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Saudi Arabia's army fires artillery shells toward Houthi rebels along the Saudi border with Yemen on April 15. Outside Saudi Arabia, many are critical of the military  campaign and question whether it will succeed, but it is popular inside the kingdom.

Saudi Airstrikes Raise Doubts Abroad, Spark Patriotic Fervor At Home

Saudi airstrikes in Yemen began almost a month ago, targeting rebels who have taken over much of the country.

Internationally, there are concerns about increasing casualties and questions about the strategy in the Saudi operation, which is receiving help from the U.S., among others.

But at home in the kingdom, the war has sparked a patriotic fervor that's noticeable just about everywhere you turn.

Phyllis Omido is one of six winners of the 2015 Goldman Environmental prizes.

You Don't Want To Mess With An Angry Mother

In the gritty Kenyan port city of Mombasa, Phyllis Omido knew that industry could pose a danger to the surrounding communities. She'd worked on environmental impact assessment reports for several factories.

But when her 2½-year-old son, King David, got sick with a mysterious condition, it didn't occur to her that it might be from environmental toxins. He had a high fever that wasn't responding to medication. He couldn't sleep. He was plagued with diarrhea, and his eyes became runny. He spent two weeks in the hospital, and still no one could figure out what was wrong.

Blue crabs brought back to Tony Goutierrez's dock in Hopedale, La. For the past few years, his traps have been coming up empty. "It's sad to see it go, but it's going — this way of life is going to disappear," he says.

Appetite For Gulf Seafood Is Back, But The Crabs And Oysters Aren't

In 2010, just after the BP oil well in the Gulf of Mexico exploded, seafood restaurants were bombarded with questions from concerned diners: "How bad is the spill?" "Is this from the Gulf?" "Is it safe?" Demand for Gulf seafood tanked.

"You have to remember, that was literally weeks and months on end when you could turn on the TV at any time of day and see an oil well leaking unabatedly into the Gulf of Mexico," says Brett Anderson, feature food writer for Nola.com.

'Post And Courier' Of Charleston, S.C., Wins Pulitzer For Public Service

Updated at 3:21 p.m. ET

The Post and Courier of Charleston, S.C., has been awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize award for public service for Till Death Do Us Part, a series the award's panel said "probed why South Carolina is among the deadliest states in the union for women and put the issue of what to do about it on the state's agenda."

Reptiles like leopard geckos can bring <em>Salmonella</em> along with them.

Doctors Don't Always Ask About Pet-Related Health Risks

If you're being treated for cancer, an iguana might not be the pet for you.

Ditto if you're pregnant, elderly or have small children at home.

Pets can transmit dozens of diseases to humans, but doctors aren't always as good as they should be in asking about pets in the home and humans' health issues, a study finds.

A shipwreck is seen near the coast in Lake Michigan, where clear waters recently allowed a Coast Guard helicopter to take striking aerial photos of several wreck sites.

Shipwrecks Ahoy: Coast Guard Shares Pics From Crystal-Clear Lake Michigan

The water is exceptionally clear in Lake Michigan right now, and a Coast Guard helicopter crew used a recent routine patrol to capture striking images of some of the area's many notable sunken ships. Some of them date from the 1800s.

Photos from the flight out of the Coast Guard's Traverse City, Mich., air station show a variety of ships resting on the lake bottom, including the James McBride, a 121-foot brig that sank in 1857.

Twitter changed its direct messaging guidelines Monday. Now, any user can direct-message any other user even if they are not following each other. The new feature is not automatically enabled; users will have to opt in.

Twitter Now Allows Users To Receive Direct Messages From Any User

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET: Twitter responds to harassment questions

"Communicating with people you may or may not know in real life just got easier," says Twitter Senior Software Engineer Nhu Vuong in a blog post announcing a change to Twitter's direct messaging system. The new feature gives users the ability to receive messages whether the user follows them or not. Vuong used an example of an ice cream shop and a fan to show what's changed:

George Takei And Company To Hollywood Gatekeepers: Fix Your Diversity Problem

Remember that Deadline article from a few weeks back? In which the writer pointed out that Hollywood is diversifying — and claimed that's a bad thing?

At least one good thing may come of it:

Jason Rezaian, an Iranian-American correspondent for the <em>Washington Post, </em>faces four serious charges, including espionage, according to his lawyer. He's shown in 2013.

Iran Charges 'Washington Post' Reporter With Espionage

Iran is charging a Washington Post reporter with four crimes, including espionage, the newspaper said today. This is the first time the precise charges against Jason Rezaian, the Post's bureau chief in Tehran, have been made public since he was detained by the Iranian authorities nine months ago.

They don't call him Mr. Toilet for nothing! On a cold and windy November day, Jack Sim visited NPR and gladly struck a pose on his favorite appliance. Note: This toilet was not hooked up.

Mr. Toilet And Mr. Condom Think Jokes Will Save The World

A funny thing happened at the 12th Skoll World Forum on Social Entrepreneurship last week in Oxford, England.

At this global gathering of activists and change makers, where conversation often centered on poverty, disease and disaster, there was a session called What's So Funny? The Role of Comedy in Social Change.

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