National News

Hoover Tower is seen through a sculpture by Kenneth Snelson on the campus of Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2009.

Stanford Bans Hard Liquor From On-Campus Parties, Limits Bottle Sizes

As Stanford undergrads get ready for the fall semester, the university's administrators have issued a new mandate: Pack your books and calculators, but leave the fifths and handles at home.

On Monday, just over a month before classes resume, the university announced a set of changes to its alcohol policy.

Hard liquor will now be completely banned from on-campus parties — unless the party is hosted by groups exclusively for graduate students, and in that case, only mixed drinks are allowed. "Straight shots of hard alcohol are never allowed at any party," the school says.

Paleoartist Peter Schouten's reconstruction of <em>Microleo attenboroughi</em> prowling along the branches of rain forest trees in search of prey.

Extinct 'Micro Lion' Is Named For Sir David Attenborough

Paleontologists at the University of New South Wales in Australia say they have identified a tiny new species of marsupial lion that lived around 18 million years ago.

The extinct, squirrel-size animal weighed about 1.3 pounds, very likely lived in trees and had teeth that suggest it was capable of ripping apart other small creatures with its molars.

The researchers named it Microleo attenboroughi in honor of Sir David Attenborough, the famed British naturalist who has hosted numerous documentaries on wildlife.

Hiroyuko Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them.

Japan Offers 'Dementia Awareness' Courses To City Workers

Early mornings are routine for 69-year-old Hiroyuko Yamamoto. He's typically at a busy intersection in the city of Matsudo, near Tokyo, where he volunteers as a school crossing guard. But one rainy morning a little over a year ago, an old woman caught his attention

She was pushing a bicycle. She was kind of disheveled. Despite the rain, she didn't have an umbrella. When Yamamoto spoke to the woman, she said she was trying to get to the city of Kamisuwa. That's about four hours away by train.

Four days after Rory Staunton cut himself in gym class, he died from septic shock.

Health Officials Struggle To Fight Deadly Sepsis Infections

After Rory Staunton fell at the gym and cut his arm in March of 2012, the 12-year-old became feverish. He vomited during the night and complained of a sharp pain in his leg. When his parents called his pediatrician the next day, she said there was a stomach virus going around New York City, and his leg pain was likely due to his fall.

But she did advise his parents, Orlaith and Ciaran Staunton, to take Rory to the emergency department because of possible dehydration. The hospital workers did some blood work, gave him fluids and sent him home.

Afghan police train with their weapons in Lashkar Gah, Afghanistan, in July. Hundreds of U.S. troops are deployed to train and assist security forces in Helmand province, where the Taliban have recently made territorial gains.

U.S. Service Member Killed In Afghanistan's Helmand Province

A U.S. service member was killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan's restive Helmand province Tuesday — the second U.S. combat death in Afghanistan since January.

The service member was conducting "train, advise, assist activities" with Afghan forces when the explosive device went off, according to the U.S. Defense Department. Another American service member and six Afghan soldiers were wounded in the attack near the provincial capital, Lashkar Gah.

The "Green Giant" mechanical tea harvester, one of only a few in the world, does the manual work of 500 people.

Yes, America Has A Working Tea Plantation. We Visited It

Just southwest of bustling Charleston, S.C., lies a lush and rural gem called Wadmalaw Island, one of the Sea Islands that dot the shoreline. This is the home of the Charleston Tea Plantation, the only commercial tea plantation in North America.

President Obama steps off Air Force One as he arrives at Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport in Baton Rouge, La., on Tuesday.

President Obama Tours Flood Destruction In Louisiana

More than a week after record-breaking rain inundated 20 parishes in southeastern Louisiana, President Obama arrived Tuesday to survey the damage.

The president toured a neighborhood in East Baton Rouge Parish ravaged in the widespread flooding that has claimed more than a dozen lives and damaged some 60,000 homes. Afterward, he thanked first responders, the National Guard and "all the good neighbors" who rescued people as the water rose.

Tighter Patent Rules Could Help Lower Drug Prices, Study Shows

The U.S. could rein in rising drug prices by being more selective about giving patents to pharmaceutical companies for marginal developments, a study concludes.

That's because brand-name drugs with patents that grant exclusivity account for about 72 percent of drug spending, even though they are only about 10 percent of all prescriptions dispensed, according to the study, published Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association.

Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Akron, Ohio, Monday.

On Immigration, Trump Appears To Shift Focus To Getting 'Rid Of The Bad Ones'

Would a President Donald Trump attempt to forcefully remove an estimated 11 million people from the United States?

Three days after Trump's campaign first hinted it was reconsidering walking back from a core campaign promise, the answer still isn't clear.

Firas Awad (left) and wife Tamam Aldrawsha, from Syria, spend hours studying German every day. Awad wants to complete the pharmacy studies he abandoned because of the Syrian war, and Aldrawsha wants to become a nurse. "I want to be useful," she says, "useful for my family and useful for this country."

In A Tiny German Town, Residents And Refugees Adapt

Like hundreds of thousands of Syrians fleeing the long war back home, 25-year-old Firas Awad endured a dangerous sea journey and a long trek through much of Europe to reach Germany, where he's staked his future.

He and his 18-year-old wife, Tamam Aldrawsha, who are both from the city of Homs, now live in what used to be a country inn and restaurant, in a tiny, forested village north of Berlin called Klosterheide, population 280.

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