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A typical meal in the Democratic Republic of Congo consists of greens, <em>fufu</em> - a starchy ball made from cassava flour - and meat, such as freshwater fish.

Poverty Plus A Poisonous Plant Blamed For Paralysis In Rural Africa

For nearly a century, people have reported mysterious epidemics of permanent paralysis in rural regions of Africa. In 1990, Hans Rosling a Swedish epidemiologist and pop-star statistician, who died of pancreatic cancer earlier this month, linked the malady to cyanide in the staple crop, cassava.

Kate Noble speaks to voters at a listening session at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe, N.M. She ran for a seat on the Santa Fe Public Schools Board.

Trump's Election Drives More Women To Consider Running For Office

Will the election of Donald Trump, who once boasted of grabbing women by the genitalia and has a history of sexist remarks, create a wave of female candidates at all levels of government in the coming years?

Early signs from the groups that work with women considering a bid for office suggest a level of intense interest not seen in at least a quarter century.

Kate Noble had never considered getting involved in politics until she woke up the day after Trump's surprise victory over Hillary Clinton.

A U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agent passes along a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas.

Trump's Plan To Hire 15,000 Border Patrol And ICE Agents Won't Be Easy

President Trump wants to hire 5,000 more Border Patrol agents and 10,000 more Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers to enforce his executive orders on immigration.

It wont be easy.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly was blunt when asked by a member of Congress about it. He said he will add to the ranks "as fast as we can."

But he quickly added, "we will not lower standards and we will not lower training." Kelly then said he didn't believe "we're going to get 10,000 and 5,000 on board within the next couple of years."

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks during the Munich Security Conference last week. McCain's office has confirmed that while he was overseas, he met with U.S. forces in Syria about defeating ISIS.

Sen. McCain Makes Unannounced Trip To Syria To Meet With U.S. Forces

Sen. John McCain made an unannounced trip to northern Syria last week to meet with U.S. forces stationed there, his office announced on Wednesday.

McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, went to discuss the campaign for defeating militants from the Islamic State.

"Sen. McCain's visit was a valuable opportunity to assess dynamic conditions on the ground in Syria and Iraq," according to a statement from spokeswoman Julie Tarallo.

Keitra Bates stands in front of the building she plans to turn into Marddy's shared kitchen and marketplace.

Preserving The Flavor Of An Atlanta Neighborhood

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election.

Keitra Bates is standing in front of an empty storefront on the west side of Atlanta, Ga. The walls are yellow-painted stucco over cinderblocks, with iron bars on the windows and doors, and a small side yard littered with abandoned tires. A corner store, the Fair Street Superette, is next door.

Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December.

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

Scientists around the United States are getting ready to do an unprecedented experiment: They plan to march en masse in Washington, D.C., and other cities on April 22, to take a stand for the importance of public policies based on science.

Some researchers predict that this March for Science will release much needed energy and enthusiasm at a time when science is under threat; others worry it will damage science's reputation as an unbiased seeker of truth.

The one thing that's certain is that there will be changes in the Affordable Care Act.

What's Next For The Affordable Care Act? Your Questions Answered

No matter where you stand on the political spectrum, health care under the Affordable Care Act is going to change in the next few years. The Republican-led Congress has vowed to "repeal and replace" the health law known as Obamacare.

That has left many people anxious and confused about what will happen and when. So NPR's Morning Edition asked listeners to post questions on Twitter and Facebook, and we will be answering some of them here and on the radio in the weeks ahead.

Cressida Dick, who worked for Scotland Yard for 31 years before leaving to work for Britain's Foreign Office, has been named the new commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police Service, the first woman to lead Scotland Yard in its 188-year history.

Cressida Dick Named Scotland Yard's First Female Top Cop

London's Metropolitan Police Service, better known as Scotland Yard, is Britain's oldest and biggest police force. More than 43,000 officers and staff work for the organization.

On Wednesday, Cressida Dick, 56, was named as the first female police commissioner in the organization's 188-year history.

In a statement, the former beat cop from London's West End, said she was "thrilled and humbled" by the appointment.

Lawsuit Accuses Milwaukee Police Of Abusive Stop And Frisk Practices

Stopping and questioning citizens is a routine police activity but it's also controversial, especially in communities of color where frisking can quickly follow the questions, and the relationship between police and residents can be tense.

The Trump administration has reversed federal guidance that directed public schools to allow students to use the restrooms and locker rooms that corresponded to their gender identities.

Trump Administration Rescinds Obama Rule On Transgender Students' Bathroom Use

The Trump administration is rescinding guidance issued by its predecessor on the rights of transgender students to use bathrooms based on the gender with which they identify.

The move reverses guidance the Obama administration publicized in May 2016, which said a federal law known as Title IX protects that right.

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