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Kobus alerted his managers that a supervisor was allowing favorite employees to take time off for their birthdays, so the government had to pay more for other people at the agency to work overtime. "You know, this is not our money. This is the taxpayers' money, and I want it to be correct," he says.

A Decade After Blowing The Whistle On The FBI, Vindication

Robert Kobus doesn't fit the stereotype of the disgruntled employee. He worked in administrative jobs at the FBI for 34 years, and he says he's seen the bureau at its best.

"My sister Deborah Kobus was a 9/11 victim, and the FBI treated me so well during that time," he says. "You know they really cared. I had a lot of friends, I know how important it is to have a strong FBI."

His sister died in the World Trade Center's south tower. When he helped walk out the last piece of steel at the site, he proudly wore his FBI jacket.

The Space Station Gets A Coffee Bar

In space, all they have is instant.

"For an instant coffee, it's an excellent instant coffee," says Vickie Kloeris, who manages the space station's food supply for NASA. Astronauts are allotted up to three freeze-dried cups (pouches, actually) a day, and Kloeris says it's "extremely popular."

But, she adds, "can it compete with brewed espresso? No."

Joel Heitkamp smiles while broadcasting in 2009 at AM radio station KFGO in Fargo, N.D.

Radio Connects North Dakota Residents Divided On Gay Rights

This week, Morning Edition discusses gay rights in North Dakota, one of 13 states that still bans same-sex marriage. Wednesday's story features two men with contrasting ideologies, a liberal radio host and a conservative business owner.

North Dakota is a state where radio reigns supreme. Its communities are far apart, and shopping trips, or just visiting a neighbor, can mean a long drive. Many people have the radio on, and often it's tuned into KFGO-AM, The Mighty 790, out of Fargo.

Martha and Alvaro Galvis used to travel from New Hampshire to Boston to watch the marathon every year. Both were hurt in the bombing two years ago.

Bombing Survivors Face A World That Still Feels Out Of Control

It's just the crumb of a muffin, but Martha Galvis must pick it up. Lips clenched, eyes narrowed, she pushes it back and forth across a slick table, then in circles.

"I struggle and struggle until," Galvis pauses, concentrating all her attention on the thumb and middle finger of her left hand. She can't get them to close around the crumb.

"I try as much as I can, and if I do it, I'm so happy — so happy," she says, giggling.

Workers pick asparagus at Del Bosque Farms in Firebaugh, Calif., April 6, 2015. This year, some farmers in the state will get water, others won't, simply based on when their land was first irrigated.

Redistribute California's Water? Not Without A Fight

The state of California is asking a basic question right now that people often fight over: What's a fair way to divide up something that's scarce and valuable? That "something," in this case, is water.

There's a lot at stake, including your very own nuts, fruit and vegetables, because most of the water that's up for grabs in California goes to farmers. This year, some farmers will get water, and others will not, simply based on when their land was first irrigated.

John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans.

John Wilkes Booth Was Not A Deranged Lone Madman, Historian Says

President Lincoln's killer, John Wilkes Booth, is largely regarded as a deranged lone gunman.

But historian Terry Alford, an expert on all things Booth, tells Morning Editon's Renee Montagne that's not the case. His new book, Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, tells the story of a well-liked actor and his life — before Booth went down in history as the man who assassinated a president.

Students take the annual College Scholastic Ability Test, or college entrance exam, at a high school in Seoul last November. Students face enormous pressure to do well on the test and get into a top university. Airplanes are grounded on the day of the test so they won't disturb the students.

The All-Work, No-Play Culture Of South Korean Education

In South Korea, grim stories of teen suicide come at a regular clip. Recently, two 16-year-old girls in Daejeon jumped to their deaths, leaving a note saying, "We hate school."

It's just one tragedy in a country where suicide is the leading cause of death among teens, and 11 to 15 year-olds report the highest amount of stress out of 30 developed nations.

As China continues its massive economic growth, especially in cities, the government continues to severely limit people's rights. Is that system sustainable?

From Horses To High-Rises: An Insider 'Unmasks' China's Economic Rise

When Henry Paulson first visited Beijing in 1991 as a banker, cars still shared major roads with horses.

"I remember getting into a taxi that drove too fast on a two-lane highway ... [that was] clogged with bicycles and horses pulling carts," says the former secretary of treasury under George W. Bush. "You still saw the hutongs — the old neighborhoods [with narrow streets] — which were very, very colorful and an important part of life."

Congress Approves Longer-Term Fix For Medicare Reimbursements

The Senate gave final passage Tuesday night to a lasting fix for a long-running problem with Medicare reimbursements for doctors, NPR's Giles Snyder reports. Doctors faced a 21 percent reduction in the fees.

Eight senators, all Republicans, voted against the bill because funding has not been fully allocated for its $214 billion cost. According to the Congressional Budget Office, the bill will add $141 billion to the federal budget deficit in the next decade.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and President Obama meet at the White House on Tuesday. The prime minister is visiting to discuss the fight against the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

Iraqi Leader Visits Washington Looking For Help In Fight Against Islamic State

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi is in Washington this week, trying to drum up financial and military support for his country. His first stop today was the White House, where he met with President Obama.

The administration promised $200 million in humanitarian assistance for Iraqis uprooted by violence. But the heart of the discussion was the joint fight against the self-proclaimed Islamic State.