National News

Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

Over the years, scientists have mostly interpreted the world through what they can see. But in the last few decades, a culture of listening has blossomed, especially among biologists who seek to understand how animals communicate. This week Morning Edition embarks on a weekly summer series called Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound. We begin with an innovation that transformed medicine by searching sounds for clues to illness and health.

A young man peers out a window in a holding cell after arriving at the intake unit at Alameda County Juvenile Hall.

At One Juvenile Hall, Too Few Staff Has A Big Impact

Across the country, there are efforts to close outdated and dangerous juvenile detention centers. But even in places with so-called model juvenile halls, counties often struggle to meet the minimum standards.

A juvenile hall in San Leandro, Calif., is one such detention center that's generally well regarded but faces some major challenges. Built in 2007, it's part of a $176 million juvenile justice complex with a detention facility, courtrooms and law offices.

President Obama is the first sitting president to visit a federal prison.

Pell Grants For Prisoners: An Old Argument Revisited

It's an old and controversial question: Should federal Pell grants be used to help prisoners pay for college?

Tomorrow, at a prison in Jessup, Md., Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch are expected to unveil a program to do just that. The new plan would create a limited pilot program allowing some students in prison to use Pell grants to pay for college classes.

The key word there is "limited" — because there's only so much the administration can do. To understand why, we have to go back to November 1993.

The Crime Bill

A Google Street View car equipped with Aclima mobile sensors that can track air pollution in real time.

Some Google Street View Cars Now Track Pollution Levels

For years, Google has had eyes in neighborhoods across the world: Google Street View cars armed with cameras, lasers, and GPS devices to filter "360-degree panoramic views" and "locations on all seven continents" to Google Maps.

A piece of a wing, apparently from a Boeing 777, has been found on Reunion, an island the Indian Ocean. It's not clear yet whether the debris from the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared from radar during a flight last year.

Debris In The Indian Ocean May Have Come From Vanished Airliner

Authorities on the French island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean have found debris that may be from a missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

A source familiar with the investigation tells NPR's Geoff Brumfiel that the debris appears to have come from a large passenger aircraft, but it remains unclear whether it's from Malaysia Airlines flight 370, which vanished from radar on March 8, 2014.

Michel Platini of Fance announced his campaign for FIFA president and is considered a strong candidate.

Michel Platini Is Running For President Of Scandal-Plagued FIFA

A new candidate has tossed his name in the hat for FIFA President.

France's Michel Platini is currently the president of the European soccer's governing body, UEFA, and a FIFA vice president. He wrote that he wanted "to give FIFA back the dignity and the position it deserves," in a UEFA press release.

A photo released by Virgin Galactic shows a badly injured SpaceShipTwo pilot Peter Siebold drifting under his parachute after last October's accident that destroyed the spacecraft during a test flight.

SpaceShipTwo 'Pilot Was Thrown From The Vehicle' High In Atmosphere

The dramatic failure of a test flight by Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo rocket last October cost the co-pilot his life and left the pilot severely injured. New data from investigators suggest that the pilot survived in part because the craft essentially came apart around him.

Pilot Peter Siebold told the National Transportation Safety Board that when the flight went wrong, he heard a loud bang, and then what sounded like "paper fluttering in the wind" — believed to be the sound of the spaceship's cabin disintegrating.

Lake herring roe at the Dockside Fish Market in Grand Marais, Minn. Some workers at the market call it "Lake Superior Gold."

Europe's Taste For Caviar Is Putting Pressure On A Great Lakes Fish

Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world, by surface area, and it has something the other Great Lakes do not: stable populations of mostly native fish species.

But scientists say a key fish in Superior's food web is now in trouble because of mild winters and an appetite for caviar in Europe.

There wasn't much demand for lake herring 10 years ago. It used to be fed to mink and used as fertilizer, according to Craig Hoopman, a commercial fisherman in Wisconsin who fishes around Lake Superior's Apostle Islands.

From The Silents To Millennials, Debt Burdens Span The Generations

For most of us, debt is a big part of life. According to a new study by Pew Charitable Trusts, 80 percent of Americans have some form of debt — from student loans to credit card balances.

There are many among the so-called silent generation, those born before World War II, who are still paying off mortgages and credit cards.

Johanna Fernández, co-curator of a new exhibition about the Young Lords, points to pages of the group's newspaper on display at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.

Once Outlaws, Young Lords Find A Museum Home For Radical Roots

They were under watch by the FBI and the New York Police Department. And by the early 1970s, the Young Lords emerged as one of the country's most prominent radical groups led by Latino activists.

Inspired by the Black Panthers, a band of young Puerto Ricans wanted to form a Latino counterpart to the black nationalist group. In fact, one of the founding Young Lords in New York City almost started a group called the "Brown Tigers."

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