National News

Problems with hair care products are among the most common in the FDA's database.

More Health Problems Reported With Hair And Skin Care Products

We rub, pour, sprinkle and spray them all over our bodies, so you'd hope cosmetics would undergo serious safety oversight before they get into our hands. But in fact, the cosmetics industry is largely self-regulated, with no requirements for approval before going on the market. And once on the market, there are few systems in place by to monitor the safety of personal care products.

Valerie Castile, mother of Philando Castile, listens during a November 2016 news conference in Minneapolis. On Monday, she reached a near $3 million settlement from the city of St. Anthony, Minn., over the killing of her son by a city police officer.

Philando Castile's Mother Reaches $3 Million Settlement Over Police Shooting

The mother of Philando Castile, a black motorist who was shot to death by a police officer last summer in Minnesota, has reached a settlement deal in the city of St. Anthony worth nearly $3 million.

A man waits to be processed at a Border Patrol detention center in Imperial Beach, Calif.

Supreme Court Will Re-Hear Immigrant Indefinite Detention Case

The U.S. Supreme Court says it will re-hear a case that asks whether immigrants detained by the government have a right to a bond hearing to challenge their indefinite detention.

The case was argued in November 2016, months before Justice Neil Gorsuch filled the vacant seat of late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Cholera bacteria can colonize the outer surfaces of the Chinese soft-shell turtle, a species that's found in parts of Asia.

Cholera Hitches A Ride On The Backs Of Soft-Shell Turtles

You can catch cholera from drinking contaminated water.

You can catch it from raw or undercooked shellfish.

And you can catch it from soft-shell turtles.

That's the finding of a study published earlier this month by scientists at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. And it's a particular concern in China and many other countries in East Asia, where turtle meat is often used in stews and soups.

Maria Guadalupe Guereca, 60, visits the grave of her son Sergio Hernandez Guereca at the Jardines del Recuerdo cemetery in Juarez, Mexico, earlier this year. Her son was shot by a U.S. agent across the border in 2010.

Supreme Court Sends Cross-Border Shooting Case Back To Lower Court

Can the family of a slain Mexican teenager sue the federal agent who shot him across the U.S.-Mexico border for damages? The U.S. Supreme Court did not answer this question on Monday, instead opting to send a case back to a lower court.

The case centers on a larger question: whether the Constitution extends protection to an individual who is killed on foreign soil, even though that person is standing just a few yards outside the United States.

Muslims and supporters gather on the steps of Borough Hall in Brooklyn, N.Y., during a protest against President Trump's temporary travel ban in February.

Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

e Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland, and allowing parts of the ban that's now been on hold since March to take effect.

The justices removed the lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of two injunctions that had put the ban in limbo.

Children play on the playground at the Trinity Lutheran Child Learning Center in Columbia, Mo.

Supreme Court Rules Religious School Can Use Taxpayer Funds For Playground

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that taxpayer-funded grants for playgrounds available to nonprofits under a state program could not be denied to a school run by a church.

"The consequence is, in all likelihood, a few extra scraped knees. But the exclusion of Trinity Lutheran from a public benefit for which it is otherwise qualified, solely because it is a church, is odious to our Constitution all the same, and cannot stand," Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority.

British Prime Minister Theresa May, left, greets Arlene Foster, leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party, outside 10 Downing Street in London on Monday.

Britain's May Forms Minority Government With Backing Of Northern Irish Party

The Democratic Unionist Party has given U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May enough votes to form a government, signing a "confidence and supply" agreement to back May's Conservatives in confidence votes and on key economic issues. The DUP also secured more than $1 billion in economic assistance for Northern Ireland.

"This agreement will operate to deliver a stable government in the United Kingdom's national interest at this vital time," DUP leader Arlene Foster said.

Arpaio confronts protesters during a 2010 rally in Rancho Bernardo, California.

'America's Toughest Sheriff' Joe Arpaio Goes On Trial

For 24 years, Joe Arpaio was a tough talking sheriff in Arizona, famous for cracking down on illegal immigration.

About a decade ago Arpaio, dubbed "America's Toughest Sheriff" in conservative circles, started instructing his deputies to make traffic stops and detain any unauthorized immigrants they encountered. Then they'd turn the immigrants over to federal agents for deportation.

Left to right: mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe; from Amber, India; and from Washington state.

Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know

In many ways, parenting newborns seems instinctual.

We see a little baby, and we want to hold her. Snuggle and kiss her. Even just her smell seems magical.

Many of us think breast-feeding is similar.

"I had that idea before my first child was born," says Brooke Scelza, an evolutionary anthropologist at the University of Los Angeles, California. "I definitely thought, 'Oh, I'm going to figure that out. Like how hard can it be?' "

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