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Three months ago, producer Ross Putman started tracking descriptions of female characters from scripts he read. On Tuesday, he shared them with the world on his Twitter account, "Fem Script Intros."

Meet The Guy Calling Out Hollywood For How It Describes Women

Hollywood producer Ross Putman says he's read thousands of scripts during his time working in the film industry in Los Angeles, and over the years, he began to find one pattern particularly problematic: the way female characters are introduced.

Here's a sampling: leggy, attractive, blonde, beautiful, hot, gorgeous, pretty, sexy.

Can Dementia Be Prevented? Education May Bolster Brain Against Risk

The odds of getting Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia are declining for people who are more educated and avoiding heart disease, a study finds. The results suggest that people may have some control over their risk of dementia as they age.

This isn't the first study to find that the incidence of dementia is waning, but it may be the best so far. Researchers looked at 30 years of records from more than 5,000 people in the famed Framingham Heart Study, which has closely tracked the health of volunteers in Framingham, Mass.

Katherine Du/NPR

The Risks (And Unexpected Benefits) Of Sending Health Students Abroad

Melissa Melby, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Delaware, was pleased to hear a pre-med undergraduate excitedly describe participating in a brief medical outreach program to an impoverished Central American community. That is, until the student proudly recounted how she had performed a pelvic exam on a patients at the local clinic.

Combines harvest a corn field in Grand Island, Neb.

Buy Crop Insurance, Double Your Money

Deep in the heart of the arcane laws that give farmers a helping hand, there's something called "crop insurance." It's a huge program, costing taxpayers anywhere from $5 billion to $10 billion each year.

It's called an insurance program, and it looks like insurance. Farmers buy policies from private companies and pay premiums (which are cheap because of government subsidies) to insure themselves against crop failures and falling prices. It's mainly used by corn, soybean, cotton and wheat farmers. Defenders of the program call it a safety net.

Polling Is Ubiquitous, But Is It Bad For Democracy?

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Media wait at a checkpoint about 4 miles from the Malheur Wildlife Refuge Headquarters near Burns, Ore., as the sun rises on Thursday. The FBI had surrounded the last four protesters holed up at a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon and were waiting for them to surrender.

Oregon Occupation Ends As Last Holdout Surrenders

After 41 days, the Oregon occupation is over: All four militants who remained at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge have surrendered to the FBI.

A woman with a cut on her cheek and trouble seeing with her left eye was admitted to Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. X-rays show a projectile that surgeons decided to remove.

How To Operate On A Patient Who Might Explode

In the summer of 2014, a 23-year-old pregnant woman entered the military hospital at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan with a cut on her left cheek. The wound had been stitched up elsewhere, but she still wasn't quite right.

She said she'd been hit in the face by a ricochet back in her home village. What hit her exactly, she couldn't say for sure. She was upset, though, because the vision was bad in her left eye, even though there had been no apparent trauma to it.

Chart: Access To Contraception And Abortion In Zika-Affected Countries

Don't get pregnant.

That's the advice given to women by the governments of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and El Salvador in light of a possible link between the Zika virus, which is spreading in those countries, and a birth defect called microcephaly, which results in an abnormally small head and possible brain damage. Brazil has reported thousands of cases of microcephaly since the outbreak began there last spring; researchers are trying to determine whether the virus is the cause.

Russ Finch holds up half of a Cara Cara orange grown in his geothermal greenhouse in Alliance, Neb.

Citrus In The Snow: Geothermal Greenhouses Grow Local Produce In Winter

For the Midwesterner who likes to eat local, this time of year is a challenge. Browse the produce shelves in middle America — or any place where snow falls in winter — and you'll find carrots from Mexico and peppers from Peru.

Some visionaries think greenhouses could help meet demand for year-round local produce. But there's a problem with greenhouses: They can be energy guzzlers, typically lit and heated by burning fossil fuels.

Belkiz Halip and her children Eye (left) and Zehra fled bombing in Aleppo to a tent city close to the Bab al-Salam crossing on the Turkish-Syrian border.

U.N. Says 300,000 People In Key Syrian City Are At Risk Of Siege

The push by Syrian government forces and their allies has put around 300,000 civilians in the northern city of Aleppo at risk of being placed under siege and cut off from food and humanitarian supplies, according to the U.N.

Since the start of last week, the offensive has displaced some 51,000 civilians from what was Syria's biggest city before the start of the war, the United Nations says.

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