National News

<em>Star Trek's</em> Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk never even lose pocket change when they use a transporter to get from TV's <em>Starship Enterprise t</em>o distant worlds. What gives?

Beam Me Up? Teleporting Is Real, Even If Trekkie Transport Isn't

"I have a hard time saying this with a straight face, but I will: You can teleport a single atom from one place to another," says Chris Monroe, a biophysicist at the University of Maryland.

His lab's setup in a university basement looks nothing like the slick transporters that rearrange atoms and send them someplace else on Star Trek. Instead, a couple million dollars' worth of lasers, mirrors and lenses lay sprawled across a 20-foot table.

Tribal Chairman Bill Iyall stands on Cowlitz Tribe reservation land with a rendering of the casino the tribe hopes to build on the site near La Center, Washington, just north of Portland, Ore.

'Location Is Everything' In Tribal Casino Dispute

Fewer than 20 miles north of Portland, Ore., off Interstate 5 in southwest Washington state, sits a 150-acre former dairy farm. The Cowlitz Indian Tribe eyed the grassy field as the future home of a casino, and a developer purchased the land for the tribe more than a decade ago.

"It will be a very good attraction for the whole community here, drawing thousands of people daily but also providing thousands of jobs," says Bill Iyall, the Cowlitz tribal chairman.

Actor Jake Gyllenhaal stars in <em>Southpaw</em>, a new film about a junior middleweight boxing champion who faces adversity.

Deford To Hollywood: Ban Boxing Movies

Some people wanna ban boxing. I just wanna ban boxing movies.

You get the feeling sometimes that Hollywood still thinks Joe Louis is heavyweight champion and boxing is still top-tier popular? Yes, there's yet another boxing movie out, this one entitled Southpaw.

Oh, please, please. Making boxing movies when boxing is so passé would be like if Hollywood kept making showbiz movies about vaudeville.

Click the audio above to hear Frank Deford's take on movies about boxing.

Brian Hopson, assistant superintendent at Alameda County Juvenile Hall, stands in one of its many empty units. The 360-bed facility was full when it opened eight years ago, but is now at half capacity.

Meant To Keep Youths Out Of Detention, Probation Often Leads Them There

Juvenile justice reformers have tried for years to figure out what works to help rehabilitate youth in trouble, and a recent shift away from locking kids up has been at the forefront of reform efforts. One of the most common alternatives to incarceration is to order kids directly into probation, instead of juvenile hall.

But the goals of these alternative approaches don't always match the reality — and disproportionately impact youth of color.

<em>The Guardian</em> describes Mexico's fired coach, Miguel Herrera, as "combustible."

Mexico's Soccer Coach Loses Job After Allegedly Punching Reporter

Mexico's soccer coach, Miguel Herrera, has been fired after allegations that he punched a TV reporter.

According to The Guardian, Herrera allegedly punched TV reporter Christian Martinoli while waiting in the TSA line at the Philadelphia airport on Monday.

The altercation came just two days after Mexico's soccer team won the Gold Cup over Jamaica. The paper reports that incoming president Decio de Maria confirmed the coach's termination at a press conference on Tuesday:

Cecil the lion is shown walking in Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park in a YouTube video from July 9, 2015. <em>Credit: Bryan Orford</em><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-baJONYPjQ6olpRwkbxKcQ" data-ytid="UC-baJONYPjQ6olpRwkbxKcQ" data-sessionlink="itct=CCwQ4TkiEwj23PvN8f7GAhVEpqoKHXqABnQo-B0"></a>

Investigation Underway Into Killing Of Cecil, Zimbabwe's Best Known Lion

Conservationists are lamenting the hunting and killing of a well-known lion from western Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park.

The black-maned lion, named Cecil, was 13 years old and had become popular among tourists from around the world.

"He was very, very popular," Johnny Rodrigues, chairman of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force, tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "He's been around for 13 years and a lot of people have seen him."

Carol McMullen-Pettit (right), a Premier Tutor at The Princeton Review, goes over SAT test preparation with 11th-grader Suzane Nazir in Pembroke Pines, Fla.

Is This The Beginning Of The End For The SAT and ACT?

Many high schoolers hoping to attend George Washington University in Washington, D.C., one of the top private universities in the country, breathed a sigh of relief this week.

GWU announced it will no longer require applicants to take the SAT or ACT.

The move comes after the school formed a task force to study the pros and cons of going "test-optional." GWU attracts lots of high-achieving students who do well on both exams, but the task force concluded that the school's reliance on these tests was excluding some high-achieving students who simply don't test well.

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

"Starting a military AI arms race is a bad idea," says a group of researchers and concerned citizens who are urging a ban on offensive military weapons that don't rely on human control. The group signed an open letter that's being delivered at a conference on artificial intelligence this week.

A shortage of lifeguards across U.S. cities could be a fallout of the recovering economy.

During Pool Season, Even Lifeguard Numbers Are Taking A Dive

A teenager locking down a summer job as a lifeguard used to be a big deal.

But this summer, several parks and recreation departments and YMCA's across the country are reporting a shortage of lifeguards. And an improving economy may be playing a big role.

The Ridge Road swimming pool in Raleigh, N.C. is packed. There are easily 200 people here competing in a swim meet, some of them as young as 5 years old.

Dana Bowerman's lifelong best friend Michelle Elliott holds a photograph of the two together. Bowerman is serving a nearly 20-year sentence for federal drug conspiracy charges. She was holding out hope for clemency for nonviolent drug offenders but it is unlikely that she will receive an early release date.

After Hope For Early Release, Prisoners' Applications Stuck In Limbo

It took a while for Dana Bowerman's long prison sentence to sink in.

Bowerman is a onetime honor student and cheerleader whose brassy personality cleared most obstacles from her path. But there was one hurdle her quick mind couldn't leap. In early 2001, Bowerman got sent away for nearly 20 years on federal drug conspiracy charges, her first and only offense. It wasn't until two years in, in her bunk behind a fence in a Texas prison, that her fate seemed real.

"It was a hard swallow," Bowerman said.

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