National News

Andy Kohut led the Pew Research Center from 2004-2012 and was on NPR's air for decades.

An Authority On Public Opinion Polling, Born Of His Respect For People

It is hard to imagine a presidential election cycle at NPR without the warm presence and reassuring wisdom of Andy Kohut.

The man who founded the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, and who later served as president of the expanded Pew Research Center from 2004 to 2012, died early Tuesday after years battling leukemia. He was 73.

Immigrant families board a bus headed to the downtown bus station in McAllen, Texas, after being released by the Border Patrol.

Federal Requests For Immigration Holds Continue To Decline

Federal immigration officials are issuing far fewer detainer requests, also known as immigration holds, to state and local law enforcement agencies seeking immigrants who are in this country illegally. At the same time, the requests that are issued don't appear to be targeting serious, or convicted, criminals.

The Nepalese city of Pokhara is where Dahlia Yehia was reportedly beaten to death by the local man she was staying with.

Young Woman's Death In Nepal Spotlights Travel Safety

It's not exactly clear why Dahlia Yehia was in Nepal. Was she trekking? Did she want to volunteer to help earthquake victims?

Preemies' Survival Rates Improve, But Many Challenges Remain

These are the tiniest babies born. Some weigh only a pound or two. And can fit in the palm of your hand.

Extreme preemies — born somewhere between 22 and 28 weeks — have a better chance of surviving now than they did 20 years ago, doctors report Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association. But many of these babies still have severe health problems.

Cellphone Records Could Help Predict Dengue Outbreak

Cellphone records could help epidemiologists predict which cities and towns might be hit next by dengue, the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne disease in the world.

That's because cellphone records let scientists track how people actually move around, says Amy Wesolowski, a researcher who models epidemics at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.

With three more Democratic Senators backing the Iran accord, President Obama is heading towards a big foreign policy victory.

Senate Democrats Have Enough Support For Iran Nuclear Deal To Squelch Opposition

Senate Democrats are on the verge of delivering a big win to President Obama on the nuclear agreement between the U.S., Iran and five other world powers.

With three more Democrats announcing Tuesday they were backing the accord, it gave supporters enough votes to prevent the passage of a disapproval resolution. Any such resolution would sink the White House-backed nuclear deal that lifts sanctions on Tehran in exchange for Iran curbing its nuclear program.

The parts of the brain known to help process fear and negative emotion are hyperactive when someone with math anxiety confronts a tricky problem, scientists say.

1 Tutor + 1 Student = Better Math Scores, Less Fear

Math can be as scary as spiders and snakes, at least in the brain of an 8-year-old child. And that early anxiety about dealing with numbers can put a child at a significant disadvantage, not only in school but in negotiating life and a career. Fortunately, a study of third-graders, published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests an intervention that can help. One-on-one tutoring does more than teach kids, the researchers say. It calms the fear circuitry in the brain.

Flowers and candles are set up as a memorial in front of the entrance to Hartford Distributors following a shooting Aug. 4, 2010, in Manchester, Conn. Eight employees were killed by a former worker.

The Challenges Of Identifying Potential Workplace Violence

The shootings on live TV of two young journalists last month highlighted, once again, the perils of dealing with potentially dangerous employees. Prior to the Roanoke, Va.-area attack, former employee and alleged shooter Vester Flanagan showed some violent tendencies at work. But it can be very difficult for employers to know when — and how — to step in.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks to the graduates of the Boys and Girls High School in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn in New York.

New York City Mayor Goes All-In On Free Preschool

In New York City, some 65,000 children have enrolled in Mayor Bill de Blasio's new, universal preschool program. To put that number in context, that's more than all the public school students — in all grades — in either Washington, D.C., or Boston. Free pre-K for all 4-year-olds was a key de Blasio campaign promise.

The Quintessential College Experience, Without The Big Bills

Going to college today is a very different experience than it once was. The cost has soared, and the great recession cut into many of the assets that were supposed to pay for it. This week All Things Considered is talking with young people — and in some cases their parents — about the value of school and about their choice of what kind of college to attend.

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