National News

Degan Ali, a Somali-American humanitarian, describes herself on Twitter as a "social justice activist, Muslima."

A Somali Aid Worker Would Rather Give Out Cash Than Free Food

In 2011, drought hit Somalia hard, triggering a famine that ultimately killed some 260,000 people. Now, after a poor rainy season, the Food and Agriculture Organization is warning that the country could be on the brink of another famine.

On Lumley Beach, after day trippers have headed home, prostitutes look for customers along a 100-yard stretch of road near some of the nicer hotels as well as near the bars and restaurants along the beachfront.

Hissing And Sighing: The Lament Of Sex Workers In Sierra Leone

When a man drives by the strip at Lumley Beach in downtown Freetown at night, he'll probably hear a sharp hiss. That's not an unusual sound in Sierra Leone. People hiss instead of whistling — to get your attention, to call for the bill at a restaurant, to buy a bottle of water on the street.

But the hissing along a stretch of beachfront road at Lumley Beach has a different purpose. It's the sound prostitutes make, and they've perfected the hiss. That's why they're called serpents.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Justice Ginsburg Has Heart Procedure, Is Resting Comfortably

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the leader of the Supreme Court's liberal wing, is "resting comfortably" after a heart procedure, the court said in a statement.

Ginsburg, 81, "experienced discomfort during routine exercise" on Tuesday and was taken to a Washington, D.C., hospital. According to the statement, doctors inserted a stent in her right coronary artery to address a blockage.

"She is resting comfortably and is expected to be discharged in the next 48 hours," the statement said.

Update at 10:57 a.m. ET. 'Awake And Demanding Work':

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy testifies at an oversight hearing of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington on July 23.

EPA Proposes New Rules To Curb Ozone Levels

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unveiled new rules today to reduce emission levels for smog-causing ozone, which is linked to asthma and other health problems.

The draft measure calls for lowering the threshold for ozone from 75 parts per billion to between 65 ppb and 70 ppb. The agency said it would take comments on an ozone level as low as 60 ppb.

Patient Safety Journal Finds Violations, Tightens Standards After Scandal

The aftershocks of what some have called the patient safety movement's first scandal continue to reverberate in the medical community, most recently in the current issue of the Journal of Patient Safety.

Ronald And Vivian Joseph perform the "Death Spiral' on Oct. 26, 1963, at the World Championships. The International Olympic Committee announced this week that the Josephs, who originally placed fourth in the 1964 Winter Games in Innsbruck, Austria, were in fact the bronze medalists.

After 50 Years, An Olympic Medal Dispute Is Resolved

American figure skaters Vivian and Ronald Joseph placed fourth in the 1964 Winter Games in Innsbruck, Austria. But a couple years later, the International Olympic Committee determined that the West German silver medalists, Marika Kilius and Hans-Jurgen Baumler, had signed a professional contract before the games and stripped them of their medals [the IOC took such things seriously in those days].

University Of Virginia Apologizes To Student Who Says She Was Gang Raped

The University of Virginia publicly apologized on Tuesday to a student who told Rolling Stone magazine that she was gang raped during a fraternity party in 2012.

As we reported, the magazine's harrowing account led to protests and a university ban on fraternities until January.

Sandy Hausman, of NPR member station WVTF, filed this report for our Newscast Unit:

A photo of officer Darren Wilson released as part of evidence shown before the grand jury.

In Ferguson, A Trove Of Evidence — But No Trial

On Monday night, St. Louis County prosecutor Robert McCulloch delivered the news that police officer Darren Wilson would not be indicted in the shooting death of Michael Brown. And in an unusual move, the announcement was accompanied by the release of an enormous batch of evidence presented to the grand jury — including much-talked about photos of Wilson, taken after he shot and killed Brown.

Travelers make their way through Miami International Airport on Tuesday.

Winter Storm Threatens Thanksgiving Day Travel

A big winter storm spinning its away across the East Coast of the United States is expected to wreak havoc on Thanksgiving Day travel plans.

The National Weather Service says that travelers from the Carolinas all the way up to New England could see significant snow and the entire East Coast will see some kind of precipitation.

Weather.com reports:

Members of the National Guard detain a protester in Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday. More than 2,000 National Guard troops spread out across the St. Louis area to prevent another night of rioting and looting after a grand jury declined to indict officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

A Calmer Night In Ferguson, Mo., Amid Increased National Guard Presence

Updated at 6:22 a.m.

Police in Ferguson, Mo., made 44 arrests after another night of protests — these much calmer than the unrest that erupted after a grand jury declined Monday to indict officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Many of the protesters say they are angry that Wilson, who is white, was not charged in the shooting of Brown, who was black.

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