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A still from the surveillance camera footage shows the fainting man (top left and bottom right) lying alone in a subway car, as the few remaining occupants hurry away.

Why Did Crowd Flee Shanghai Subway After Foreigner Fainted?

One Saturday night this summer, a foreigner fainted and fell to the floor of a Shanghai subway car.

The passengers around him scattered. Not a single person tried to help.

When the train arrived at the next station, hundreds rushed out, nearly trampling each other.

The incident was captured on closed-circuit cameras. Tens of millions in China have now seen the images, which have rekindled a long-running debate among Chinese about their national character as well as trust and fear in modern society.

Librarians Are A Luxury Chicago Public Schools Can't Afford

Two years ago, the Chicago Public Schools budgeted for 454 librarians. Last year, the budget called for 313 librarians, and now that number is down to 254.

With educators facing tough financial choices, having a full-time librarian is becoming something of a luxury in Chicago's more than 600 public schools.

It's not that there's a shortage of librarians in Chicago, and it's not mass layoffs — it's that the librarians are being reassigned.

Nancy Becker, an Amazon employee in Bad Hersfeld, Germany, speaks at a protest rally outside the company's headquarters in Seattle in December.

Amazon's German Workers Push For Higher Wages, Union Contract

Only about 11 percent of U.S. workers are in unions — down from 20 percent just three decades ago. It's different in Germany, where most workers are covered by collective bargaining.

That cultural difference is causing a clash between Amazon, the Seattle-based online retail giant, and its German workers.

Bad Hersfeld is best known as a picturesque festival and spa town in central Germany. But it's also home to two Amazon fulfillment centers that employ more than 3,000 people.

Our Use Of Little Words Can, Uh, Reveal Hidden Interests

One Friday night, 30 men and 30 women gathered at a hotel restaurant in Washington, D.C. Their goal was love, or maybe sex, or maybe some combination of the two. They were there for speed dating.

The women sat at separate numbered tables while the men moved down the line, and for two solid hours they did a rotation, making small talk with people they did not know, one after another, in three-minute increments.

Kwei Quartey sets one of the crime scenes in his second D.I. Dawson book in Agbogbloshie, an Accra slum.

Ghanaian Mystery Writer Says, 'It's Easy To Get Murdered In Accra'

White egrets swoop down on the Agbogbloshie Canal and stoop to pick at mounds of filth and trash in search of food. The clogged and stinky waterway dominates Agbogbloshie, the main shantytown in Accra, Ghana's capital city. You wonder how the birds manage to maintain white feathers as they wade in the putrid, muddy water.

The Ricketts family poses on the Chicago Cubs field in 2010, a year after they bought the team. From left, Laura Ricketts, Joe Ricketts, Marlene Ricketts, Todd Ricketts, Tom Ricketts and Pete Ricketts.

A Political Family, Funding And Running On Both Sides Of The Aisle

Rich families sustain American politics. Some produce candidates; others supply money. And in rare instances, a family will do both.

Meet Nebraska billionaire Joe Ricketts, founder of Ending Spending, an independent political organization that's among the top 10 spenders this election cycle. Three of his four children are politically active, including one who's running for governor.

A Billionaire With Political Punch

Third-year medical student Allie Tetreault, left, talks with Gabrielle Nuki, 16, at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine. Gabrielle helps med students practice patient care.

Pretending To Be A Medical Patient Pays Off For This Teen

Some of us are lucky enough to stumble into a job that we love. That was the case for Gabrielle Nuki. The 16-year-old had never heard of standardized patients until her advisor at school told her she should check it out.

"I was kind of shocked, and I was kind of like, 'Oh, is there actually something like this in the world?' "

PTSD Goes Largely Untreated In Iraq's Kurdish Region

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Jason Wright, seen here during his 15-month deployment to Iraq, served in the military for nine years before resigning last week.

Guantanamo Defense Lawyer Resigns, Says U.S. Case Is 'Stacked'

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-proclaimed mastermind behind the Sept. 11 attacks, is facing a military commission at Guantanamo Bay and potentially the death penalty. He was captured in 2003 but his case still hasn't gone to trial.

Last week, Maj. Jason Wright — one of the lawyers defending Mohammed — resigned from the Army. He has accused the U.S. government of "abhorrent leadership" on human rights and due process guarantees and says it is crafting a "show trial."

A Cirrus SR22 similar to this one ran out of fuel and crashed into the Atlantic after its pilot apparently fell unconscious.

Coast Guard Calls Off Search For Small Plane That Crashed In Ocean

The Coast Guard says it has called off a search for the pilot of a single-engine prop plane that drifted into restricted airspace over Washington, D.C., forcing fighter jets to scramble an intercept. The apparently unconscious pilot of the small aircraft later ran out of fuel and plunged into the Atlantic Ocean.

On Saturday, a pair of F-16s were dispatched to escort the Cirrus SR22. When the fighters approached, one of the F-16 pilots observed a person at the controls of the propeller-driven plane who appeared to be unconscious.

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