National News

The U.S. and South Korea kicked off annual military exercises Monday, prompting threats of a nuclear strike from North Korea amid high tensions on the peninsula.

U.S.-South Korea War Games Begin Despite Threats From North Korea

The U.S. and South Korea began annual military drills today amid heightened inter-Korean tensions and threats of a nuclear strike from the North.

In a statement, U.S. and South Korean forces described the 12-day Ulchi Freedom Guardian war games as "non-provocative in nature" and designed to enhance "readiness, protect the region and maintain stability on the Korean peninsula."

Ryan Lochte competes in the men's 200-meter individual medley final at the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro on Aug. 11. A couple of days later, he reported he had been robbed at a local gas station — a story that turned out to be false. Now Speedo, one of his major sponsors, says it's dropping him.

Speedo Cancels Its Sponsorship Deal With Ryan Lochte

Saying it can't condone Ryan Lochte's behavior during Rio's Summer Olympics, swimwear company Speedo is ending its sponsorship deal with the decorated American swimmer.

The announcement comes after Lochte and three other swimmers were caught in an embarrassing episode in which Lochte claimed to have been robbed at gunpoint — a story that Rio de Janeiro police and U.S. officials found to be a fabrication.

Signs are posted outside Santee High School's gender neutral restrooms at its campus in Los Angeles on May 4.

U.S. Judge Grants Nationwide Injunction Blocking White House Transgender Policy

Months after the Obama administration advised school districts that transgender students should be given access to bathrooms based on their gender identity, a federal judge in Texas has blocked the guidance from going into effect — for now.

U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor has granted a preliminary, nationwide injunction in response to a lawsuit filed by Texas and a number of other states.

Bill Clinton Turned 70 Last Week. Here Are 5 Moments That Defined His Career

Bill Clinton turned 70 on Friday. From his small town beginnings in Arkansas to the Oval Office in Washington, Clinton's career has been anything but a smooth ride. It could be tested again if his wife, Hillary Clinton, is elected president — becoming the first presidential spouse to be elected president in their own right.

Nothing has represented Clinton's legacy more than the Clinton foundation, but questions about potential conflicts of interest — as well as Clinton's use of a private email server — have been a nagging thorn in the side of Clinton's presidential run.

Donald Trump campaigns in Michigan on Friday.

'To Be Determined': Trump Campaign Signals He May Moderate Immigration Stance

Is Donald Trump considering wavering on a key campaign promise?

That's what several news reports published over the weekend suggest. And while the Trump campaign issued a statement denying any shift on immigration policy, top surrogates and campaign operatives hinted that a change just might be on its way.

The issue: what to do with the estimated 11 million immigrants already living in the United States illegally.

People wait close to empty graves at a cemetery on Sunday, during the funeral for the victims of a suicide attack on a wedding party in Gaziantep, Turkey. At least 50 people were killed when a suspected suicide bomber linked to Islamic State jihadists attacked a wedding thronged with guests, officials say.

Suicide Bombing At Turkish Wedding Pinned On ISIS

A devastating suicide attack on a wedding in Turkey appears to have been orchestrated by the Islamic State, Turkish officials say.

The bombing in Gaziantep killed at least 54 people, according to local officials, and injured at least 66 more. Fourteen of the wounded are said to be critically injured.

At least 22 of the victims were children.

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla., in 2014.

Research On Tulsa's Head Start Program Finds Lasting Gains

In 1998 Oklahoma became one of only two states to offer universal preschool, and it's been one of the most closely watched experiments in the country.

Today, the vast majority of these programs are in public schools. The rest are run by child-care centers or Head Start, the federally funded early-childhood education program.

A Small Town Struggles With A Boom In Sober Living Homes

When Phillip decided to stop using heroin, he knew sticking around home was a recipe for failure.

"It's just, like, a heroin epidemic on Long Island where I'm from. So I had to get away from that and now I'm in Prescott, Ariz.," Phillip says. NPR agreed not to use his last name because he is struggling with addiction and fears it might hurt his chances of future employment.

In 2014, about 2,300 people in Seoul made 250 tons of kimchi, a traditional fermented South Korean pungent vegetable dish, to donate to neighbors in preparation for winter.

How South Korea Uses Kimchi To Connect To The World — And Beyond

Everybody eats, which is what makes food a perfect choice to resolve conflicts and foster connections among nations. The concept is called "gastrodiplomacy," and South Korea is one of its strongest champions.

The country is one of the world's best at branding itself through food, using its cuisine as a kind of "soft power" to help spread South Korea's influence. And even as the government supports its citizens in opening Korean restaurants around the world, it pays special attention to promoting that most ubiquitous of Korean foods: kimchi.

Amber Lakin (center) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space.

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

Twenty years ago, welfare as Americans knew it ended.

President Bill Clinton signed a welfare overhaul bill that limited benefits and encouraged poor people to find jobs.

"We're going to make it all new again, and see if we can't create a system of incentives which reinforce work and family and independence," Clinton said at a White House bill signing ceremony.

The goals were admirable: help poor families get into the workforce so they'd no longer need government aid. They'd get job training and support, such as help with child care.

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