National News

Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, smiles beside Nancy Retzlaff, Turing's chief commercial officer, during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on Capitol Hill on Thursday.

No Comment From Grinning Martin Shkreli At House Hearing On Drug Prices

Martin Shkreli, the former pharmaceutical executive who inspired wrath when he raised the price of a life-saving drug by 5,000 percent, appeared before the House Oversight Committee on Thursday for a hearing on prescription drug prices.

But his testimony was far from fruitful.

Amelia Westerdale works with physics students during a tutorial session at the University of Colorado Boulder. Westerdale is part of the Learning Assistant Program, tasked with helping to coach and tutor students.

Making Science Teaching More Than 'A Backup Plan'

"Squat! Squat! Squat! Higher! Faster!"

In the basement of the Duane Physics and Astrophysics building at the University of Colorado Boulder, a science demonstration is going on, but it looks more like a vaudeville act.

One by one, students balance precariously on a rotating platform. Then they are handed what looks like a spinning bicycle wheel, holding it by two handles that stick out from either side of what would be the hub of the wheel. When you flip the wheel over, like a pizza, your body starts rotating in the opposite direction.

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner talks with former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley as he files paperwork for the New Hampshire primary at Concord City Hall back in November. O'Malley has since ended his campaign.

Meet The Guard Dog Who Keeps The New Hampshire Primary First

For the past 40 years, New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary status has been vigorously defended by one man: Secretary of State Bill Gardner.

He is the nation's longest-serving secretary of state, taking office in 1976, one year before New Hampshire lawmakers mandated that the Granite State go first in primary voting.

Two children whose school was bombed in Aleppo pose in a mock destroyed classroom — set up by the charity Save the Children — outside the Houses of Parliament in London on Wednesday, one day before a donor conference aiming to raise money for victims of Syria's war.

Diplomats Pledge $10 Billion In Aid For Syria At Donor Conference

At a one-day donor meeting in London, leaders and diplomats from 20 countries around the world have gathered to pledge funds to help victims of the ongoing crisis in Syria.

They hoped to raise $9 billion; they pledged a total of $10 billion.

You can see some of the pledges, and hear about the conference from NPR's Greg Myre, over at Here & Now.

Among the noteworthy pledges: The U.S. has committed about $900 million, and Britain has offered $1.75 billion between now and 2020.

Actor Shannon Kook poses on the cover of the 2016 Haikus with Hotties calendar.

Got A Second For 'Haikus With Hotties'? Now You Can Enjoy Them All Year

In my house growing up, the walls of every room — including the bathroom — were decorated with several calendars. (Is this a Chinese-American thing? An immigrant family thing? I've always wondered.)

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange reads a statement from the balcony of the Ecuadorean Embassy in central London in 2012. Assange took refuge at the embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden where he faces allegations of sex crimes, which he denies.

Julian Assange Says He Will Surrender If U.N. Panel Rules Against Him

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says he will leave the Ecuadorean Embassy in London and submit to arrest on Friday if a U.N. panel rules against him. Assange had taken refuge at the embassy in 2012, seeking to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning over an allegation of rape.

In a statement posted on the WikiLeaks Twitter feed, Assange writes:

The city of Flint, Mich., may not have enough money in the future to pay for repairing broken water mains and replacing sewer lines.

Unpaid Water Bills In Flint Could Hinder Repairs

High levels of lead in their drinking water have Flint, Mich., residents relying on cases of bottled water for just about everything. So it may come as no surprise that thousands of them have stopped paying their water bills.

Lynna Kaucheck of the not-for-profit group Food and Water Watch delivered 21,000 signatures to the Flint mayor's office last week calling for a moratorium on drinking water bills.

"All of this is a lot for people to handle, and enough is enough," she said. "Flint residents need relief."

Chef Eric Ziebold (center left) works with his kitchen staff at CityZen in Washington, D.C., in 2012. CityZen closed in 2014 when Ziebold left to open his own restaurant.

'Chasing An Ideal,' World-Class Chefs Find Themselves Under Extreme Pressure

The world of haute cuisine lost one of its brightest stars over the weekend.

Benoit Violier, a French Swiss chef who many said was the best in the world, died in his home in Switzerland in what appears to have been a suicide. He was 44.

Violier owned the Restaurant de l'Hôtel de Ville in Crissier, near Lausanne. It's one of the few restaurants in the world to be awarded three Michelin stars.

Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio speaks to a capacity crowd during a campaign event in Exeter, N.H.

Signs Of 'Marco-mentum' For Rubio In New Hampshire

In New Hampshire, the night after the Iowa caucuses, it was hard not to feel the "Marco-mentum."

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio stood on a stage surrounded by more than 700 rowdy supporters, who filled Exeter's picturesque town hall to the brink.

Rubio delivered the same stump speech he's been sticking to for months. But Tuesday night, fresh off his surprisingly strong third-place Iowa finish, the crowd ate up every line.

In New Orleans, Court-Appointed Lawyers Turning Away Suspects

When you enter the lobby of the Orleans Public Defender's Office, expect a bit of a wait, because receptionist Chastity Tillman will likely be busy on the phone.

"The jail calls. We get them every second," Tillman says.

Pages