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French President Francois Hollande gestures as he delivers a speech to foreign ambassadors during a ceremony to extend New Year wishes at the Elysee Palace in Paris on Friday.

Hollande: Anti-'Charlie' Protesters Don't Understand French Values

French President Francois Hollande says people protesting the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo do not understand the French attachment to freedom of speech.

His statement comes amid protests over the publication's depiction of the Prophet Muhammad on its latest cover that went to press just days after 10 of its journalists were gunned down in Paris by Muslim extremists. Those protests have turned violent in Algeria, Pakistan and Niger, where at least two Christian churches were set fire.

Travelers wait to check in for charter flights from Miami to Havana at Miami International Airport.

Traveling To Cuba Getting Easier, But Expect Turbulence On The Way

New rules that went into effect on Friday mark the biggest change in U.S. relations with Cuba in more than 50 years.

While tourism remains off-limits, the Obama administration opened new opportunities in Cuba for banks, airlines, telecommunications companies and regular Americans.

For the first time in decades, under the new rules, Americans who don't have family on the island can travel to Cuba without receiving special permission from the U.S. government.

No Tourists Allowed — Yet

Robert Duvall (right) was nominated for Best Supporting Actor for his role in <em>The Judge</em>, which also starred Robert Downey Jr. The nomination left many critics scratching their heads.

And The Oscar Goes To ... Wait, Who Hasn't Had One In A While?

"The right actors win Oscars, but for the wrong roles," Katherine Hepburn once said.

The Motion Picture Academy has a history of rewarding stars for less-than-celestial performances, and this week's Oscar nomination announcements left a lot of people scratching their heads — over the snubs for Selma, for example, and the nomination of Robert Duvall for best supporting actor in The Judge.

"I think most people hadn't even heard of The Judge before that nomination," says Alyssa Rosenberg, culture columnist for The Washington Post.

Eurostar's Siemens e320 train is seen at St. Pancras station in central London, in November. The passenger train plies the Channel Tunnel connecting London and Paris.

Undersea Tunnel In Europe Shut Down After Fire; No Injuries

The undersea train tunnel that connects England and France has been closed until further notice after a fire broke out on a truck that was being transported through the Channel Tunnel, triggering an alarm and suspending all passenger and freight service.

There were no reports of injuries.

"Rail passengers are advised to expect significant delays whilst the vehicle is being recovered and fumes are cleared from the tunnels," the police said in an emailed statement reported by Reuters.

According to Reuters:

Provo, Utah, is one of three cities in which Google is rolling out its Google Fiber gigabit Internet and television service.

As Cities Push For Their Own Broadband, Cable Firms Say Not So Fast

Americans increasingly see decently fast Internet as more like a functioning sewer line than a luxury.

And a number of cities are trying to get into the Internet provider business, but laws in 19 states hamper those efforts. President Obama announced this week that he wants to lift those restrictions, and supporters of what is known as municipal broadband can't wait.

A sampling of dishes served at United Noshes dinner parties. From left: feta-stuffed peppers from Greece; noodles in cold broth from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (better known as North Korea); mojitos from Cuba; grilled quail with chili-ginger marinade from Congo.

United Noshes: Dinner Party Aims To Eat Its Way Through Global Cuisine

The United Nations has 193 member states. And United Noshes aims to recreate meals from every last one of them, alphabetically, as a series of dinner parties.

The undated portrait photo shows Ahmed Awad bin Mubarak, chief of staff for Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. Bin Mubarak was kidnapped on Saturday in Sanaa.

Gunmen Kidnap Top Official In Yemen

Gunmen in Yemen have abducted President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi's chief of staff from his vehicle in the center of the capital, Sanaa, according to security officials who blame Shiite Houthi rebels for the kidnapping.

Ahmed Awad bin Mubarak and two of his body guards were seized early Saturday, officials say. The Associated Press quotes unnamed officials as saying the three were kidnapped when they stopped their car in the capital. No ransom demand has been made and so far no one has claimed responsibility.

Wearing a yellow raincoat, Pope Francis gives a thumbs up to the faithful as he arrives in Tacloban, Philippines, on Saturday.

Storm Causes Pope To Cut Short Visit To Typhoon Hit Tacloban

A storm forced Pope Francis to cut short a visit to the Philippine city of Tacloban, where Typhoon Haiyan made a devastating landfall last year, killing at least 6,300 people in the predominately Catholic country.

In Nigeria, Boko Haram Continues Its Campaign Of Terror

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Hollande's Approval Soars After Terror Attacks

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