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Post Paris Attacks, Syrian Migrants Wary Of Germany Refuge

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A Doctor Wrestles With Whether To Keep Wearing His White Coat

I remember being handed a white coat during my first year of medical school. It came crisply folded in a cellophane bag. I was told to wear it anytime we were in the hospital or with patients as a sign of respect.

There was no pomp about it. I took it home and tried it on. It was like putting on a costume and pretending to play doctor. The white coat continued to feel that way to me for a long time.

French citizens hold candles Friday on the esplanade in Nantes, western France, to pay tribute to the victims of the attacks of Nov. 13.

How Did France Become A Leading Target For Extremists?

Many Americans have seen France as a country that wasn't supportive, bordering on antagonistic, as the U.S. waged wars against radical Islamists on several fronts following the 9/11 attacks.

Fair or not a decade ago, that image is outdated. Today, France is fully engaged in a battle against extremists. It's suffered two major attacks and several near misses this year and now appears more vulnerable to Muslim radicals than any other Western country.

Nordic items clockwise from top left: sugared cloudberries; Norwegian thick salt-pork pancakes, waffles; thick oven-baked pancake; blood pancakes; pancake torte.

In 'The Nordic Cookbook,' An In-Depth Take On Region's Diverse Cuisine

When the idea to write a Nordic cookbook landed on Magnus Nilsson's desk, he was against it. He says it was offensive that someone would think all of Nordic cuisine could fit, let alone belong, in one book.

"The Nordic is a geographical region, not really a cultural region," says the author, who's also head chef at the Michelin-starred Faviken restaurant, 400 miles north of Stockholm. "It's too big, and too varied." (It includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden and several groups of autonomous islands.)

He eventually came around.

This 11-year-old boy lives with his family in a Roma settlement in Belgrade. "He and his brothers and sisters are without documents, but he had this amazing confidence," Constantine says.

Eye On The Invisible: A Photographer's Quest To Spotlight The Stateless

Where do you call home?

It seems like a simple question. But for ten million people around the world, there is no easy answer: They are stateless. They lack basic documents like a passport or a national ID card. And so they may not be able to go to school, hold a job, own land, get health care.

Photographer Greg Constantine calls them "Nowhere People" — that's the title of his new book, which documents the daily lives these individuals.

Ford Workers Approve Contract With UAW By Slim Margin

Ford workers narrowly approved a new four-year contract, wrapping up five months of negotiations between the United Auto Workers union and Detroit automakers.

The UAW said late Friday that Ford's contract passed with a 51.4-percent vote. The agreement covers 53,000 U.S. hourly workers at 22 plants.

The giant roundworm, <em>Ascaris lumbricoides</em>, shows its three serrated lips.

Can A Parasitic Worm Make It Easier (Or Harder) For A Woman To Conceive?

The giant roundworm looks a lot like an earthworm. It's pinkish, up to a foot long and can live for two years.

Immigration Activists March To Save Millions From Deportation

As President Obama tries to save his plan to shield some five million people from deportation, immigration activists have been marching and planning more demonstrations to support him.

Protesters rallied Friday in more than 20 cities, including Washington, DC, New York and Chicago. Actions are scheduled in nine other locations over the weekend.

They say they are mobilizing their constituents to fight for relaxed immigration enforcement because two courts have delayed the president's orders.

Doug Hughes speaks to the media after appearing in federal court in May.

Gyrocopter Pilot Who Landed On Capitol Lawn Pleads Guilty

Florida mailman and gyrocopter pilot Doug Hughes has pleaded guilty to one felony for his campaign-finance reform caper last April. He landed his flying machine on the Capitol lawn before authorities apprehended him.

He meant to deliver individual letters to all senators and House members, urging them to clamp down on superPACs, "dark money" groups and millionaire donors. That didn't work out. He was arrested; Capitol police confiscated the letters and prosecutors hit him with six charges.