National News

Russia Reportedly Suspected In Hack Of White House Network

The White House says it has taken steps to address "suspicious activity" detected on the unclassified Executive Office of the President computer network in recent weeks — a breach that The Washington Post says may be the work of hackers hired by the Kremlin.

North Korean Officials Reportedly Executed For Watching Soap Operas

At least 10 North Korean officials have reportedly been put to death recently for the crime of watching South Korean soap operas.

The latest public executions reportedly bring to at least 50 the number of people put to death by the hard-line regime for taking in the unauthorized day-time dramas from south of the DMZ, The Independent reports, quoting South Korean sources familiar with a National Intelligence Service (NIS) briefing.

Getting stronger before surgery has been shown to help cancer patients do better long term.

Patients Do Better After Surgery If They Do 'Prehab' First

People are often told to follow a rehabilitation program following surgery to speed recovery. But starting weeks before going under the knife might help them regain function even faster.

An explosion following an airstrike is seen in the Syrian town of Kobani from near the Mursitpinar border crossing in the southeastern town of Suruc, in Turkey's Sanliurfa province, on Wednesday.

Kurdish Fighters Begin Using Turkish Crossing To Reach Kobani

For the first time, a small group of Syrian rebels have been permitted to transit Turkish territory en route to the fight against militants of the self-declared Islamic State in the besieged border city of Kobani.

The Associated Press reports, citing Syrian activists and Kurdish officials, that the group of around 50 armed men are from the Free Syrian Army. It was reported earlier that Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga fighters were also being allowed to cross from Turkey.

Zambia's then-opposition leader Michael Sata speaks to journalists during a news conference in Lusaka in 2006. Sata, who became president in 2011, died while being treated for an undisclosed illness in London.

Zambian President Dies While Being Treated Abroad

Zambia's President Michael Sata has died in London while being treated for an undisclosed illness, the government says.

"As you are aware, the president was receiving medical attention in London," Ronald Msiska told state television on Wednesday.

"The head of state passed on Oct. 28. President Sata's demise is deeply regretted. The nation will be kept informed on burial arrangements," he said. "I urge all of you to remain calm, united and peaceful during this very difficult period."

Storyful is making a business out of verifying material on social media for journalists and news organizations.

Behind The Scenes, Storyful Exposes Viral Hoaxes For News Outlets

At most news organizations, journalists celebrate when they get a story in print, on air or online.

At Storyful, editors high-five when they knock a story down.

"We like to think about [Storyful] as the first social news agency," said Mark Little, the company's buoyant CEO. A former television news anchor and correspondent in his native Ireland, Little conceived the company in 2009 after watching the documentation of mounting protests in Iran posted to Flickr and YouTube.

Ebola patient Amber Vinson arrived by ambulance at Emory University Hospital on Oct. 15. Now healthy, Vinson was discharged from the hospital Tuesday.

Emory Hospital Shares Lessons Learned On Ebola Care

Atlanta's Emory University Hospital got the first call at the end of July. An American doctor who'd been treating Ebola patients in Liberia was now terribly sick with the virus himself. In just 72 hours, Dr. Kent Brantly would be coming through Emory's doors.

In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, a former Red Cross official says, as many as 40 percent of the organization's emergency vehicles were assigned for public relations purposes. This photo, which shows one of the trucks in Long Island, N.Y., in January 2013, is one example of the many publicity photos taken by the Red Cross.

On Superstorm Sandy Anniversary, Red Cross Under Scrutiny

Within hours of Superstorm Sandy slamming the East Coast two years ago, Americans opened their wallets to help — donating millions to the first charity that came to mind: the American Red Cross.

President Obama, like most elected officials and celebrities, vouched for the organization, encouraging people to give.

50 Great Teachers: Socrates, The Ancient World's Teaching Superstar

Today, NPR Ed kicks off a yearlong series: 50 Great Teachers.

We're starting this celebration of teaching with Socrates, the superstar teacher of the ancient world. He was sentenced to death more than 2,400 years ago for "impiety" and "corrupting" the minds of the youth of Athens.

But Socrates' ideas helped form the foundation of Western philosophy and the scientific method of inquiry. And his question-and-dialogue-based teaching style lives on in many classrooms as the Socratic method.

Can Authorities Cut Off Utilities And Pose As Repairmen To Search A Home?

Some legal cases do more than raise eyebrows — they push the legal envelope to change the law. Such is a federal case in Las Vegas now working its way through the courts. The question is whether federal agents can disrupt service to a house and then, masquerading as helpful technicians, gain entry to covertly search the premises in hopes of finding evidence that might later justify a search warrant.

The defendants in this case are not your everyday Americans. They are, in fact, Chinese gamblers who were staying in Las Vegas at Caesar's Palace earlier this year.

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