National News

Student Nicola Hopper, 11, and Jake Hensley, 11, load milk cartons and other food collected by students at Franklin Sherman Elementary School into crates to be taken across the street to Share food pantry at McLean Baptist Church.

When Food Banks Say No To Sugary Junk, Schools Offer A Solution

This is the time of year when donations to food banks spike. But, some food banks are getting pickier about what they'll accept.

Earlier this year the Capital Area Food Bank announced it would "dramatically" cut back on junk food it receives and distributes. This means saying "no" to donations such as sheet cakes, holiday candy, sugary sodas and other processed, bakery items.

Haitian nationals at a Mexican government immigration office near the port of entry between Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, and Nogales, Ariz., wait day after day for appointments with U.S. immigration agents so they can enter. As a result of the Haitian influx and a continuing surge of Central Americans on the Texas-Mexico border, the U.S. government has run out of detention space.

At The U.S.-Mexico Border, Haitians Arrive To A Harsh Reception

Desperate Haitian immigrants have been massing along the U.S.-Mexico border for months seeking humanitarian relief. In the past year more than 5,000 have sought entry into the United States — a 500 percent increase over the previous year.

After the catastrophic 2010 earthquake in Haiti, thousands of citizens migrated to Brazil looking for work. But as Brazil has slipped into recession in recent years, many of them have hit the road again, heading north on a 6,000-mile journey to the U.S. border — by every means of conveyance.

Chef Isabella has created a healthier and more savory alternative to sweet potato casserole.

At Thanksgiving, If You Take Sides, Make Sure They're As Tasty As These

It's Thanksgiving, which means you'll be seeing Aunt Martha's sweet potato casserole encased in a marshmallow cloud that has drifted too close to the sun. Cousin Joe, who's just here for the game, will bring his famous can-shaped cranberry sauce that looks like it's been attacked by a slinky. Then your sister will arrive with her sad concoction of green beans drowning in cream-of-mushroom soup, flecked with floating onion strings that have been flung like debris from the Titanic.

Sarah Gerhardt surfs Mavericks in northern California.<a href="http:// www.otwfront.com" target="_blank"></a>

Women Take On Big-Wave Surfing, Once The Domain Of Men, At Mavericks

Imagine a wave so big it darkens the horizon as it rolls in.

Just south of San Francisco, this surf spot is called Mavericks.

Sarah Gerhardt is the first women to surf this famously dangerous big-wave spot. She did that in 1999 when she was 24. Now, at 42, she's one of six women comprising the first women's heat in a surfing contest there.

The women will compete for $30,000 in the Titans of Mavericks, surfing waves that swell well beyond 30 feet.

How To Talk To Kids About Thanksgiving

You know the drill: Trace your hand, then add the details. Two feet, a beak, a single eyeball. Color it in, and voila! Hand becomes turkey.

You know the rest too: The Pilgrims fled England and landed on Plymouth Rock. The native people there, the Wampanoag, taught them to farm the land. In 1621, they sat down together for a thanksgiving feast, and we've been celebrating it ever since.

It's a lesson many remember from childhood, but the story has some problems.

President-elect Donald Trump points to a reporter at Trump International Hotel in Washington.

Can Trump's International Business Dealings Violate The Constitution?

Donald Trump's extensive business dealings around the globe have focused attention on an obscure provision of the Constitution most law professors barely look at – the Emoluments Clause. Now, one of the hottest legal debates around is whether the President-Elect is going to be violating the Constitution if he continues doing business with companies controlled by foreign governments.

Who even used the word "emolument" in an actual sentence before November 2016?

In March 2014, President Barack Obama directed Labor Secretary Tom Perez to modernize overtime protections. A federal judge Tuesday blocked implementation of the new rule set to go into effect Dec. 1

Federal Judge Blocks Obama Administration's Overtime Pay Rule

With just over a week before it was scheduled to take effect, a federal judge Tuesday blocked an Obama Administration rule that would have extended overtime eligibility to some four million Americans.

The Labor Department's sweeping overhaul to the overtime rule required employers to pay time-and-a-half to their employees who worked more than 40 hours in a given week and earned less than $47,476 a year.

Mohamed Gabril, a refugee who became an American citizen, works at a Somali-owned grocery in Utica, N.Y. He's convinced the U.S. Constitution will protect him from any backlash under Donald Trump.

In Upstate New York, A Refugee Haven Prepares For Trump Presidency

The city of Utica in upstate New York has been a model of refugee resettlement for 40 years.

Local leaders say immigrants from war-torn countries, including thousands of Muslim immigrants, have helped stabilize the population and economy. But now Utica is bracing for president-elect Donald Trump, who has promised big changes to America's refugee program.

Shelly Callahan, who runs the Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees, looked in on a class of refugees studying one of the most mysterious of skills: how to drive on icy roads in upstate New York.

Bruce Arena has been rehired to coach the U.S. Men's Soccer Team. He's previously coached the team from 1998-2006 where he posted a record of 71 wins, 30 losses and 29 draws.

U.S. Soccer Reaches Back To The Past To Kickstart Its Future

Bruce Arena is getting his old job back.

Arena is the winningest coach in the history of the United States Men's national team and is the only person to lead the U.S. team at two FIFA World Cups.

The announcement of Arena's return to the team comes a day after U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati parted ways with former U.S. Men's coach Jurgen Klinsmann.

Turkish women protest against a government proposal on Tuesday in Istanbul, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016. The sign in the middle reads: "We will not allow legalized rape with marriage!"

Turkey Withdraws Controversial Bill That Eased Penalties On Child Sexual Abuse

Turkey has tabled a controversial measure by the ruling party that would have allowed some sexual abusers of children to escape prison time if they married their victims. The bill was sharply criticized by opposition parties and human rights groups.

"The government was already on the defensive after demonstrations erupted to oppose the legal change," as NPR's Peter Kenyon tells our Newscast unit from Istanbul. "Critics said it amounted to a pardon for abusers, and more pain for their victims."

Pages