National News

Fireworks explode behind a skiing sculpture to celebrate Beijing being chosen to host the 2022 Winter Olympics last week.

Did Beijing's Olympics Song Lift Parts Of 'Let It Go'?

It starts with the opening bars of "The Snow and Ice Dance," the song's critics say, then it builds: an eerie sense that the song — an official melody of the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing — is a knockoff of the Disney hit "Let It Go," from the movie Frozen.

Or maybe it's not so eerie. Discussing the two songs' similarities online, some commenters say the idea that a Chinese song would cross the line between inspiration and imitation fits with the country's reputation for plagiarism and copyright infringement.

If you were a tsetse fly, you would be irresistibly attracted to these blue flags.

In The Fight Against Tsetse Flies, Blue Is The New Black

Walk along one of the many streams and rivers in the West Nile region of Uganda, and you'll notice something funny. All along the riverbanks, you'll see small pieces of blue cloth, attached to wooden stakes in the ground. There's one every 50 yards or so.

No, this isn't some half-baked public art project. These dinky contraptions are actually flytraps, designed to lure and kill tsetse flies, whose bites transmit a parasitic disease called sleeping sickness, which, like rabies, drives victims mad before it kills them.

Officials are investigating the cause of a tent collapse that killed two people and injured more than a dozen others.

Circus Tent Collapse Kills 2 During Storm In New Hampshire

A man and a girl were killed while watching a traveling circus show Monday evening, after a strong storm dislodged the circus tent's poles and caused a collapse. Officials are now working to find out more about what went wrong at the fairgrounds in Lancaster, N.H.

"We lost two lives — a father and a daughter — at an event that was supposed to be fun," Gov. Maggie Hassan told local TV station WMUR.

Joseph Straus, 6, rides a zip line at the Berkeley Adventure Playground, where kids can "play wild" in a half-acre park that has a junkyard feel.

Play Hard, Live Free: Where Wild Play Still Rules

Braden Swenson wanders into a semi-rickety wooden shed on his search for gold, treasure and riches.

"Is there any treasure in here?" he asks in the endearing dialect of a 4-year-old. "I've been looking everywhere for them. I can't find any." The proto-pirate toddler conducts a quick search, then wanders away to continue his quest elsewhere.

Not far away, Ethan Lipsie, age 9, clutches a framing hammer and a nine-penny nail. He's ready to hang his freshly painted sign on a wooden "fort" he's been hammering away on. It says, "Ethan, Hudson and William were here."

So You Flunked A Racism Test. Now What?

You're probably at least a little bit racist and sexist and homophobic. Most of us are.

Before you get all indignant, try taking one of the popular implicit-association tests. Created by sociologists at Harvard, the University of Washington, and the University of Virginia, they measure people's unconscious prejudice by testing how easy — or difficult — it is for the test-takers to associate words like "good" and "bad" with images of black people versus white people, or "scientist" and "lab" with men versus women.

A boy paddles a makeshift raft in flooded Kalay township, in the Sagaing region of Myanmar. Heavy monsoon rains have affected more than 210,000 people in 12 out of Myanmar's 14 states and regions since June.

Monsoon Flooding Kills Dozens In Myanmar, Prompting Calls For Help

At least 46 deaths have been blamed on flooding and landslides in Myanmar, where monsoon rains have forced disaster declarations in four regions. More than 1 million acres of farmland have been flooded, the government says.

Myanmar, also known as Burma, is appealing for international aid to help it cope with the flooding. Officials also say that because water has blocked travel between some areas, they don't yet know the full extent of the crisis.

The Willy Brandt Berlin Brandenburg International Airport was supposed to open in 2012, but has been delayed repeatedly and is now set to open in 2017. The cost overruns and delays have made airport the butt of frequent jokes.

Berlin's New Airport: Still In A Holding Pattern

Germany may be Europe's economic giant, but Berlin remains the lone major European capital without a proper airport. The mismanaged, roughly $6-billion project to build one became a national laughing stock that has dragged on for years.

Ground was broken on the airport in 2006 and the opening was delayed just shortly before the planned date in 2012. The airport's managers are now pledging that Germany's third-largest airport will open on the outskirts of Berlin before the end of 2017.

Daniel Harmon, a veteran of the wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq, looks out the window of his room at the Hollywood Veterans Center in Los Angeles. The facility provides housing to homeless vets.

The U.S. Declared War On Veteran Homelessness — And It Actually Could Win

This is a tale of two cities. In New Orleans, there are signs of hope that veteran homelessness can be solved. But Los Angeles presents a very different picture.

Under the deafening highway noise of the Pontchartrain Expressway in central city New Orleans, Ronald Engberson, 54, beds down for the night. Engberson got out of the Marines in 1979, plagued even back then by problems with drugs and alcohol. He says that's mostly the reason he's been homeless the past 10 years.

Yaupon growing in the wild in east Texas. This evergreen holly was once valuable to Native American tribes in the southeastern U.S., which made a brew from its caffeinated leaves.

Here's The Buzz On America's Forgotten Native 'Tea' Plant

During a severe drought in 2011, JennaDee Detro noticed that many trees on the family cattle ranch in Cat Spring, Texas, withered, but a certain evergreen holly appeared vigorous. It's called a yaupon.

"The best we can tell is that they enjoy suffering," Detro says with a laugh. "So this kind of extreme weather in Texas — and the extreme soil conditions — are perfect for the yaupon."

Detro began researching yaupon — a tree abundant in its native range, from coastal North Carolina to East Texas — and discovered that the plant contains caffeine and has a remarkable history.

A coal scraper machine works on a pile of coal at American Electric Power's Mountaineer coal power plant in 2009 in  New Haven, W. Va. The state, in which coal mining is a major industry, is one party planning to sue the Environmental Protection Agency regarding new power plant regulations announced on Monday.

New Power Plant Rules Likely To Start Slow-Burning Debate, Legal Action

An epic legal battle is about to begin over President Obama's plan to address climate change, in which the Environmental Protection Agency is putting in place new limits on greenhouse gases from power plants. Critics argue the plan is on shaky legal ground, but the administration says it's prepared to defend the regulations in court.

In announcing the "Clean Power Plan" on Monday, Obama predicted some of the arguments his critics would make.

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