National News

11 Missing In Black Hawk Helicopter Crash In Florida

An Army National Guard helicopter went down with seven Marines and a crew of four aboard last night. The aircraft had been part of a training exercise at Eglin Air Force Base in the Florida Panhandle, according to the base's public affairs office.

Update at 9 a.m. ET: Some Human Remains Recovered

The flight crew and Marines are feared dead; the Air Force says their names are being withheld, pending next-of-kin notification.

9 Iraqi Interpreters Sue U.S. Government Over Visa Delays

During a decade of war, U.S. troops relied on interpreters — thousands of Iraqis and Afghans — who worked and often fought alongside Americans.

Many of them were promised visas to the U.S. but they have been waiting for years with no answer. Now, nine Iraqis are suing the U.S. government to get their status resolved.

All the Iraqis in the lawsuit go by code names because of ongoing threats to their lives.

Plaintiff Alpha was in an ambush with U.S. troops and got shot in the back, but he continued to work with the U.S. military after he recovered.

Veterans Choice Act Fails To Ease Travel Burdens For Vets In Need Of Care

Veterans who need to see a doctor often have to travel long distances – 40 miles or more – to get to a Department of Veterans Affairs facility. So last year, after scandals involving long wait times for vets, Congress tried to make getting care easier.

The Veterans Choice Act gives veterans the option of using a doctor outside the VA system if VA facilities are more than 40 miles away, or there's more than a 30-day wait for an appointment.

Shlomy Mizrahi, an Israeli real estate agent, stands near a sign at the entrance to a Palestinian village in the West Bank. The Israeli government bars Israelis from entering the Palestinian towns for their safety. Mizrahi lives in the nearby Israeli settlement of Ariel and sells homes there.

In The West Bank, Living Side By Side — But Agreeing On Nothing

No matter how much you've read about the struggle for land in the Middle East, it deepens your understanding to visit an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.

The Israeli settlements, founded in areas that Israel captured in the 1967 Six-Day War, raise some of the more contentious issues in the conflict.

Israel is under pressure to stop building them, and eventually to surrender many of them to make way for a future Palestinian state. The United Nations long ago said they are not legal, and critics of Israel cite them as a reason to boycott or divest from the Jewish state.

A driver operates a haul truck in the Ray Mine near Kearny, Ariz. Falling copper prices have residents of some small mining towns in Arizona worried as shrinking revenues bring layoffs.

With Prices Down And Layoffs Up, Copper Industry Still Looks To Grow

The price of copper is down more than 40 percent from its peak just four years ago. Some of that is due to a drop-off in construction activity in the United States and China. The trend has some small mining towns in Arizona worried as shrinking revenues are starting to translate into layoffs.

It's hard to miss the Ray Mine near Kearny in southern Arizona. The open-pit copper mine spans nearly two square miles and extends more than 1,000 feet into the ground.

Renewable energy sources — such as the Eolo wind park about 75 miles south of the Nicaraguan capital, Managua — generate about half of the country's electricity. Officials predict that figure could rise to 80 percent within years.

Nicaragua's Renewable Energy Revolution Picks Up Steam

Nicaragua produces no oil, but is a land of fierce winds, tropical sun and rumbling volcanoes. In other words, it's a renewable energy paradise — and today the Central American nation is moving quickly to become a green energy powerhouse. Within a few years the vast majority of Nicaragua's electricity will come from hydroelectric dams, geothermal plants and wind farms.

Nicaragua's largest wind farm lies on the shores of giant Lake Nicaragua, which stretches halfway across the country.

States Aim To Restrict Medically-Induced Abortions

Of the million or so women who have abortions every year in the U.S., nearly a quarter end their pregnancy using medications. But just as states have been passing a record number of restrictions on surgical abortion, more are trying to limit this option as well.

One of the country's strictest laws is in Ohio. To understand it, a little history helps.

Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim, right, speaks with an official during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Duke in Durham, N.C., on Feb. 28

Deford: NCAA Fans Continue To Drink Deeply Of The (Sports) Spirits

OK, after an eight-year investigation, the NCAA hit Syracuse University and its basketball coach, Jim Boeheim, with all sorts of penalties for academic and recruiting violations. Normally in sports media, nobody is particularly surprised whenever any coach is caught, so a great deal of speculation was then diverted to how this might affect Boeheim's "legacy."

Don Blankenship, former CEO of Massey Energy, faces trial on federal conspiracy charges related to the 2010 fatal explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia.

Feds Add Coal-Dust Coverup Allegation To Mine CEO's Indictment

Six weeks before a landmark mine disaster trial, federal prosecutors in West Virginia have added a new allegation to the criminal conspiracy charges lodged against former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship.

Ferguson, Mo., City Manager Out Amid Shakeup

The Ferguson, Mo., City Council removed John Shaw as city manager today following last week's U.S. Justice Department report that accused the local police and justice system of racial bias.

Jason Rosenbaum, a reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, tweeted the news of the City Council resolution that removed Shaw from his position.

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