Share Of Pot Tax Revenue

When voters in four U.S. states — Colorado, Washington, Alaska and Oregon — approved recreational marijuana sales, part of the appeal was the promise of a new revenue source to buoy cash-strapped cities and states.

But tensions are growing in those four states over how the tax rewards from pot sales should be divided. Local governments want to get what they say is their share of pot tax revenues.

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