National News

Supreme Court Blocks Abortion Rules That Closed Most Texas Clinics

The Supreme Court has placed a hold on a 2013 Texas law that was threatening to close most of the state's clinics that perform abortions.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the law was already responsible for the closing of nearly 40 clinics across Texas. Nina filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Australian author Richard Flanagan, 2014's Man Booker Prize winner, holds his book <em>The Narrow Road to the Deep North</em>, at the Royal Festival Hall in London on Monday.

Australian Novelist Richard Flanagan Awarded Booker Prize

On Tuesday in London, the judging panel for Britain's 2014 Man Booker Prize for literature announced this year's winner: The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Australian Richard Flanagan.

The novel, Flanagan's sixth, tells the story of POWs in World War II who were forced by their captors to work on the Thailand-Burma Railway, also known as the "Death Railway" for the more than 100,000 who died in the process of building it.

Students hold a banner with the faces of the missing that reads in Spanish "Iguala, cradle of murders."

In Mexico, Officials Say They Have Found More Mass Graves

Authorities in Mexico issued some important updates on the the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero. According to the Mexican newspaper El Universal:

-- First, authorities said that the 28 bodies inside mass graves found on Oct. 4, did not belong to the missing students.

-- Authorities also said that they had arrested 14 police officers who allegedly confessed to arresting the students and then turning them over to members of the cartel "Guerreros Unidos."

High Court Places Hold On Texas Law That Would've Closed Most Abortion Providers

The Supreme Court has placed a hold on a 2013 Texas law that was threatening to close most of the state's clinics that perform abortions.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the law was already responsible for the closing of nearly 40 clinics across Texas. Nina filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Pro-democracy protesters shout at police forces outside the central government offices in Hong Kong.

IN PICTURES: A Chaotic, Violent Day In Hong Kong, As Police Clear Streets

Over the past day, police in Hong Kong have been trying to clear the streets blocked by demonstrators engaged in acts civil disobedience.

As NPR's Frank Langfitt described it, police played a game of whack-a-mole with protesters. They cleared streets only to have protesters erect roadblocks elsewhere.

Isabella Beukes, of Santa Rosa, Calif., has been legally blind for more than 40 years. An experimental treatment derived from embryonic stem cells seems to have enabled her now to see not just color but also some shapes.

Embryonic Stem Cells Restore Vision In Preliminary Human Test

Scientists are reporting the first strong evidence that human embryonic stem cells may be helping patients.

The cells appear to have improved the vision in more than half of the 18 patients who had become legally blind because of two progressive, currently incurable eye diseases.

The researchers stress that the findings must be considered preliminary because the number of patients treated was relatively small and they have only been followed for an average of less than two years.

Microsoft says it's patching a Windows security flaw cited in a report on alleged spying by Russian hackers.

Microsoft Windows Flaw Let Russian Hackers Spy On NATO, Report Says

A group of hackers, allegedly from Russia, found a fundamental flaw in Microsoft Windows and exploited it to spy on Western governments, NATO, European energy companies and an academic organization in the United States.

That's according to new research from iSight Partners, a Dallas-based cybersecurity firm.

This undated image obtained from Facebook shows Ahmed Abu Khattala, an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya.

Benghazi Suspect, Ahmed Abu Khattala, Is Indicted On 17 New Charges

Ahmed Abu Khattala, the suspected leader of the 2012 attack against the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, has been indicted on 17 new charges by a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C.

If you remember, Khattala was captured by special forces in Libya back in June. He appeared in court later that month and pleaded not guilty to a single count of conspiring to provide material support and resources to terrorists.

John Yoo, a former lawyer with the U.S. Department of Justice, argues that the NSA's phone records surveillance program is constitutional.

Debate: Does Mass Phone Data Collection Violate The 4th Amendment?

The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees that "the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated."

A licensed clinician is decontaminated before disrobing at the end of a simulated training session by CDC in Anniston, Ala. Training can take a several weeks, making some employers reluctant to encourage their medical workers to volunteer in the Ebola outbreak.

Ebola Volunteers Are Needed — But Signing On Isn't Easy

As soon as the Ebola outbreak started to spiral out of control in West Africa, Kwan Kew Lai felt obligated to help.

She's a physician who specializes in infectious disease. And for the last decade, she's dedicated herself to volunteering for international health emergencies. She works part-time at one of Harvard's teaching hospital just to have that flexibility.

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