National News

Peshmerga look out from a front-line outpost — a few sandbags, soldiers, and grenades perched on the brow of a hill — to the eastern Iraqi town of Jalula. The Kurdish fighters are grappling with how to combat changing ISIS tactics.

Ambushes, Mines And Booby Traps: ISIS Militants Change Tack

At a front-line outpost — a few sandbags, soldiers and grenades perched on the brow of a hill — the Iraqi Kurdish soldiers known as Peshmerga are looking out toward the town of Jalula, maybe three miles away.

A few months ago, the so-called Islamic State seized Jalula in eastern Iraq. The Peshmerga took it back, but now the militants have retaken it. The soldiers catch sight of three vehicles belonging to the Islamic State rolling toward the outpost.

The police could be monitoring your cellphone.

Who's Catching Your Cellphone Conversations?

With the right equipment, people can hijack your cellphone, listen to your calls and read your texts, alarming privacy rights advocates and tech experts alike.

We know the eavesdropping is happening, but we don't know much about who's doing the listening. The police and other law enforcement agencies do it, but they have been restricted by the FBI from telling us about it. Beyond the police, the listeners could be the U.S. government, corporate spies or even foreign intelligence agencies.

Will A Sting, A Court Award And A Protest Help Stop Global Sex Trafficking?

This month, reports have come out that Laurie Holden, an actress from The Walking Dead TV show, had volunteered to be part of a sting in Colombia to entrap a local trafficker who sold girls as young as 12 into sex slavery. (Holden's job was to keep the girls distracted while the sting honchos were paying – and secretly filming — the trafficker.)

President Barack Obama casts a ballot in early voting for the 2014 midterm elections at the Dr. Martin Luther King Community Service Center in Chicago on Monday.

'Mr. President, Don't Touch My Girlfriend,' Chicago Voter Teases Obama

Things got heated at the Chicago polling place where President Obama cast an early ballot on Monday.

Obama was in his little booth, next to a young woman, when her boyfriend, whom CNN identified as Mike Jones, quips: "Mr. President, don't touch my girlfriend."

Obama held his own, replying, "I wasn't really planning on it."

CNN called it a "presidential love triangle." But, of course, the whole episode was just jest and it's certainly worth watching:

Jeffrey Fowle, an American who had been detained in North Korea, spoke to The Associated Press last month in Pyongyang. Fowle was released by North Korean authorities and flown back to the U.S. on Tuesday.

American Freed After Months Of Detention In North Korea

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Fowle, one of three Americans held by North Korea, has been released, the White House says.

Fowle, 56, who was detained in June, allegedly for leaving a Bible in his hotel room in North Korea, was home today after negotiators secured his release.

A yarmulke produced from a 3-D printer.

The Yarmulke Comes To 3-D Printing

What do you get when you combine a computer science background with Judaica? A 3-D printed kippah.

Craig Kaplan, an associate professor in the Computer Graphics Lab at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, rarely leaves the house without his Panama hat in warmer weather.

He wanted to design a 3-D printed version of the traditional hat, but he decided to start with an easier shape to reproduce: a yarmulke, or kippah — a plate-shaped head covering worn by observant Jews.

Did worries about financial stability get more men to say no to fatherhood?

When The Economy Goes Down, Vasectomies Go Up

The number of men getting vasectomies spiked during the Great Recession, rising one-third from 2006 to 2010, a study finds.

In 2006, 3.9 percent of men said they had had a vasectomy; in 2010, 4.4 percent reported having the surgery. That means an additional 150,000 to 180,000 men per year had vasectomies in each year of the recession.

Thomas Nellon (left), 17, and his brother Johnson Nellon, 14, of Liberia smile at their mother in the arrivals area at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York earlier this month. The brothers received a health screening upon arrival. The U.S. says it will step up screening measures for arrivals from Ebola-affected West African countries.

DHS: Travelers From West Africa Limited To 5 U.S. Airports

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

The Department of Homeland Security has announced that all passengers arriving from Ebola-affected countries in West Africa must go by way of a handful of U.S. airports as part of measures to control the spread of Ebola.

Adi Asulin stands in the kitchen of her family's remodeled apartment north of Tel Aviv. She saved thousands of dollars by flying to China to buy furnishings and flooring directly from manufacturers.

Israeli Homes, Decorated With A Shopping Spree In China

Adi Asulin lives in a fabulous apartment on the top floor of a seven-story building in the Israeli town of Ra'anana, north of Tel Aviv. The entry hall is long and light. Windows open onto an enormous balcony, which wraps around three sides of her home. The decor is fresh and white.

"It's all made in China," Asulin says.

Not just made in China. Nearly everything — the floors, the lighting, the furniture — she bought in China on a 10-day shopping spree.

The day after Asulin and her husband got keys to the place, she got on a plane to Guangzhou, in southern China.

Joe Ambrose of Favourite Ice holds one of his crystal-clear artisanal cubes.

Can Hand-Cut, Artisanal Ice Make Your Cocktail That Much Better?

Now that we've entered the "craft cocktail" era, drinks with double-digit price tags are just par for the course. And in many cities, there's a decent chance that your fancy craft drink now comes with a large, crystal-clear cube or rectangle that melts unhurriedly in your glass. That's right: Artisanal ice is a thing.

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