National News

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry looks at his phone as he leaves a meeting in Vienna on Friday.

Kerry, Iranian Counterpart Meet Again In Nuclear Talks

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Iranian counterpart, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, added another meeting today in Vienna in the push toward an agreement on Iran's nuclear program.

Iranian news reports had earlier said Zarif was returning to Tehran for further instructions. And Kerry had been scheduled to leave Vienna for Paris – something he could still do while talks continue — before adding the late Friday meeting.

President Obama after discussing his executive actions on immigration Friday at Del Sol High School in Las Vegas. Business groups say the plan does little to help U.S. employers attract foreign workers.

Obama's Immigration Moves Do Little To Help Businesses, Groups Say

Business groups have long been active players in the nation's immigration debate. They represent employers who need to recruit workers, after all — employers who are sometimes investigated, even prosecuted, for hiring workers who are not approved to work in the U.S. legally.

Many big employers have been pushing for reforms that would allow them to keep more science and technology workers and skilled laborers in the country. But the executive action President Obama announced Thursday leaves out much of what the business lobby has been advocating for.

These 'True Tales' Add Nuance To The Immigration Discussion

We need more stories and books that treat Mexican immigrants as humans — novel idea, right? But far too often, the media and authors cast them as sinners or saints, with little deviation from cliches established decades ago.

That's why I recommend the writer Sam Quinones, and his two collections: True Tales from Another Mexico and Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream: True Tales of Mexican Migration.

Read them both, you'll see something rare: his migrant characters are brilliant, maddening, flawed and very human.

Joel Bowman, 66, rides his e-bike six miles daily to his job at Emory University in Atlanta.

Electric Bikes, On A Roll In Europe, Start To Climb In U.S.

For Joel Bowman, decades of bike commuting started feeling like hard work. So the 66-year-old Atlanta resident recently switched to an electric bicycle and now when he rides Bowman feels like the wind is at his back.

An e-bike looks a lot like a regular bike, but with an integrated electric motor, and it doesn't burn gasoline like an old-fashioned moped. As you pedal, an e-bike gives you a powered boost when you need it.

They are getting more popular in Europe, but in the United States, e-bikes still have to overcome the stigma of being just a toy for old people.

Women and children wait in the recovery area at the Hastings Ebola Treatment Center in Freetown, Sierra Leone. About 60 patients at the facility were almost ready to go home after recovering from Ebola.

An Ebola Clinic Figures Out A Way To Start Beating The Odds

One reason the Ebola virus is so terrifying is that it's so lethal. Researchers estimate that the strain circulating in West Africa is killing upward of 70 percent of those it infects. Even among those getting care, as many as 64 percent are dying.

In Britain, a new bus running between Bath and the Bristol airport uses biomethane for power. The gas is derived from human sewage and food waste.

Poo Power: New British Bus Runs On Human Waste

A bus in Britain is making headlines for running on gas – and we're not talking about petroleum or natural gas. The Bio-Bus runs on biomethane gas that's produced by human sewage and food waste.

The Bio-Bus has 40 seats and a range of around 186 miles on a full tank. When it officially goes into service next week, it'll run as a shuttle between the city of Bath and the Bristol airport, along with other routes.

Texas Education Panel OKs New History, Social Studies Textbooks

The Texas State Board of Education has voted to approve the use of 89 history and social studies books across the state.

The 10-5 vote in the Republican-controlled panel was along party lines. The Texas Tribune has more:

An anti-Obama protester yells on a megaphone Friday across the street from Del Sol High School in Las Vegas, where President Obama delivered remarks on his use of executive authority to relax U.S. immigration policy in Las Vegas.

In Southwest, New Immigration Policies Bring Frustration From All Sides

Even before the details of the president's executive action on immigration came down, William Gheen was hitting the phones, organizing demonstrations outside the Las Vegas high school Obama visited Friday.

"I don't know what's going to be effective, I don't think anybody ever expected that the president of the United States would side with an illegal immigrant invasion over American citizens' interest, but that's what's happened here," Gheen says.

Texas Hits The Books

In the education world, all eyes were on Texas Friday.

For the first time since 2002, the Texas State Board of Education voted to adopt a new generation of social studies products. That includes some 89 textbooks, workbooks and other classroom materials. The vote matters because, with about 5 million students, the state has a big impact on the national textbook market.

Last 'Angola 3' Inmate's Conviction Should Be Thrown Out, Court Says

A federal appeals court has ruled that a man who has spent about 40 years in solitary confinement in a Louisiana prison should have his conviction overturned.

Albert Woodfox, the only member of the so-called Angola 3 still incarcerated, was convicted of the 1972 murder of a young prison guard named Brent Miller. Woodfox was found guilty along with fellow inmate Herman Wallace.

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