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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Hagerstown, Md., on Sunday.

Tuesday Primaries: 4 Things We're Watching In 5 States

Five delegate-rich states on the East Coast will vote Tuesday: Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Call it the "Acela Primary" for the train that runs through those states.

There's a lot at stake. Here are four things we're watching:

Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association, stands in front of a row of abandoned homes in West Baltimore. He would like to see them torn down and replaced by a food market, a senior center and a health clinic — all of which the neighborhood currently lacks.

In Baltimore, Hopes Of Turning Abandoned Properties Into Affordable Homes

Baltimore's poorest neighborhoods have long struggled with a lack of decent housing and thousands of abandoned homes.

Things recently took a turn for the worse: Five vacant houses in the city collapsed in high winds several weeks ago, in one case killing a 69-year-old man who was sitting in his car.

The city needs to do more about decaying properties if it wants to revitalize neighborhoods like those where Freddie Gray grew up, says Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association in West Baltimore.

Karen English has taught in the Revere, Mass., schools for 36 years.

How Massachusetts Became The Best State In Education

It was 1993 when Massachusetts Gov. William Weld declared: "A good education in a safe environment is the magic wand that brings opportunity." The Republican was signing into law a landmark overhaul of the state's school funding system. "It's up to us to make sure that wand is waved over every cradle," he added.

With that, Massachusetts poured state money into districts that educated lots of low-income kids, many of which also struggled to raise funds through local property taxes.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks to one of his big campaign rallies, this one in Poughkeepsie, New York.

Campaign Mystery: Why Don't Bernie Sanders' Big Rallies Lead To Big Wins?

If you only considered crowd size at rallies for Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, you might wonder how Clinton has won so many big states. Sanders draws massive, enthusiastic crowds, while Clinton's rallies often seem tiny and subdued by comparison.

Monday night, the eve of five East Coast primaries taking place today, Sanders spoke to an overflow crowd — 3,200 people in total — at Drexel University in Philadelphia. His audience was more than double the crowd that showed up to hear Hillary Clinton speak at Philadelphia's city hall.

Candidate for U.S. Senate Katie McGinty, D-Pa., shakes hands with attendees as she arrives for her roundtable discussion with seniors at the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers in Philadelphia last week.

5 Other Contests To Watch In Tuesday's Primaries

The presidential primaries in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island will get top billing on Tuesday night, but there are several other down-ballot contests to pay attention to as well.

One Senate primary in Pennsylvania will impact how competitive the race there might be in November, while in Maryland a bitter Democratic contest that's turned on race and gender will likely decide the state's next senator.

One Silicon Valley startup that encouraged its employees to think about work 24/7 found they missed market signals, tanked deals and became too irritable to build crucial working relationships.

Many Grouchy, Error-Prone Workers Just Need More Sleep

Hey! Wake up! Need another cup of coffee?

Join the club. Apparently about a third of Americans are sleep-deprived. And their employers are probably paying for it, in the form of mistakes, productivity loss, accidents and increased health insurance costs.

Young people display their Bernie Sanders support as they gather before Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a campaign rally, earlier this month in New York.

Harvard Poll: Millennials Yearn For Bernie, But Prefer Clinton To Trump

Republicans are losing ground when it comes to attracting young voters while, Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders is the only one of the five major presidential hopefuls remaining who has a net positive favorability rating from young Americans.

Those are just two of the findings in a new survey of American adults under 30 years old by Harvard's Institute of Politics.

Federal Judge Upholds North Carolina's Sweeping Voter ID Law

A federal judge upheld a sweeping North Carolina law that required voters to show a photo identification before casting a ballot.

In a 485-page opinion, Thomas D. Schroeder of the Federal District Court in Winston-Salem wrote that the law served a "legitimate state interest" in its effort to "detect and deter fraud."

Former Republican Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert leaves the courthouse following his arraignment on June 9 in Chicago. In a related case, a man who says he was abused by Hastert as a teen is suing over hush money.

Ahead Of Sentencing, Ex-Speaker Dennis Hastert Is Sued Over Hush Money

This post was updated at 8:30 p.m. ET.

A man who says he was sexually abused by former House Speaker Dennis Hastert has sued the Illinois Republican. The alleged victim says he received only $1.7 million of $3.5 million Hastert promised him to keep quiet, NPR's David Schaper reports.

Hastert is scheduled to be sentenced on Wednesday for crimes related to the hush money. He pleaded guilty to structuring cash withdrawals to get around requirements that the bank report big transactions to the federal government.

A woman holds her child to receive rabies vaccines at Hangzhou Hospital for the Prevention and Treatment of Occupational Disease as the child got scratched by a cat on March 22, 2016 in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province of China. A case of illegal vaccines that involved in over 500 million has been broken in Jinan City of east China\'s Shandong Province recent days.

A Criminal Ring In China Sold Expired Vaccines

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