National News

The entrance to the emergency room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where Thomas Eric Duncan was treated before he died from Ebola a week ago. Two health care workers who treated Duncan have tested positive for the disease.

Second Health Worker Tests Positive For Ebola At Dallas Hospital

Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET

Officials in Texas say a second health care worker who treated Liberian Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas has preliminarily tested positive for the deadly virus.

The Texas Department of State Health Services says the health care worker, who was among those who cared for Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas after his Ebola diagnosis, "reported a fever Tuesday and was immediately isolated at the hospital."

Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast.

Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?

Jack Scoville was buying himself a chocolate bar a few weeks ago — Hershey's, milk — at a corner store in Chicago. And he noticed the price was just a bit higher than he's used to paying: 5 or 10 cents more. His first thought was not to blame a greedy store owner or the executives in Hershey, Pa.

He blamed Ebola.

An inmate at Rikers Island juvenile detention facility carries a plastic fork behind his back as he walks with other inmates. A recent report found that juvenile detainees are subjected to routine violence, both by other inmates and by correction officers.

'Culture Of Violence' Pervades Rikers' Juvenile Facilities

For most of New York, Rikers Island is out of sight and out of mind. It's in the middle of the East River between Queens and the Bronx. There's only one unmarked bridge that leads on and off. But a recent report on violence by correction officers, or COs, was no surprise to those who've spent time there.

Super Bowl volunteer Ben Schreiber distributes fan guides for Super Bowl XLVI festivities in 2012.

Nonprofit NFL Seeks Super Bowl Volunteers, Again

That familiar old preface we so often hear — usually from long-winded people — is: "To make a long story short." I've noticed lately that that expression has become more common, but, to make a long story short, it's been shortened to just "long story short." I'll even bet it's gotten initialed in the text universe to LSS.

Supreme Court Blocks Abortion Rules That Closed Most Texas Clinics

The Supreme Court has placed a hold on a 2013 Texas law that was threatening to close most of the state's clinics that perform abortions.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the law was already responsible for the closing of nearly 40 clinics across Texas. Nina filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Australian author Richard Flanagan, 2014's Man Booker Prize winner, holds his book <em>The Narrow Road to the Deep North</em>, at the Royal Festival Hall in London on Monday.

Australian Novelist Richard Flanagan Awarded Booker Prize

On Tuesday in London, the judging panel for Britain's 2014 Man Booker Prize for literature announced this year's winner: The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Australian Richard Flanagan.

The novel, Flanagan's sixth, tells the story of POWs in World War II who were forced by their captors to work on the Thailand-Burma Railway, also known as the "Death Railway" for the more than 100,000 who died in the process of building it.

Students hold a banner with the faces of the missing that reads in Spanish "Iguala, cradle of murders."

In Mexico, Officials Say They Have Found More Mass Graves

Authorities in Mexico issued some important updates on the the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero. According to the Mexican newspaper El Universal:

-- First, authorities said that the 28 bodies inside mass graves found on Oct. 4, did not belong to the missing students.

-- Authorities also said that they had arrested 14 police officers who allegedly confessed to arresting the students and then turning them over to members of the cartel "Guerreros Unidos."

High Court Places Hold On Texas Law That Would've Closed Most Abortion Providers

The Supreme Court has placed a hold on a 2013 Texas law that was threatening to close most of the state's clinics that perform abortions.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the law was already responsible for the closing of nearly 40 clinics across Texas. Nina filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Pro-democracy protesters shout at police forces outside the central government offices in Hong Kong.

IN PICTURES: A Chaotic, Violent Day In Hong Kong, As Police Clear Streets

Over the past day, police in Hong Kong have been trying to clear the streets blocked by demonstrators engaged in acts civil disobedience.

As NPR's Frank Langfitt described it, police played a game of whack-a-mole with protesters. They cleared streets only to have protesters erect roadblocks elsewhere.

Isabella Beukes, of Santa Rosa, Calif., has been legally blind for more than 40 years. An experimental treatment derived from embryonic stem cells seems to have enabled her now to see not just color but also some shapes.

Embryonic Stem Cells Restore Vision In Preliminary Human Test

Scientists are reporting the first strong evidence that human embryonic stem cells may be helping patients.

The cells appear to have improved the vision in more than half of the 18 patients who had become legally blind because of two progressive, currently incurable eye diseases.

The researchers stress that the findings must be considered preliminary because the number of patients treated was relatively small and they have only been followed for an average of less than two years.

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