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Ibrahim al-Rubaish, the top cleric of Yemen's al-Qaida branch, was killed in a drone strike on Sunday, according to a statement by al-Qaida. This poster is from U.S. State Department Rewards For Justice.

Drone Strike Reportedly Kills Al-Qaida Leader In Yemen

A former Guantanamo Bay prisoner, who had joined al-Qaida after his release, was killed by a U.S. drone strike in Yemen, the group said in a statement Tuesday.

Ibrahim al-Rubaish had fought in Afghanistan before being arrested and held in Guantanamo. He would go on to be one of the top leaders in al-Qaida in Yemen.

The drone attack is a sign that the United States has not abandoned its military campaign against al-Qaida despite the chaos in Yemen. U.S. and Yemeni officials did not immediately comment.

Twenty-four competitors put their brewing techniques to the test last week at the World AeroPress Competition in Seattle.

How AeroPress Fans Are Hacking Their Way To A Better Cup Of Coffee

Perhaps it takes a hacker to lure a hacker.

And Alan Adler, 76, is the ultimate hacker. A serial inventor based in Silicon Valley, Adler has 40 patents to his name. But among coffee aficionados, it's an incredibly simple device that's earned him accolades: the AeroPress.

Earlier this year, the European Central Bank, headed by Mario Draghi, launched a bond-buying program to drive down interest rates and boost borrowing.

When Rates Turn Negative, Banks Pay Customers To Borrow

So what if the bank paid you to take out a loan? That's what's happening in some European countries, where interest rates have gone negative amid efforts by central bankers to boost economic activity.

NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with NPR's John Ydstie about this unusual turn of financial events.

Audie Cornish: What's going on?

A year ago, Lina says her parents took her to Yemen because her grandmother was gravely ill. But when the family arrived, Lina's father announced that she would be getting married to a local man.

Thousands Of Young Women In U.S. Forced Into Marriage

Lina describes herself as strong and independent. Born in Yemen and brought to the U.S. as a toddler, the 22-year-old now works retail at a mall to pay her way through college.

"I was raised very, very Americanized. I did sports, I did community service, I worked," Lina says. (NPR is not using her full name because she fears retribution from her family.)

When people hear her story, she says they tell her, "I never thought that this would ever happen to you."

Most employees at Production Unlimited say they're happy at this sheltered workshop in Watertown, N.Y. But disability advocates say they'd get paid minimum wage, enjoy socializing with nondisabled people and no longer be segregated if they get jobs in community settings.

Advocates Fight To Keep Sheltered Workshops For Workers With Disabilities

It's a hectic day at Production Unlimited in Watertown, N.Y. Everyone has to drop his regular work — making plastic binders, safety equipment, office supplies — for a huge order.

Beth Carpenter punches hole after hole into colored plastic tags. She and her co-workers are paid based on how fast they work, usually well below minimum wage. Carpenter has done all different kinds of tasks here for more than 15 years.

"And I like working here every day," she says. "I work here five days a week. That's why I'd like to make sure we fight to keep this place open."

No Rest For Your Sleeping Brain

There's new evidence that the brain's activity during sleep isn't random. And the findings could help explain why the brain consumes so much energy even when it appears to be resting.

"There is something that's going on in a very structured manner during rest and during sleep," says Stanford neurologist Dr. Josef Parvizi, "and that will, of course, require energy consumption."

President Obama with Cuban President Raul Castro during their historic meeting at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City. The Obama administration announced Tuesday it will remove Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism.

White House Says It Will Remove Cuba From List Of State Sponsors Of Terrorism

The Obama administration announced Tuesday it will remove Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism, a major step in normalizing relations between the two countries. The announcement comes just days after a meeting between President Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro at a summit in Panama.

Food is displayed on shelves at a grocery store in 2014 in Miami, Fla. Advocacy groups say they're concerned that Americans are consuming foods with added flavors, preservatives and other ingredients that have never been reviewed by regulators for immediate dangers or long-term health effects.

Why The FDA Has Never Looked At Some Of The Additives In Our Food

This piece comes from the Center for Public Integrity, a nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organization.

Companies have added thousands of ingredients to foods with little to no government oversight. That's thanks to a loophole in a decades-old law that allows them to deem an additive to be "generally recognized as safe" — or GRAS — without the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's blessing, or even its knowledge.

Tea Tuesdays: The Evolution Of Tea Sets From Ancient Legend To Modern Biometrics

People have been drinking tea for so long that its origin story is rooted in mythology: More than 4,700 years ago, one popular version of the story goes, a legendary Chinese emperor and cultural hero named Shennong (his name means "divine farmer") discovered how to make a tea infusion when a wind blew leaves from a nearby bush into the water he was boiling.

By the 4th century B.C., as Jamie Shallock writes in his book Tea, the beverage had become part of everyday life in China — though in a very different form than we might recognize today.

Chicago Plans Reparations Fund For Victims Of Police Torture In '70s, '80s

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is supporting a proposed $5.5 million reparations package for victims of police torture in the 1970s and '80s.

NPR's Cheryl Corley tells our Newscast unit that more than 100 people are eligible for reparations, including money and counseling, for their treatment at the hands of former police commander Jon Burge and his officers. Burge was fired by the Chicago Police Department in 1993.

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