National News

U.N.'s Truce Plan For Aleppo Draws Skepticism

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
Palestinian men shout slogans next to Israeli police as they await permission to enter what Jews call the Temple Mount and Muslims call the Nobel Sanctuary, on Nov. 5, in Jerusalem, Israel. Fighting has broken out recently at the compound between Palestinians and Israeli security forces.

At A Tense Jerusalem Holy Site, Palestinians Stand Watch

Muslims call it the Noble Sanctuary. Jews call it the Temple Mount. On the contested hilltop that has been the focus of so much of the unrest in Jerusalem, Muslims who see themselves as "defenders" of the sanctuary raise their voices in a call to God whenever Jewish visitors enter.

One of America's favorite bites: the hotdog. Here, a man and women enjoy the dogs at a California fair in 1905.

A Journey Through The History Of American Food In 100 Bites

Apple pie isn't American in the way people often mean. Every ingredient, from apples to butter to nutmeg and cinnamon, came from somewhere else.

But then, so do most Americans.

A new book traces the roots of American tastes from pemmican to Coca-Cola to what are now called "molecularly modified" foods. Libby O'Connell, the chief historian and a senior vice president for the History Channel and A&E networks, wrote The American Plate: A Culinary History in 100 Bites.

Sal Morales found an Obamacare health plan this year that costs him $145 per month — versus the $560 he'd been paying.

They Paid How Much? How Negotiated Deals Hide Health Care's Cost

As Americans begin shopping again for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act on Saturday, they'll be wrestling with premiums, deductibles, out-of-pocket costs and other vague and confusing insurance-speak.

Believe it or not, that's the easy part compared to figuring out what health care actually costs.

Sal Morales of Miami bought insurance in March during the ACA's first enrollment period on the HealthCare.gov website.

Despite Job Growth, Voters Focus On Stagnant Wages

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Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., chairwoman of the Senate Energy Committee, speaks to reporters Wednesday about the new urgency to get congressional approval for the Canada-to-Texas Keystone XL pipeline at the Capitol in Washington.

Get Ready To Watch This Lame-Duck Congress Sprint

Maybe this duck won't be so lame after all.

Judging by what we've seen so far, the "zombie Congress" that returned to town this week (the reelected and the not-so-lucky) will do more business in the weeks following the election than it did in many months preceding.

Consider these trains — all long-sidetracked, all suddenly leaving the station on Capitol Hill:

Oh, what a tangled web. President Obama weighs in on regulating the Internet.

Tech Week That Was: Obama Rocks The Net Neutrality Debate

Each week, we take a look back at headlines in the technology and society space, but Monday's net neutrality move by President Obama was the biggest headline by a mile. So we've tweaked the typical roundup to focus on net neutrality, with some additional headlines at the end.

One of the most commonly heard Ebola acronyms is PPE, for personal protective equipment. Above, the proper way to don PPE is demonstrated at a CDC presentation. If you're not sure what CDC stands for, see the list of acronyms below.

Doctor, Put On Your PPE And Go Into The ETU, Stat!

As part of UNMEER, WHO — along with GoL, GoSL and NGOS like IMC and MSF — has been fighting the EVD crisis, making sure doctors correctly put on PPEs according to CDC guidelines. Meanwhile WFP is sending in food and DETT from JFC-UA are training health workers who will staff pending ETUs in Liberia.

Did you guess that I was writing about the Ebola outbreak?

These books for daily, independent reading have been sorted by difficulty and labeled with letters. Popular writers, including Dahl and Rowling, get their own bins.

Common Core Reading: Difficult, Dahl, Repeat

The last in our four-part series on reading in the Common Core era.

Jane Byrne savors her victory in the previous night's Democratic primary in 1979, when she defeated incumbent Chicago Mayor Michael Bilandic. She became the city's first female mayor.

No Woman Has Led A Larger U.S. City Than Jane Byrne, Who Died Today

Jane Byrne, who stunned Chicago's powerful political machine in becoming the first and still only woman elected mayor of the nation's third-largest city, died today at the age of 81.

She is being remembered as a trailblazer for women in politics who cracked the glass ceiling in a city whose political oligarchy 'don't want nobody nobody sent.' *

A product of the machine herself and a protege of late mayor Richard J. Daley, Byrne bucked party leaders to topple their annointed candidate, incumbent mayor Michael Bilandic, in the Democratic primary in February of 1979.

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