National News

FIFA President Joseph Blatter (second right) is flanked in Zurich, Switzerland, on Dec. 2, 2010, by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov (right) and Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani after the announcement that Russia will host the soccer World Cup in 2018 and Qatar in 2022.

FIFA Files Criminal Complaint Over 2018, 2022 Soccer World Cup Bidding

Soccer's governing body says it has lodged a criminal complaint against individuals in connection with the awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, days after clearing the winning bids of corruption.

"In particular there seem to be grounds for suspicion that, in isolated cases, international transfers of assets with connections to Switzerland took place, which merit examination by the criminal prosecution authorities," FIFA said in a statement.

GOP Rep. Bill Cassidy and Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu face off in a Dec. 6 Senate runoff. Both are pushing for legislation approving the remaining leg of the Keystone XL pipeline between Alberta, Canada, and Steele City, Neb.

How Many Louisiana Jobs Are Actually At Stake In Keystone Debate?

With the Louisiana Senate runoff driving votes in both chambers of Congress on the Keystone XL pipeline, here's a question: How many of those jobs will actually be in Louisiana?

The answer: zero.

History quiz: Students on campus.

Who Won The Civil War? Tough Question

The old joke used to be: Who is buried in Grant's tomb?

Now it's not so funny anymore.

Recently PoliTech, a group of politically engaged students on the campus of Texas Tech University, posted a video titled "Politically Challenged — Texas Tech Edition" in which they quiz contemporary students about history and politics.

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson arrives at the courthouse for an appearance Tuesday in Conroe, Texas. He pleaded no contest in his child abuse case, avoiding jail time.

NFL Suspends Adrian Peterson For At Least Remainder Of 2014 Season

The National Football League has suspended Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson for the remainder of the 2014 season.

Commissioner Roger Goodell informed Peterson of his suspension in a letter made public on Tuesday.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference Tuesday at his official residence in Tokyo.

With Japan In Recession, Prime Minister Calls For Snap Elections

Just after his country's economy officially fell back into recession, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced he would dissolve parliament and call for elections two years ahead of schedule.

The BBC reports:

"Mr Abe was elected two years ago with an ambitious plan to revive the economy, but has struggled to do so.

"His popularity has fallen but he is expected to win the election, which will take place in mid-December.

"'I will dissolve the lower house on 21 (November) ,' Mr Abe said....

Journalist James Foley in 2011. He was killed by Islamic State militants in Syria in August.

Obama Orders Review Of U.S. Hostage Policy

President Obama has ordered a full review of the process the United States uses to try to recover Americans taken hostage overseas.

In a recent letter to a lawmaker, Christine Wormuth, under secretary of defense for policy, said Obama ordered the review as a "result of the increased frequency of hostage-taking of Americans overseas, and the recognition of the dynamic threat posed by specific terrorist groups."

People react as they stand outside a synagogue on Tuesday in Jerusalem, Israel. Four Israelis were killed and several others wounded in a terrorist attack at the synagogue.

Attack On Jerusalem Synagogue Leaves 4 Dead

(This post was last updated at 11:50 a.m. ET.)

Two assailants, armed with a gun, knives and axes, launched an attack on worshippers at a Jerusalem Synagogue on Tuesday. It left four dead and at least six others wounded.

The U.S. State Department said three of the four killed were dual American and Israeli citizens.

Construction workers in Irbil, in the Kurdish north of Iraq, work on Kurdish business tycoon Shihab Shihab's version of the White House.

Near The Front Lines In Iraq, An Homage To The White House

There are a lot of American knockoffs in the Kurdish parts of northern Iraq: Burger Queen is Burger King's twin, and instead of Papa John's, people get their pizza at PJ's.

The latest knockoff comes courtesy of Kurdish businessman Shihab Shihab after he decided he'd like to live in the White House. So he's building one for himself, his wife and his child — a mere 50 miles or so from a raging war against the Sunni extremist group that calls itself the Islamic State, or ISIS.

Gary Klein is one of the lead attorneys representing homeowners in the case against Ocwen Financial.

Firm Accused Of Illegal Practices That Push Families Into Foreclosure

The fallout from the housing crisis isn't over.

According to Moody's Analytics, there were 700,000 foreclosures last year. And some of those people probably didn't need to lose their homes. Even now, more than six years after the housing crash, lawyers for homeowners say mortgage companies are still making mistakes and foreclosing on homes when they shouldn't be.

Victoria Elizabeth Fischer was presented with a white coat by her grandfather, Dr. Christian Van Den Heuvel, at Georgetown University School of Medicine in August. The ceremony marks the start for each new class of medical students.

Doctor Shortage Looming? Maybe Not

The United States is facing a critical shortage of doctors that could seriously jeopardize the ability of a patient to get medical care in the coming years.

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