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Powwow Sweat

'Powwow Sweat' Promotes Fitness Through Traditional Dance

In Indian Country, a gym membership is not a cultural norm and the incidence of heart disease and obesity are high. Native Americans are 60 percent more likely to be obese than non-Hispanic whites. The Coeur D'Alene tribe, whose headquarters is in northern Idaho, is trying to combat the problem by incorporating culture into fitness programs.

There are signs that fewer immigrants in the U.S. illegally are filing taxes than in previous years.

Tax Filings Seen Dipping Amid Trump Crackdown On Illegal Immigration

Millions of taxpayers are rushing to complete their federal and state filings before the April 18 deadline. Among them are several million people in this country illegally, and there are signs that fewer such immigrants are filing than in years past.

Mollie Burkhart (second from right) lost all three of her sisters under suspicious circumstances. Rita Smith (left) died in an explosion, Anna Brown (second from left) was shot in the head and Minnie Smith (right) died of what doctors referred to as a "peculiar wasting illness."

In The 1920s, A Community Conspired To Kill Native Americans For Their Oil Money

Generations ago, the American Indian Osage tribe was forced to move. Not for the first time, white settlers pushed them off their land in the 1800s. They ended up in a rocky, infertile area in northeast Oklahoma in hopes that settlers would finally leave them alone.

As it turned out, the land they had chosen was rich in oil, and in the early 20th century members of the tribe became spectacularly wealthy. They bought cars and built mansions; they made so much oil money that the government began appointing white guardians to "help" them spend it.

Gail Dougherty, 61, was a project manager at Intel until she retired in 2016. Now she is working part time at a health center, part of a fellowship paid by Intel as a regular retirement benefit.

At Intel, A Retirement Perk That Can Kick Off A New Career As A Paid Fellow

Not everyone who reaches so-called retirement age is ready to retire. But they may be ready for a change. That's one of the reasons that the tech giant Intel pays longtime employees a stipend while they try out new careers at nonprofit organizations.

Bidwell Marina at Lake Oroville in April in Oroville, Calif. After record rainfall and snow in the mountains, much of California's landscape has turned from brown to green and reservoirs across the state are near capacity.

From Moonscape To Lush: Photographs Capture California Drought's Story

In California, an extremely wet winter put an end to the state's record-breaking drought. Heavy rainfall also produced welcome spring scenes — like replenished reservoirs and fields in bloom.

"It's a completely different look," says Justin Sullivan, a Getty Images photographer who took before-and-after style photos of drought-stricken areas. "It's just like a velvety green, lush landscape now — compared to just dry, brown, almost like a moonscape before."

Former President Barack Obama enjoyed some of Torchy's Tacos on one of his trips to Austin, Texas.

NPR News Nuggets: How Meta Can We Get? The Nugget About Nuggets

Here's a quick roundup of some of the mini-moments you may have missed on this week's Morning Edition.

Taco trademark wars

Cleveland Police Search For Suspect Who Posted Homicide Video On Facebook

A manhunt is under way for a suspect whom Cleveland police say filmed his fatal shooting of an elderly man, in a video that he posted to Facebook.

In a later video, also posted to Facebook on Sunday afternoon, Steve Stephens, the accused shooter, says he has killed more than a dozen other people. Police have not verified that claim.

Cleveland police have identified the homicide victim from the video as 74-year-old Robert Godwin Sr.

Climate Change In Louisiana Changes Diets Of Native Americans

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Slaughter Of Yellowstone Bison At The Center Of Culture War

Copyright 2017 Wyoming Public Radio Network. To see more, visit Wyoming Public Radio Network.

Short Hiatus In War Gives Ukrainians In Donetsk A Chance To Celebrate Easter

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