National News

California has become the first U.S. state to define when "yes means yes" in sexual assault cases on college campuses, after a bill sponsored by State Sen. Kevin de Leon was signed into law Sunday.

California Enacts 'Yes Means Yes' Law, Defining Sexual Consent

Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a bill into law that makes California the first in the nation to have a clear definition of when people agree to sex. The law goes further than the common "no means no" standard, which has been blamed for bringing ambiguity into investigations of sexual assault cases.

The rendering industry likes to call itself the world's oldest recycling system. Nearly 100 percent of processed pigs will eventually get used — as meat and in uses as varied as medicine and pet food.

Everything But The Squeal: How The Hog Industry Cuts Food Waste

A tour of a pork processing plant takes a hard hat, waterproof boots and a strong stomach.

Oh, and hairnets.

Americans eat just half of the meat produced by farm animals. So what happens to the rest of the animal? I arrive at the Farmland Food plant in Milan, a factory in northeast Missouri, for a tour.

Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai (second from left) stands next to Afghanistan's Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah (left) and two deputy officials as he takes the oath during the inauguration ceremony at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Monday.

Afghanistan's New President: 'Hold Me Accountable'

"Hold me accountable" is the message from Afghanistan's new president, Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai, who took the oath of office today, succeeding Hamid Karzai, a leader many accused of lacking accountability.

Ahmadzai's accession to leadership in Afghanistan follows a protracted dispute with his rival in the presidential vote, former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah, who accused his opponent of vote fraud but later agreed to a power-sharing arrangement.

Should You Do The Do-Over If There's A Chance For A Second Chance?

It's not often that people get a second chance and in fact, for many people, there is no such thing as a second chance.

In a 2011 post for PsychologyToday.com, Alex Lickerman, author, general internist and former director of primary care and current assistant vice president for Student Health and Counseling Services at the University of Chicago, wrote this about second chances and regret:

Protesters take pictures with their mobile phones on Monday as they block the main street to the financial Central district, outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong.

What's At Stake For Hong Kong?

Masses of pro-democracy protesters continue to pack the streets in Hong Kong, defying police who have responded with tear gas. The demonstrators are angry that Beijing has insisted on vetting all candidates for the territory's next chief executive.

Here's a closer look at the issue and what's at stake:

A Brief History Of Hong Kong

A Sea Lynx helicopter is pictured on a frigate in Eckernfoerde, Germany, in 2010.

Germany Red-Faced Over Military Equipment Failures

Germany's defense minister warns that her country currently can't meet its long-term NATO commitments because of a widespread grounding of German military planes and helicopters.

"At the moment, we are below the target numbers announced a year ago on airborne systems we would want to make available to NATO within 180 days in cases of emergency," Ursula von der Leyen told the German newspaper Bild am Sonntag over the weekend. "The reason is the delays in getting replacement parts" for planes and a recent grounding of German navy helicopters.

A photo taken from a Kyodo News helicopter shows Japan's Self-Defense Forces personnel rescuing climbers who were in critical condition near the top of Mt. Ontake Monday, before rescue operations were suspended.

Japan's Mt. Ontake Is Still Erupting As Questions Emerge About Warnings

The volcano whose eruption surprised hikers in central Japan this weekend sent a plume of ash and gas more than 1,500 feet into the air Monday as it continued to erupt, officials say. That has complicated efforts to find victims and survivors, and rescue efforts have again been halted.

Protesters march as they block the main street to the financial Central district, outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong, on Monday. Protesters at times numbering in the tens of thousands have gathered to demand the right to choose the territory's next leaders.

Hong Kong Tense As Democracy Activists Face Down Police

Thousands of pro-democracy protesters, wearing surgical masks and holding umbrellas to ward off tear gas lobbed by police, have continued to throng Hong Kong's Central business district and other areas of the city, calling on Beijing to make good on a promise to allow the former British colony to choose its next leader.

Organized mainly by a group calling itself "Occupy Central," the mass protest and the police pushback is being described as the worst unrest in the southern Chinese business hub since it was handed back to China in 1997.

Then-incumbent Rep. Frank Guinta, R-N.H., and then-Democratic challenger Carol Shea-Porter debate during a Sept. 2012 forum at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. Guinta, who lost to Shea-Porter in 2012, is running for his old seat in 2014.

In N.H. Race, A Rematch Of A Rematch

Think of it as a rematch of a rematch.

In New Hampshire, Democratic Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter is battling Republican Frank Guinta for the third time in a row. Each has beaten the other before – Guinta defeated Shea-Porter during the 2010 Tea Party wave, and Shea-Porter won her seat back in 2012.

You wonder if it starts to get boring when you're hitting the same rival over and over again.

"Well, I know what he's going to say, that's for sure," says Shea-Porter.
Guinta admits the same: "I mean, it is kind of old hat."

Archaeologists inspect a female figurine inside a recently discovered, fourth-century B.C. tomb, in the town of Amphipolis, northern Greece on Sept. 7. The occupant of the tomb is unknown, but there's speculation that it could be someone who was closely linked to Alexander the Great.

Who's Buried In The 'Magnificent' Tomb From Ancient Greece?

Early last month, on a hill outside a tiny, windy village of almond and tobacco farmers in northeastern Greece, veteran archaeologist Katerina Peristeri announced that she and her team had discovered what is believed to be the biggest tomb in Greece.

The "massive, magnificent tomb," Peristeri told reporters, is likely connected to the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia, which, in the fourth century B.C. produced Alexander the Great.

Pages