National News

A police officer guards the entrance of the judicial police headquarters in Paris. The French prosecutor's office said Salah Abdeslam, the key suspect in the Paris attacks, was transferred from Belgium to France on Wednesday morning.

Key Paris Attacks Suspect Salah Abdeslam Extradited To France

French and Belgian officials say they have extradited Salah Abdeslam to France. Abdeslam, a key suspect in last November's Paris attacks, was captured in March in Brussels after a months-long manhunt.

Abdeslam, 26, arrived in France at 9:05 a.m. local time, according to a statement from the French prosecutor's office. He's expected to appear before a French judge today.

Democrat Geraldine Ferraro waves from the podium after accepting the vice presidential nomination at the the Democratic National Convention in 1984.

Clinton's Road To The Nomination Was Paved By Other Women Who Ran

After big wins in four states Tuesday, Hillary Clinton is on the verge of becoming the Democratic nominee for president. Clinton would become the first woman ever to top a major party's presidential ticket.

That milestone has been somewhat lost in the drama of this campaign, but is still "a really important moment in American society," said political science professor Andra Gillespie of Emory University.

"The impact is just as important for a woman to head the top of a major-party ticket as it was for an African-American to do so eight years ago," she said.

On To Indy: Hoosier State Could Be Stand For Trump Challengers, Sanders

Everyone knew Iowa would matter — and New Hampshire, too. The other February contests got a lot of attention, as did Super Tuesday and the mega-states like New York. And, yes, late in the season, you heard people saying, it might all come down to California.

But when did anyone know to get excited about Indiana?

It comes late in the season, with the great majority of states voting sooner and allocating the great majority of delegates, so no one seemed to give a hoot about the Hoosier State — the one and only primary on May 3.

U.S. college readiness scores are down according to the standardized test known as the Nation's Report Card.

Most High School Seniors Aren't College Or Career Ready, Says 'Nation's Report Card'

The latest results of the test known as the Nation's Report Card are in. They cover high school seniors, who took the test in math and reading last year. The numbers are unlikely to give fodder either to educational cheerleaders or alarmists: The average score in both subjects was just one point lower in 2015 compared with the last time the test was given, in 2013. This tiny downtick was statistically significant in mathematics, but not for the reading test.

But even though the changes are small, chances are you're going to be hearing about them in a lot of places.

In this May 12, 2015, file photo, former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell navigates a group of cameras as he leaves the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.

Supreme Court To Hear Arguments In Bob McDonnell Corruption Case

The U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday in a case that tests the corruption conviction of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell.

At issue is a great deal more than one case.

The federal government contends that if the Supreme Court voids the conviction, it could cripple enforcement of laws against public corruption. The defense counters that if the conviction is upheld, it would turn ordinary political acts into crimes.

A bill in New York would allow police to examine drivers' phones to see if they were using the device at the time of an accident.

New York Wants To Know: Have You Been Texting And Driving?

You probably know it's against the law in most states to text and drive — but studies suggest that many of us still peek at our smartphones when we're behind the wheel.

This habit, however, contributes to distracted driving, which is a factor that researchers at Virginia Tech found to account for almost 70 percent of car accidents.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, 3,179 people were killed in car crashes involving a distracted driver in 2014.

Dick and Dolly Miller play the slots at the Cal-Nev-Ari Casino. They say the thought of Nancy Kidwell stepping down makes folks nervous here.

A Tiny Nevada Town Hits The Market For $8 Million — Casino Included

An hour south from the bright lights of the Las Vegas strip, a tiny town in Nevada is up for sale.

Cal-Nev-Ari, Nev. (pronounced Cal-Nev-Air) is off a lonely stretch of Highway 95, surrounded by distant mountains and endless desert. The town isn't far from the California and Arizona borders, which is how it got its name.

If you can afford the $8 million asking price, you'll get the airstrip, the diner and the town's only casino. That includes a dozen old slot machines and a smokey bar. This place has character.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at her primary election night rally in Philadelphia.

With The Nomination All But Decided, Clinton's And Sanders' Goals Change

Hillary Clinton hasn't won the nomination, yet. And Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders hasn't technically lost. But in a statement released after the results were in, Sanders' rhetoric took a notable turn.

"[W]e are in this race until the last vote is cast," he said, with no mention of winning the nomination.

Instead, "[T]his campaign is going to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia with as many delegates as possible to fight for a progressive party platform."

Ruling May Help Patients Keep More Of The Winnings When They Sue

Accidents happen, and if they are someone else's fault, you can go to court to try to get compensation for your medical expenses, lost wages and pain and suffering. If you win, though, the pot of gold you receive may be considerably smaller than you expect. Your health plan may claim some — or all — of the award as reimbursement for money it spent on your medical care.

Aissatou Sanogo and her late husband, Souleymane Diaby.

She Told Her Husband She Didn't Want Him To Leave For Europe

One evening in November 2014, Aissatou Sanogo's husband came to tell her some startling news.

"Aissatou," he said, "I'm leaving for Europe" — that very night. He earned a modest salary as a bakery delivery man in Senegal but had dreams of making far more in a European country.

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