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Wang, a young human rights lawyer, argues that Chinese people have to push the government to build a system of rule of law. She did not want her full face shown to protect her identity.

A Rare, Spontaneous Democracy Debate In A Shanghai Taxi

Editor's Note: NPR's Frank Langfitt has been driving around Shanghai offering free rides as part of his "Streets of Shanghai" stories. But recently, he was a passenger in a taxi when something unusual happened.

Strangers rarely discuss politics in public in China, let alone the taboo topic, democracy. The Communist Party sees talk of political alternatives as a direct threat and has jailed people for promoting such ideas online.

Climate Change Meeting To Focus On Ensuring Countries Keep Commitments

The world's governments are meeting today in Bonn, Germany, to work on a U.N. agreement to tackle climate change, a day after European energy companies urged them to adopt a pricing system for carbon emissions.

NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce, who is reporting on the story for our Newscast unit, says the meeting in Bonn is part of the run-up to a major climate summit being held in Paris at the end of the year. Here's more from Nell:

The relative of a worker who died in the 2013 Rana Plaza collapse mourns April 24 in front of a monument erected in memory of the victims. Authorities charged more than 40 people today with murder in connection with the building's collapse that killed 1,137 people.

Murder Charges In Bangladesh Over 2013 Garment Factory Collapse

Authorities in Bangladesh have charged more than 40 people with murder in connection with the country's worst industrial accident that killed more than 1,100 people in 2013. Among those charged is Sohel Rana, the man who owned the Rana Plaza complex, the collapse of which injured another 2,500 people.

After A Week Of Flooding, Sunshine Forecast For Much Of Texas

The weather forecast for Texas is sunshine, just a week after flooding in the state killed at least 25 people and prompted President Obama to declare a disaster in the state.

Lauren Silverman of member station KERA tells our Newscast unit:

"Torrential rains have given Texas the wettest May in history. The National Weather Service says, in all, more than 37 trillion gallons of water have fallen in the state. Flooding ... swept away thousands of vehicles and trapped people in their cars and houses.

"What makes a game fun is not that it's easy," says Greg Toppo, "but that it's hard."

Exploding Myths About Learning Through Gaming

Part of our series of conversations with leading teachers, writers and activists on education issues.

If you had to pick the most promising — and possibly most overhyped — education trends of the last few years, right up there with the online college courses known as MOOCs would almost certainly rank this one: Game-based learning shall deliver us to the Promised Land!

Deputy Attorney General nominee Sally Yates testified in March before the Senate Judiciary Committee on her nomination. The Senate confirmed her last month to be deputy attorney general, putting two women in the top posts at the Justice Department.

No. 2 At Justice Warns Growing Prison Budget Detracts From Public Safety

Prosecutors usually spend their energy putting criminals behind bars — not urging their release. But racial disparities in the system and the huge costs of locking up so many people are pushing some government officials to call for a new approach.

One of them is the woman who now runs day-to-day operations at the Justice Department. Sally Yates says she's hardly soft on crime: "I'm a career prosecutor."

Jiya Bavishi's auditory brainstem implant is helping her hear some sounds for the first time.

New Hearing Technology Brings Sound To A Little Girl

Jiya Bavishi was born deaf. For five years, she couldn't hear and she couldn't speak at all. But when I first meet her, all she wants to do is say hello. The 6-year-old is bouncing around the room at her speech therapy session in Dallas. She's wearing a bright pink top; her tiny gold earrings flash as she waves her arms.

"Hi," she says, and then uses sign language to ask who I am and talk about the ice cream her father bought for her.

Editing The Climate Talkers: Punctuation's Effect On Earth's Fate

In Bonn, Germany, hundreds of people have gathered to work on a draft version of a major United Nations agreement to control greenhouse gas emissions that are changing the Earth's climate.

And when I found out that climate change negotiations basically all boil down to writing and editing a document, I was intrigued.

The National Hurricane Center introduced a new storm surge forecast map this year. This map, centered on New Orleans, is a prototype.

10 Years Since Katrina: A Look Back At The Busiest Hurricane Season

Ten years ago, the U.S. experienced its busiest hurricane season ever recorded. The year saw 28 named storms — 15 of them hurricanes — including Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast. Four major hurricanes hit the U.S. in 2005, beginning in July with Hurricane Dennis.

How A Drunken Chipmunk Voice Helps Send A Public Service Message

You get a voicemail message from a friend. Her voice sounds a little ... weird. Like a chipmunk who had too much to drink.

After her message, you're told you can push a button on the phone and hear another kind of message: say, job listings in your neighborhood or tips on how to stop the spread of Ebola.

That's how a new game called Polly works. It was designed by computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University to help get useful information to people with little or no reading skills.