National News

President Obama delivers a prime time address from the Cross Hall of the White House on Wednesday. He pledged to lead a broad coalition against the Islamic State insurgents and vowed to target the terrorist group with airstrikes "wherever they exist."

Opinion Pages Offer Support On Plan To Combat Islamic State

President Obama's prime-time speech outlining his plan to broaden a U.S.-led offensive against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, prompted generally cautious support from the editorial pages of major newspapers across the country this morning.

As we reported last night, Obama told the nation: "Our objective is clear: we will degrade, and ultimately destroy, ISIL through a comprehensive and sustained counter-terrorism strategy."

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the Apple Watch on Tuesday in Cupertino, Calif. The long-awaited smart watch comes in two sizes and requires an iPhone.

Is Amazon's Failed Phone A Cautionary Tale?

It's been a big week in the world of gadgets. Apple announced its newest iPhones, the 6 and 6 Plus, and they're bigger than any other before. And on the smaller side, there's an Apple Watch — that does a lot of the same things. Meanwhile, Amazon took a nosedive with its foray into the smartphone marketplace. Here are some questions we had:

Amazon slashed the price of the Fire phone from $199 To 99 cents. Why?

Not every business has been hurt by the Ebola epidemic: Stephen Kollie says his newspaper stand is thriving because people are hungry for the latest Ebola information. But many of his usual expatriate customers have left the country, he says.

Fast-Moving Ebola Slows Down Liberia's Economy

Postwar Liberia had struggled back onto its feet in the past decade, after the civil war, and was just catching its collective breath when Ebola landed. One of the lasting effects of Ebola on the country is likely to be its impact on the economy.

Child Migrants Settle Uneasily In The Big Easy

Last June, 13-year-old Yashua Cantillano and his 11-year-old brother, Alinhoel, left their uncle's home in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, with a change of clothes in plastic bags, some snacks, water and their mother's phone number scribbled on a piece of paper.

Their guide and protector? Seventeen-year-old Sulmi Cantillano, their step-sister.

With the help of a smuggler, or coyote, Sulmi says, they got to the Mexican border city of Reynosa about 11 miles south of McAllen, Texas. They crossed the Rio Grande and turned themselves in to the U.S. Border Patrol.

Handsome Zhang — that's his real name in Mandarin --€“ runs a shipping company, one of many supporting businesses spawned by East Wind village's furniture industry. The shipping business helped Zhang, 25, buy this Kia sports car.

The Alibaba Effect: How China's eBay Transformed Village Economics

The Chinese e-commerce behemoth, Alibaba, is poised this week for what could be one of the biggest IPOs in Wall Street history. One reason Alibaba has been so dominant in China is its business-to-consumer platform, Taobao, a sort of Chinese eBay.

Last year, Taobao and Alibaba's brand-name retail site, Tmall, drove nearly a quarter of a billion dollars in transactions.

Along the way, Taobao has even transformed village economies.

President Barack Obama addresses the nation from the Cross Hall in the White House Wednesday. Opening a new military front in the Middle East, Obama authorized U.S. airstrikes inside Syria for the first time, along with expanded strikes in Iraq as part of a broad mission to root out the violent Islamic State militants whose reign of terror has spread across both countries.

As Visible Villain, ISIS Alters U.S. Political Calculus

After a decade in national politics as a dove, Barack Obama has become a reluctant hawk.

Obama's long transformation reached its endpoint on the eve of the 13th anniversary of the September 11 attacks. But it came, in the end, because Americans suddenly felt a renewed sense of peril from a terrorist enemy – and a renewed willingness to fight. Both the fear and the resolve were manifest in a flurry of fresh polls showing overwhelming support for new military commitments in Iraq and neighboring Syria.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell

NFL: Ex-FBI Chief Will Investigate How League Handled Rice Evidence

Update, 11 p.m.:

The NFL is bringing in former FBI Director Robert Mueller to investigate how the league handled evidence in the Ray Rice case, a reporter for the league's website said Wednesday night.

The original story continues below:

The National Football League is denying a report that it received a video from police that shows former Baltimore Ravens star Ray Rice punching his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer.

In this image made through a window of the Oval Office, President Obama speaks on the phone to Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah on Wednesday.

Obama Says U.S. Will 'Take Out' Islamic State 'Wherever They Exist'

In a prime-time speech on Wednesday, President Obama said the United States plans to "take out" the Islamic State "wherever they exist."

"With a new Iraqi government in place, and following consultations with allies abroad and Congress at home, I can announce that America will lead a broad coalition to roll back this terrorist threat," Obama said. "Our objective is clear: we will degrade, and ultimately destroy, ISIL through a comprehensive and sustained counter-terrorism strategy."

Neonta Williams (left) shares family letters dating back to 1901 with preservationist Kimberly Peach during the Smithsonian's Save our African American Treasures program at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. Peach advises her to use archive-quality polyester sleeves to protect the fragile papers, rather than store them in a zip-lock bag.

To Preserve Black History, Americans Keep National Treasures At Home

In a hall inside the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama on Saturday, long tables are draped with black linen. Experts are bent over tables, examining aging quilts, letters filled with tight, hand-penned script, and yellowing black-and-white photos tacked into crackling albums — all family keepsakes brought in by local residents.

Families carry their belongings while moving to higher ground in the Bardia region of Nepal during the flooding on Aug. 15.

Nepal Struggles To Help Villages Washed Away In Floods

In August, monsoon rains brought flooding and landslides to Nepal on a massive scale.

Three days of constant rains inundated valleys. And huge swaths of land came tumbling down mountainsides in the western part of the country.

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