National News

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman — seen here in a photo taken during his recapture on Jan. 8, 2016, could be in the custody of U.S. officials by early 2017.

El Chapo Is A Step Closer To U.S. Extradition, After Judge Denies Appeal

Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman could be brought to face trial in the U.S. by early next year, after a federal judge in Mexico City refused to stop his extradition process. El Chapo is now down to his last appeals.

The case file against Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir is seen at the North Gauteng High court in Pretoria, South Africa, in June 2015 as a judge criticized the government for allowing Bashir, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court, to leave the country. Now South Africa has announced it is leaving the ICC.

South Africa Announces Withdrawal From International Criminal Court

South Africa has decided to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, after previously ignoring an ICC arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir.

Reuters and The Associated Press both say they have seen a document, signed by South Africa's foreign minister, declaring the country's intent to withdraw. The AP reports that legislation to finalize the move has to pass South Africa's parliament, but notes that passage of such a bill is likely.

New York Giants' Josh Brown speaks with reporters at NFL football training camp in East Rutherford, N.J., last August.

NFL's Conduct Policy In Spotlight Again Over Kicker's Admitted Spousal Abuse

The NFL's New York Giants are heading to London for a game against the Los Angeles Rams this Sunday, without their All-Pro kicker Josh Brown.

The decision to leave Brown behind comes after new information emerged in a year-and-a-half-old domestic violence case. And suddenly, there are new questions about whether the league adheres to its supposedly tougher policy against domestic violence.

In May 2015, Brown was arrested for assaulting his then-wife Molly at their home in Washington state. Brown wasn't charged.

A man flips a crepe at the Nutella Shop off of Rukab Street in Ramallah, in the West Bank.

In Jerusalem And West Bank, Nutella Cafes Offer A Sweet Refuge

A group of teenage girls in school uniforms giggle as they share crepes topped with candy and chocolate sauce and oozing hazelnut Nutella. It's a Saturday afternoon and the girls are at the new Nutella shop in Jerusalem's Shuafat Palestinian refugee camp.

The scene is rare in this densely populated and impoverished urban camp. The potholed street outside the café is tense and crowded, as a group of little Palestinian schoolboys fight alongside zigzagging traffic.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg attends the 2015 Kennedy Center Honors in Washington on Dec. 6, 2015.

Justice Ginsburg Will Make Her Operatic Debut — Sort Of

While political Washington is in a tizzy about the election and what it portends for the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is prepping for her operatic debut in Italian composer Gaetano Donizetti's "The Daughter of the Regiment."

For one night in November, the diminutive legal diva will play the nonsinging role of the Duchess of Krakenthorp, a character akin to the dowagers in Marx Brothers movies.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, Cardinal Timothy Dolan and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump laugh during Thursday's Al Smith Dinner at the Waldorf Astoria New York hotel.

At Al Smith Dinner, Donald Trump Turns Friendly Roast Into 3-Alarm Fire

It was tense even before they started. Reporters tweeted that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump entered the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner from separate sides of the room, and didn't even shake hands (which at this point really isn't a surprise).

But there was hope that Thursday night's event could serve as a comedic salve for the nation following three decidedly nasty presidential debates. The fundraising event for Catholic charities — now in its 71st year — traditionally is a time for the candidates to offer jokes about themselves and their opponent.

Texas May Be Denying Tens Of Thousands Of Children Special Education

When Rosley Espinoza's daughter was very young, in preschool, she started acting differently. She seemed distracted and would get in trouble at school.

"Lack of interest, teachers' notes coming home with behavior notes," Espinoza says, speaking in Spanish.

She says she asked school officials to evaluate her daughter, Citlali, for special education, but they didn't.

A protester holds up a street sign with President Robert Mugabe name on it as Zimbabwe opposition supporters clash with police during a protest march for electoral reforms on August 26, 2016 in Harare. Riots erupted in Zimbabwe's capital Harare after police fired tear gas and beat protesters who responded by throwing stones in the latest of a string of tense demonstrations.

Can Hashtags And Pop-Up Protests Topple A Leader?

It's the land of pop-up protests.

Using hashtags and spur-of-the-moment public demonstrations, Zimbabweans are demanding reforms — and the departure of 92-year-old president Robert Mugabe, who has led the country since its independence from Britain in 1980.

Police Gen. Abdulkareem al-Jubouri (center) meets with other police officers outside of Mosul. The police are eager to reclaim their home city from the Islamic State, but some policemen speak openly of seeking revenge.

When Mosul's Cops Return, Will They Seek Reconciliation Or Revenge?

To find Mosul's cops, you drive to a gray dot of a village in an endless desert. The village, Mahana, was retaken from the Islamic State a few months ago and for now it's the police base for cops who left Mosul when ISIS took over more than two years ago.

Iraq's army and its allies are now battling their way through rural areas toward the larger prize of retaking Mosul. Helicopters buzz back and forth from the frontlines. Every breath is bitter with smoke from oil wells set alight by ISIS.

Gloria Steinem speaks at an awards gala in April.

Steinem: For Feminism, A Clinton Win Would Be Helpful But 'Only One Step'

Make no mistake. Gloria Steinem, noted feminist and author, does not see that a woman elected to the White House automatically means a win for feminists or women.

"This is not all about biology, and I think we have to be careful to always say that, because if Sarah Palin were the president it wouldn't signify change," she tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "If President Obama did not represent the majority views of Americans and of African-Americans, he would not represent change as he does. So it isn't about simple biology. It's about what we represent."