National News

On Eve Of Referendum, Many Fear For Ukrainian Economy

Michelle Obama tweeted this picture of herself on May 7, in support of the kidnapped Nigerian girls.

Michelle Obama: Nigerian Girls 'Embody The Best Hope For The Future'

In her first solo weekly address, first lady Michelle Obama said the U.S. is committed to standing up for the more than 200 Nigerian girls who were kidnapped from their school weeks ago.

"In these girls, Barack and I see our own daughters," she said. "We see their hopes and their dreams — and we can only imagine the anguish their parents are feeling right now."

Obama said the terrorist group that took responsibility for the kidnappings was "attempting to snuff out the aspirations of young girls."

Beats headphones are sold alongside iPods in an Apple store in New York City. Apple is reportedly considering buying Beats for more than $3 billion.

Tech Week: Target CEO Out, Drones In Question, Apple's Big Deal

Another week in tech is wrapping up with talk of another multi-billion dollar buy. Let's get to it with our roundup, starting with the ICYMI section, which features stories we've been telling on air and online, the Big Conversations in tech and closing with our Curiosities — other fun links you should see.

British schoolchildren outside an adobe hut that was built so they could play in a less noisy place when jets fly overhead. The kids go to school near London's Heathrow Airport, where a planes takeoff and land every 90 seconds.

How Loud Is Too Loud? A High-Decibel Debate On Expanding Heathrow

Pippins Primary School is just one of dozens of schools in the neighborhoods that surround London's Heathrow Airport. At recess the students play outside on an asphalt playground. And like clockwork, a jet roars just several hundred feet overhead every 90 seconds. The school is almost directly under Heathrow's flight path.

"It is very loud. It's as if you were standing on the runways," said Janet Mills, a teacher at Pippins. Heathrow is one of the world's busiest airports, and every day Mills faces the challenge of teaching right next door to it.

As far as stock images go, this one of Korean barbecue seems pretty tasty.

With Great Korean Barbecue Comes Great Responsibility

Go hunting for the best barbecue in America and you might end up in a city that surprises you: Los Angeles. Specifically, the L.A. neighborhood known as Koreatown.

I'm talking about Korean barbecue. If you're unfamiliar, that's thinly sliced, marinated meat grilled right in front of you. Trust me, it's awesome (this guy knows what I'm talking about).

Gajar ka Halwa, a sweet carrot pudding dessert, requires patience. So do relationships that bridge a cultural divide.

Bridging The Cultural Gap With A Mother-In-Law In The Kitchen

In Indian kitchens, patience is a virtue.

Vegetables must be chopped, lentils soaked, spices roasted and ground before slowly simmering everything together. If you try to cut corners, the food just isn't the same.

The same is true for some relationships.

My mother-in-law, Rama Saini, grew up in north India in the early years after independence from the British. At age 19, her marriage was arranged and she moved to Canada with her husband. By 30 she had three children and a thriving business.

Rep. Coya Knutson (D-Minn.), is shown shopping in a supermarket in 1955 following her demand to know why her fellow housewives remain saddled with high grocery bills while farm income continues to drop.

The Congresswoman Whose Husband Called Her Home

Fifty-six years ago this weekend, newspapers across the nation told a sad tale of a family seemingly imploding.

At the center of the story was Coya Knutson, the opera-singing daughter of a Norwegian farmer, and the first woman from Minnesota elected to Congress.

Voted in on her own merits, not appointed to keep a late husband's seat warm for a successor, the trailblazing young mother could only watch as vengeful party rivals, a manufactured scandal, and a feckless, alcoholic husband combined to sabotage her career.

The RNC wants to see many fewer of these presidential debate scenes in 2016. Before a November 2011 Michigan showdown, from left: former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum; Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann; former House Speaker Newt Gingrich; former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney; businessman Herman Cain; Texas Gov. Rick Perry; Texas Rep. Ron Paul; former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman.

New Rules Aim To Streamline GOP's 2016 Nominating Process

If there are other Herman Cains and Michele Bachmanns out there with 2016 presidential hopes, it may be much harder than it was in 2012 for them to go from "who?" to Republican presidential contenders. That's because of new rules adopted Friday by the Republican National Committee at its meeting in Memphis, Tenn.

Judge Strikes Down Arkansas Ban On Gay Marriage

A judge in Arkansas has struck down the state's ban on same-sex marriage, a move that clears the way for gay couples to wed.

Here's the judge's order, via Chris Johnson, chief political and White House reporter for the Washington Blade.

Fried cod awaits its destiny as fish and chips in London.

Europeans Are Getting Fatter, Just Like Americans

Ireland is predicted to become the fattest country in Europe by 2030, according to a study released by the World Health Organization and the UK Health Forum.

As many as 90 percent of Irish men and 84 percent of Irish women are projected to be classified as overweight or obese by then. Blame goes to the usual culprits: unhealthy diets high in sugar and fats, and a lack of exercise.

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